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Monster Black Hole - How the Universe Works (S04E03)

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Monster Black Hole - How the Universe Works (S04E03)

How the Universe Works - Monster Black Hole (Season 4/Episode 3).
Black holes are the least understood places in the universe, where the rules of physics collapse. We go inside the super-massive black hole in the center of the Milky Way.

Archived for educational purposes only. No copyright infringement intended. All rights belong to Discovery.

#HowTheUniverseWorks #MonsterBlackHole #Documentary #Discovery #BlackHole #Universe

How the Universe Works Season 7 Episode 4 How Black Holes Made Us

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Monster Black Holes - Space Documentary HD

A black hole is a mathematically defined region of spacetime exhibiting such a strong gravitational pull that no particle or electromagnetic radiation can escape from it. The theory of
general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass can deform spacetime to form a black hole.[2][3] The boundary of the region from which no escape is possible is called the event
horizon. Although crossing the event horizon has enormous effect on the fate of the object crossing it, it appears to have no locally detectable features. In many ways a black hole acts like
an ideal black body, as it reflects no light. Moreover, quantum field theory in curved spacetime predicts that event horizons emit Hawking radiation, with the same spectrum as a black
body of a temperature inversely proportional to its mass. This temperature is on the order of billionths of a kelvin for black holes of stellar mass, making it essentially impossible to observe.

Objects whose gravitational fields are too strong for light to escape were first considered in the 18th century by John Michell and Pierre-Simon Laplace. The first modern solution of general
relativity that would characterize a black hole was found by Karl Schwarzschild in 1916, although its interpretation as a region of space from which nothing can escape was first published by
David Finkelstein in 1958. Long considered a mathematical curiosity, it was during the 1960s that theoretical work showed black holes were a generic prediction of general relativity. The discovery
of neutron stars sparked interest in gravitationally collapsed compact objects as a possible astrophysical reality.Thanks for watching Please Like, Share, Comment and Subscribe.

Super Massive Black Holes | How The Universe Works

How do super massive black holes form?
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2of4 -How The Universe Works - Black Holes

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Playlist Episode two of How the Universe Works is all about Black Holes. Delve into the .

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Black Holes,the most powerful destroyers in the Universe, the most mysterious phenomena in the heavens. For years they were only speculation, now modern .

How the Universe Works - Black holes - Space Discovery Documentary

The idea of an object in space so massive and dense that light could not escape it has been around for centuries. Most famously, black holes were predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity, which showed that when a massive star dies, it leaves behind a small, dense remnant core. If the core's mass is more than about three times the mass of the Sun, the equations showed, the force of gravity overwhelms all other forces and produces a black hole.

Scientists can't directly observe black holes with telescopes that detect x-rays, light, or other forms of electromagnetic radiation. We can, however, infer the presence of black holes and study them by detecting their effect on other matter nearby. If a black hole passes through a cloud of interstellar matter, for example, it will draw matter inward in a process known as accretion. A similar process can occur if a normal star passes close to a black hole. In this case, the black hole can tear the star apart as it pulls it toward itself. As the attracted matter accelerates and heats up, it emits x-rays that radiate into space. Recent discoveries offer some tantalizing evidence that black holes have a dramatic influence on the neighborhoods around them - emitting powerful gamma ray bursts, devouring nearby stars, and spurring the growth of new stars in some areas while stalling it in others.
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How The Universe Works | Black Holes The Secret Origin | Episode 3 Season 5 हिंदी اردو Hindi Urdu ᴴᴰ

A black hole is a region of spacetime exhibiting such strong gravitational effects that nothing—not even particles and electromagnetic radiation such as light—can escape from inside it. The theory of general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass can deform spacetime to form a black hole. The boundary of the region from which no escape is possible is called the event horizon. Although the event horizon has an enormous effect on the fate and circumstances of an object crossing it, no locally detectable features appear to be observed. In many ways a black hole acts like an ideal black body, as it reflects no light. Moreover, quantum field theory in curved spacetime predicts that event horizons emit Hawking radiation, with the same spectrum as a black body of a temperature inversely proportional to its mass. This temperature is on the order of billionths of a kelvin for black holes of stellar mass, making it essentially impossible to observe.

Objects whose gravitational fields are too strong for light to escape were first considered in the 18th century by John Michell and Pierre-Simon Laplace. The first modern solution of general relativity that would characterize a black hole was found by Karl Schwarzschild in 1916, although its interpretation as a region of space from which nothing can escape was first published by David Finkelstein in 1958. Black holes were long considered a mathematical curiosity; it was during the 1960s that theoretical work showed they were a generic prediction of general relativity. The discovery of neutron stars in the late 1960s sparked interest in gravitationally collapsed compact objects as a possible astrophysical reality.

Black holes of stellar mass are expected to form when very massive stars collapse at the end of their life cycle. After a black hole has formed, it can continue to grow by absorbing mass from its surroundings. By absorbing other stars and merging with other black holes, supermassive black holes of millions of solar masses (M☉) may form. There is general consensus that supermassive black holes exist in the centers of most galaxies.

Despite its invisible interior, the presence of a black hole can be inferred through its interaction with other matter and with electromagnetic radiation such as visible light. Matter that falls onto a black hole can form an external accretion disk heated by friction, forming some of the brightest objects in the universe. If there are other stars orbiting a black hole, their orbits can be used to determine the black hole's mass and location. Such observations can be used to exclude possible alternatives such as neutron stars. In this way, astronomers have identified numerous stellar black hole candidates in binary systems, and established that the radio source known as Sagittarius A*, at the core of the Milky Way galaxy, contains a supermassive black hole of about 4.3 million solar masses.

On 11 February 2016, the LIGO collaboration announced the first direct detection of gravitational waves, which also represented the first observation of a black hole merger. As of April 2018, six gravitational wave events have been observed that originated from merging black holes.

The Dark Matter Enigma - How the Universe Works (S05E08)

How the Universe Works - The Dark Matter Enigma (Season 5/Episode 8).
Dark matter is the biggest mystery of the Cosmos. Scientists know that it has been vital to the universe since its birth, new discoveries reveal that it could create black holes, cause mass extinctions, and might even have helped to shape life on the Earth. Might there be a dark matter universe that may account for all the events that aren't really definable? This is all pure speculation and if's.

Archived for educational purposes only. No copyright infringement intended. All rights belong to Discovery.

#HowTheUniverseWorks #TheDarkMatterEnigma #Documentary #Discovery #Universe #DarkMatter

Strange Lives of Dwarf Planets - How the Universe Works (S06E08)

How the Universe Works - Strange Lives of Dwarf Planets (Season 6/Episode 8).
Our solar system is home to hundreds of strange, tiny worlds called dwarf planets, and new discoveries reveal the secrets of these mysterious places.

Archived for educational purposes only. No copyright infringement intended. All rights belong to Discovery.

#HowTheUniverseWorks #StrangeLivesofDwarfPlanets #Documentary #Discovery #Universe #Planets

Black Hole - Dive into the Power Centers of the Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

This groundbreaking new series follows a trail of energy into the power centers of the universe. Each program visualizes these realms based on current scientific data and uses state of the art supercomputer simulations. Dive into the heart of a supermassive black hole, fly down onto the toxic landscapes of alien planets and ride along the roiling surface of a star that's about to explode!
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4 Secret History of Pluto

Deep Space | Inside a Black Hole - Documentary HD 2017

Deep Space | Inside a Black Hole - Documentary HD 2017Black Holes Space Documentary
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How the Universe Works Series 4 4of8 Edge of the Solar System 720p HDTV x264 AAC MVGroup org

Is It a Black Hole? Or a Gravastar?

What if the objects that we identify as black holes are actually far more bizarre and exotic? DCODE the strange theoretical bodies known as Gravastars.

#DCODE #HowTheUniverseWorks #BlackHoles

Black Hole Power - How the Universe Works - ( Subtitled )

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6 The Universe's Deadliest

How the Universe Works - The Search For a Second Earth

The Search For a Second Earth by The Science Channel. Buy How the Universe Works series on Discovery Store:

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⚠ Video information:
Serie: How the Universe Works: Season 3
Episode: 9
Network: Discovery Channel, The Science Channel
Narrator: Mike Rowe
Release date: 2014
Genre: Documentary

⚠ Video settings:
Dimension: 1280x720
Bitrate: 3500
FPS: 30
Audio: 160/48kHz

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This video is meant for entertainment and educational purposes. The Science Channel/Discovery Channel is the developer and publisher of this documentary for the purpose of copyright. All rights reserved.

Black Holes - Hyperspace with Sam Neill (E03)

Hyperspace with Sam Neill - Black Holes (Episode 3).
Episode three looks at how black holes are formed and how they behave, with potential to destroy the solar system.

Are We Alone? - Hyperspace with Sam Neill (E04):


Archived for educational purposes only. No copyright infringement intended. All rights belong to BBC.

#Hyperspace #SamNeill #BlackHoles #Documentary #Space #BBC

How the Universe Works National Geographic The Universe Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works National Geographic The Universe Space Discovery Documentary ✔ Related Videos:
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Black Holes - Space Documentary 2018HD

Astronomers are probing the high-energy cosmic frontier with a series of key missions: Fermi, Swift, Chandra, NuSTAR, and Hubble. This video was inspired by a NASA event at the National Air and Space Museum, called Our Violent Universe.

You can find a video record of this important event along with full credits at:



Images and audio provided by: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

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