This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

Nations Worth Dying For? National Identities and the Coming of the Great War, Dr. Pierre Purseigle

x

Nations Worth Dying For? National Identities and the Coming of the Great War - Pierre Purseigle

Dr. Pierre Purseigle, historian and President of the International Society for First World War Studies, discusses the evolution of national identity and nationalism in prewar Europe, the differences between national identity and nationalism, and the changing relationship between empires, states, and their subjects/citizens.

Presented at the World War I Historical Association Symposium, The Coming of the Great War, November 8-9, 2013.

Recorded November 9, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit
x

The Forgotten Realm on the Eve of the Great War: Austria-Hungary in July 1914 - John Deak

Dr. John Deak, University of Notre Dame, discusses the Austro-Hungarian Empire during July of 1914, challenging traditional concepts of Austria-Hungary's doomed existence and the conglomerate state's complex position in Eastern Europe.

The lecture is part of the Hesburgh Lecture Series and is presented in partnership with the Notre Dame Club of Kansas City.

Recorded April 13, 2014 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum and Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit
x

Germany and the Outbreak of WWI Reconsidered - Michael Epkenhans

Dr. Michael Epkenhans, professor and Director of Historical Research at the Centre for Military History and Social Sciences of the German Armed Forces at Potsdam, presents, Germany and the Outbreak of WWI Reconsidered.

Presented July 27, 2014 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit
x

The Evolution of Warfare to 1914 - Nicholas Murray

Dr. Nicholas Murray, historian and author of The Rocky Road to the Great War: The Evolution of Trench Warfare to 1914, discusses the evolution of defensive and offensive tactics and armaments in the lead up to the Great War, including the experience of armies in wars during the decades leading up to World War I and how this experience shaped tactical thinking at the start of the war.

Presented at the World War I Historical Association Symposium, The Coming of the Great War, November 8-9, 2013.

Recorded November 8, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit
x

American Humanitarianism in France During the Great War Era - Julia Irwin

During the Great War era, France became an epicenter of American humanitarian concern and activity. Between 1914 and 1918, millions of American men and women participated in a collective effort to aid France’s wounded soldiers and to assist French civilians behind the front lines. For several years after the hostilities ended, Americans continued to provide humanitarian assistance to French children, refugees, and returning soldiers. In Versailles and Paris during 1919, French and U.S. citizens also collaborated to establish new international humanitarian organizations, designed to prevent future suffering. The legacies of their actions remain with us today, one hundred years later.

Presented during Modern Foundations: The Treaty of Versailles and American Philanthropy, a WWI Centennial Symposium at the Palace of Versailles on June 28, 2019.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Industrial Behemoth, Cultural Icon, Corrupted Arbiter: Press of the Gilded Age - Ross Collins

Dr. Ross Collins, historian and author of Children, War, and Propaganda, discusses the power and venality of the Gilded Age industrial journalism in three of the most powerful allied nations: France, Britain, and the United States.

Presented at the World War I Historical Association Symposium, The Coming of the Great War, November 8-9, 2013.

Recorded November 8, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

The Road to Hell? Intentions, Uncertainty and the Origins of World War I - Sebastian Rosato

A century after the outbreak of World War I, there is still little consensus on its causes. The lessons learned are of particular importance for the United States and the world today. University of Notre Dame Professor Sebastian Rosato specializes in the theory and history of great power politics and will question established explanations and develop new arguments about the causes of the Great War.

The event is part of the Hesburgh Lecture Series and is presented in partnership with the Notre Dame Club of Kansas City.

Recorded April 19, 2015 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

The Outbreak of War in 1914: New Ways to Think About the 'Road to War' - Michael Neiberg

Dr. Michael Neiberg, historian and author of Dance of the Furies: Europe and the Outbreak of War in 1914, discusses a more nuanced approach to thinking about the road to war, moving beyond the traditional explanation of MAIN (Militarism, Alliances, Imperialism, and Nationalism).

Presented at the World War I Historical Association Symposium, The Coming of the Great War, November 8-9, 2013.

Recorded November 8, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Poilu: The Notebooks of Corporal Louis Barthas - Edward Strauss

“If we suffered so stoically, without raising useless complaints, don’t let anyone tell you that it was because of patriotism, or to defend the rights of peoples to live their own lives, or to end all wars…”

Along with millions of other Frenchmen, Louis Barthas, was conscripted to fight the Germans in the opening days of World War I. Ed Strauss, former publisher of MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History, vividly brings Barthas’ frontline experiences to life through the first English translation of his notebooks, which describe riveting wartime experiences of near-ceaseless combat in some of the fiercest French battles: Artois, Flanders, Champagne, Verdun, the Somme and the Argonne. This quintessential memoir of a “poilu,” is a journey directly into the heart of the Great War.

Recorded March 4, 2015 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

The Backwash of War: Ellen N. La Motte and her Explosive Lost Classic - Cynthia Wachtell

Boldly capturing World War I’s devastation, writer and suffragist Ellen N. La Motte penned her controversial book, The Backwash of War, about her experiences as a nurse on the Western Front. Modeling a new and influential style of war writing, her biting prose was banned in England and France upon its publication in 1916, and later censored in the U.S. by the book’s publisher upon the postmaster’s urging. Join professor Cynthia Wachtell for a discussion on the contentious text and incredible story of its author based upon Wachtell’s book The Backwash of War: An Extraordinary American Nurse in World War I.

Presented in partnership with the National Archives at Kansas City and the UMKC Women’s Center.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit
x

THE BRITISH HOME FRONT 17 | Refugees - Pierre Purseigle

Welcome to the BRITISH HOME FRONT IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR. This series was recorded at the UNIVERSITY OF ST ANDREWS in June 2018 to accompany a conference marking the contribution by the peoples of the British Isles to the national war effort.

In this podcast, DR PIERRE PURSEIGLE, Associate Professor of Modern History, UNIVERSITY OF WARWICK, talks about how the Home Front coped with the influx of refugees during the First World War.

IMAGE | Belgian refugees in 1914 - By Unknown I f.ex. Jan Dąbrowski Wielka wojna (The Great War) Warsaw 1937, Public Domain, commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3301725.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
With thanks to JOHN CAWTHORN and the 1926 FOUNDATION for making this podcast series possible, and to the DEPARTMENT FOR DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA AND SPORT and the SCOTTISH GOVERNMENT for supporting the Conference.

PRODUCTION | ChromeRadio for the UNIVERSITY OF ST ANDREWS | Music performed by the PIPES AND DRUMS of the ROYAL SCOTS DRAGOON GUARDS | Series Editor - Professor Sir Hew Strachan | Producer - Catriona Oliphant | Post-production - Chris Sharp.

War of Words, Words of War: European Culture on the Eve of War - Dr. Martha Hanna

Dr. Martha Hanna, historian and author of The Mobilization of Intellect: French Scholars and Writers during the Great War, discusses the cultural tension in prewar Europe between ardent nationalism and cultural internationalism.

Presented at the World War I Historical Association Symposium, The Coming of the Great War, November 8-9, 2013.

Recorded November 8, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

World War 1 & Muslim and Loyalist Identity

This ground-breaking project in Belfast aimed to create better integration and understanding between the city’s Muslim and Loyalist communities through the unlikely medium of the First World War centenary.

The project, from thinktank British Future and New Horizons in British Islam, working with the Mitchell Institute at Queen’s University engages Belfast’s Muslim and Loyalist communities to raise awareness of the common history of WW1 contribution shared by both groups living in Belfast today.

1.5 million soldiers from undivided India fought for Britain in the First World War, 400,000 of them Muslim soldiers from what is now Pakistan.

After workshops exploring British and Northern Irish identity and its connection to the First World War, and the contribution of commonwealth soldiers to the armies of 1914-18, the two groups came together to meet and discuss this new common ground of shared history - building new trust and understanding between two communities that have previously had little contact with each other.


For more information please see

Is Nationalism Useful to the Citizens or the Leaders?

Have you ever stopped to really think about why you love your country?

Nationalism ensures that a country's leaders can do just about anything as long as they wave a flag and salute dead troops, but does nationalism serve any other purpose besides encouraging national defense? Is it useful to the individual citizen?

Pride in one's culture is not the issue. The issue is believing one's fellow countrymen somehow rank higher than the rest of the people of the world. The issue is complaining about people helping homeless foreigners instead of homeless countrymen. What's the difference?

Shares

x

Check Also

x

Menu