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National Geographic | Exploring the Universe - Documentary

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Journey To The Edge Of The Universe National Geographic, 720p

Egde of Space, A Journey to the edge of the Universe.

A National Geographic Documentary from 2008 in 720p [HD] This is a subject that I really enjoy to watch documentaries of, and I wanted to share this for educational purpose. I think its a extremely interesting subject that can really get your brain working.
The Documentary is of a pretty good quality and I really hope that atleast some people will find this to be of great use to them. And that you might learn something new.

The thumbnail photo used if the same that is used by National Geographic. Its a picture taken with the Hubble Space Telescope and its called: V838 Mon (Light Echo) so it is actually a magnificent real thing.

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

How many planets are in the solar system? How did it form in the Milky Way galaxy? Learn facts about the solar system’s genesis, plus its planets, moons, and asteroids.
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How the Universe Works - The Great Secret of Black Holes - Space Discovery Documentary

A black hole is a mathematically defined region of spacetime exhibiting such a strong gravitational pull that no particle or electromagnetic radiation can escape from it. The theory of
general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass can deform spacetime to form a black hole. The boundary of the region from which no escape is possible is called the event
horizon. Although crossing the event horizon has enormous effect on the fate of the object crossing it, it appears to have no locally detectable features. In many ways a black hole acts like
an ideal black body, as it reflects no light. Moreover, quantum field theory in curved spacetime predicts that event horizons emit Hawking radiation, with the same spectrum as a black
body of a temperature inversely proportional to its mass. This temperature is on the order of billionths of a kelvin for black holes of stellar mass, making it essentially impossible to observe.

Objects whose gravitational fields are too strong for light to escape were first considered in the 18th century by John Michell and Pierre-Simon Laplace. The first modern solution of general
relativity that would characterize a black hole was found by Karl Schwarzschild in 1916, although its interpretation as a region of space from which nothing can escape was first published by
David Finkelstein in 1958. Long considered a mathematical curiosity, it was during the 1960s that theoretical work showed black holes were a generic prediction of general relativity. The discovery
of neutron stars sparked interest in gravitationally collapsed compact objects as a possible astrophysical reality.

Black holes of stellar mass are expected to form when very massive stars collapse at the end of their life cycle. After a black hole has formed, it can continue to grow by absorbing mass from its
surroundings. By absorbing other stars and merging with other black holes, supermassive black holes of millions of solar masses (M☉) may form. There is general consensus that supermassive black
holes exist in the centers of most galaxies.

Despite its invisible interior, the presence of a black hole can be inferred through its interaction with other matter and with electromagnetic radiation such as visible light. Matter falling
onto a black hole can form an accretion disk heated by friction, forming some of the brightest objects in the universe. If there are other stars orbiting a black hole, their orbit can be used
to determine its mass and location. Such observations can be used to exclude possible alternatives (such as neutron stars). In this way, astronomers have identified numerous stellar black hole
candidates in binary systems, and established that the radio source known as Sgr A*, at the core of our own Milky Way galaxy, contains a supermassive black hole of about 4.3 million M☉.
#UniverseDocumentary #Universe #SpaceDocumentary

National Geographic: End of the Universe - Documentary HD

How and when will the Universe end? Gravity and dark matter are poised to annihilate the Universe in a big crunch. Expansion and dark energy may tear it apart. Or, a phase transition could kill us tomorrow in a cosmic death bubble. Thanks for watching Please Like, Share, Comment and Subscribe.
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Origins of the Universe 101 | National Geographic

How old is the universe, and how did it begin? Throughout history, countless myths and scientific theories have tried to explain the universe's origins. The most widely accepted explanation is the big bang theory. Learn about the explosion that started it all and how the universe grew from the size of an atom to encompass everything in existence today.
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About National Geographic:
National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

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Origins of the Universe 101 | National Geographic


National Geographic

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe part 1 - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe part 1 - Space Discovery Documentary
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How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

Explore the biggest question of all. How far do the stars stretch out into space? And what's beyond them? In modern times, we built giant telescopes that have allowed us to cast our gaze deep into the universe. Astronomers have been able to look back to near the time of its birth. They've reconstructed the course of cosmic history in astonishing detail. From intensive computer modeling, and myriad close observations, they've uncovered important clues to its ongoing evolution. Many now conclude that what we can see, the stars and galaxies that stretch out to the limits of our vision, represent only a small fraction of all there is. Does the universe go on forever? Where do we fit within it? And how would the great thinkers have wrapped their brains around the far-out ideas on today's cutting edge? For those who find infinity hard to grasp, even troubling, you're not alone. It's a concept that has long tormented even the best minds. Over two thousand years ago, the Greek mathematician Pythagoras and his followers saw numerical relationships as the key to understanding the world around them. But in their investigation of geometric shapes, they discovered that some important ratios could not be expressed in simple numbers. Take the circumference of a circle to its diameter, called Pi. Computer scientists recently calculated Pi to 5 trillion digits, confirming what the Greeks learned: there are no repeating patterns and no ending in sight. The discovery of the so-called irrational numbers like Pi was so disturbing, legend has it, that one member of the Pythagorian cult, Hippassus, was drowned at sea for divulging their existence. A century later, the philosopher Zeno brought infinity into the open with a series of paradoxes: situations that are true, but strongly counter-intuitive. In this modern update of one of Zeno's paradoxes, say you have arrived at an intersection. But you are only allowed to cross the street in increments of half the distance to the other side. So to cross this finite distance, you must take an infinite number of steps. In math today, it's a given that you can subdivide any length an infinite number of times, or find an infinity of points along a line. What made the idea of infinity so troubling to the Greeks is that it clashed with their goal of using numbers to explain the workings of the real world. To the philosopher Aristotle, a century after Zeno, infinity evoked the formless chaos from which the world was thought to have emerged: a primordial state with no natural laws or limits, devoid of all form and content. But if the universe is finite, what would happen if a warrior traveled to the edge and tossed a spear? Where would it go? It would not fly off on an infinite journey, Aristotle said. Rather, it would join the motion of the stars in a crystalline sphere that encircled the Earth. To preserve the idea of a limited universe, Aristotle would craft an historic distinction. On the one hand, Aristotle pointed to the irrational numbers such as Pi. Each new calculation results in an additional digit, but the final, final number in the string can never be specified. So Aristotle called it potentially infinite. Then there's the actually infinite, like the total number of points or subdivisions along a line. It's literally uncountable. Aristotle reserved the status of actually infinite for the so-called prime mover that created the world and is beyond our capacity to understand. This became the basis for what's called the Cosmological, or First Cause, argument for the existence of God. #universedocumentary #spacedocumentary #Universe

How will the universe end - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

The ultimate fate of the universe is a topic in physical cosmology, whose theoretical restrictions allow possible scenarios for the evolution and ultimate fate of the universe to be described and evaluated. Based on available observational evidence, deciding the fate and evolution of the universe have now become valid cosmological questions, being beyond the mostly untestable constraints of mythological or theological beliefs. Many possible dark futures have been predicted by rival scientific hypotheses, including that the universe might have existed for a finite and infinite duration, or towards explaining the manner and circumstances of its beginning.

Observations made by Edwin Hubble during the 1920s–1950s found that galaxies appeared to be moving away from each other, leading to the currently accepted Big Bang theory. This suggests that the universe began–very small and very dense–about 13.8 billion years ago, and it has expanded and (on average) become less dense ever since. Confirmation of the Big Bang mostly depends on knowing the rate of expansion, average density of matter, and the physical properties of the mass–energy in the universe.

There is a strong consensus among cosmologists that the universe is flat (see Shape of the universe) and will continue to expand forever.

Factors that need to be considered in determining the universe's origin and ultimate fate include: the average motions of galaxies, the shape and structure of the universe, and the amount of dark matter and dark energy that the universe contains.

It is possible that the destruction of the universe may entail the complete cessation of time and reality.

How the Universe Works - National Geographic The Universe - Space Discovery Documentary

The Big Bang theory is the prevailing cosmological model for the observable universe from the earliest known periods through its subsequent large-scale evolution. The model describes how the universe expanded from a very high-density and high-temperature state, and offers a comprehensive explanation for a broad range of phenomena, including the abundance of light elements, the cosmic microwave background , large scale structure and Hubble's law (the farther away galaxies are, the faster they are moving away from Earth). If the observed conditions are extrapolated backwards in time using the known laws of physics, the prediction is that just before a period of very high density there was a singularity which is typically associated with the Big Bang. Physicists are undecided whether this means the universe began from a singularity, or that current knowledge is insufficient to describe the universe at that time. Detailed measurements of the expansion rate of the universe place the Big Bang at around 13.8 billion years ago, which is thus considered the age of the universe.After its initial expansion, the universe cooled sufficiently to allow the formation of subatomic particles, and later simple atoms. Giant clouds of these primordial elements (mostly hydrogen, with some helium and lithium) later coalesced through gravity, eventually forming early stars and galaxies, the descendants of which are visible today. Astronomers also observe the gravitational effects of dark matter surrounding galaxies. Though most of the mass in the universe seems to be in the form of dark matter, Big Bang theory and various observations seem to indicate that it is not made out of conventional baryonic matter (protons, neutrons, and electrons) but it is unclear exactly what it is made out of.

Since Georges Lemaître first noted in 1927 that an expanding universe could be traced back in time to an originating single point, scientists have built on his idea of cosmic expansion. The scientific community was once divided between supporters of two different theories, the Big Bang and the Steady State theory, but a wide range of empirical evidence has strongly favored the Big Bang which is now universally accepted. In 1929, from analysis of galactic redshifts, Edwin Hubble concluded that galaxies are drifting apart; this is important observational evidence consistent with the hypothesis of an expanding universe. In 1964, the cosmic microwave background radiation was discovered, which was crucial evidence in favor of the Big Bang model, since that theory predicted the existence of background radiation throughout the universe before it was discovered. More recently, measurements of the redshifts of supernovae indicate that the expansion of the universe is accelerating, an observation attributed to dark energy's existence. The known physical laws of nature can be used to calculate the characteristics of the universe in detail back in time to an initial state of extreme density and temperature.
#Universe #Space #Documentary

How the Universe Works - From The Big Bang To The Present Day - Space Discovery Documentary

How the Universe Works - From The Big Bang To The Present Day - Space Discovery Documentary
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Aliens in Space and Universe National Geographic Documentary 2016 HD

National Documentaries Channel
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Dark Universe 101 | National Geographic

Of all the great unknowns in outer space, the dark universe might just be the most mysterious. Learn the basics of dark energy and dark matter and how scientists study this nearly undetectable realm of the cosmos.
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About National Geographic:
National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

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Official Site:
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Dark Universe 101 | National Geographic


National Geographic

JOURNEY TO THE EDGE OF THE (observable) UNIVERSE 720p w/ Alec Baldwin

Voyage on images taken from the Hubble telescope. Explore the science and history behind the distant celestial bodies in the solar system.
Narrated by Alec Baldwin
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National Geographic 2018 The Biggest Scientific Discoveries of 2017 Documentary

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Where did we come from? - Science Documentary with Neil DeGrasse Tyson

Where did we come from? - Science Documentary 2016 with Neil DeGrasse Tyson
Did the entire human race originate in Africa? Are people from different parts of the world related to each other? How similar are humans to chimpanzees? Gene experts look into all these questions by studying DNA.

Explore The Cosmos With Morgan Freeman(full documentary)HD -VeVo-

-VeVo- weekly compilation of the best funny fails from 2016! With black flip tricks gone wrong, stupid tricks trapeze, kids getting owned railroad jump fails, return home FRONT FLIP hit gone wrong and better fault 2016 | Funny Compilation Fail documentaries, full documentaries in Spanish, documentaries 2016 documentary national geographic, documentary discovery channel in Spanish, documentary discovery channel, animal documentaries, documentaries hd, bbc documentaries, documentary 2016, universe documentary, documentary animals, documentary hd , Spanish documentary,
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The Academy Award nominee Cosmic Voyage combines live action with state-of-the-art computer-generated imagery to pinpoint where humans fit in our .

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National Geographic | Biggest Things in the Universe - Documentary HD 1080p

National Geographic | Biggest Things in the Universe - Documentary HD 1080p
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