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Nations Worth Dying For? National Identities and the Coming of the Great War, Dr. Pierre Purseigle

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"Nations Worth Dying For? National Identities and the Coming of the Great War," Dr. Pierre Purseigle

Dr. Pierre Purseigle, historian and President of the International Society for First World War Studies, discusses the evolution of national identity and nationalism in prewar Europe, the differences between national identity and nationalism, and the changing relationship between empires, states, and their subjects/citizens.

Presented at the World War I Historical Association Symposium, The Coming of the Great War, November 8-9, 2013.

Recorded November 9, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit
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"Industrial Behemoth, Cultural Icon, Corrupted Arbiter: Press of the Gilded Age," Dr. Ross Collins

Dr. Ross Collins, historian and author of Children, War, and Propaganda, discusses the power and venality of the Gilded Age industrial journalism in three of the most powerful allied nations: France, Britain, and the United States.

Presented at the World War I Historical Association Symposium, The Coming of the Great War, November 8-9, 2013.

Recorded November 8, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit
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"The Road to Hell? Intentions, Uncertainty and the Origins of World War I," Dr. Sebastian Rosato

A century after the outbreak of World War I, there is still little consensus on its causes. The lessons learned are of particular importance for the United States and the world today. University of Notre Dame Professor Sebastian Rosato specializes in the theory and history of great power politics and will question established explanations and develop new arguments about the causes of the Great War.

The event is part of the Hesburgh Lecture Series and is presented in partnership with the Notre Dame Club of Kansas City.

Recorded April 19, 2015 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit
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THE BRITISH HOME FRONT 17 | Refugees - Pierre Purseigle

Welcome to the BRITISH HOME FRONT IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR. This series was recorded at the UNIVERSITY OF ST ANDREWS in June 2018 to accompany a conference marking the contribution by the peoples of the British Isles to the national war effort.

In this podcast, DR PIERRE PURSEIGLE, Associate Professor of Modern History, UNIVERSITY OF WARWICK, talks about how the Home Front coped with the influx of refugees during the First World War.

IMAGE | Belgian refugees in 1914 - By Unknown I f.ex. Jan Dąbrowski Wielka wojna (The Great War) Warsaw 1937, Public Domain, commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3301725.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
With thanks to JOHN CAWTHORN and the 1926 FOUNDATION for making this podcast series possible, and to the DEPARTMENT FOR DIGITAL, CULTURE, MEDIA AND SPORT and the SCOTTISH GOVERNMENT for supporting the Conference.

PRODUCTION | ChromeRadio for the UNIVERSITY OF ST ANDREWS | Music performed by the PIPES AND DRUMS of the ROYAL SCOTS DRAGOON GUARDS | Series Editor - Professor Sir Hew Strachan | Producer - Catriona Oliphant | Post-production - Chris Sharp.
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Doughboy Meets World: The American Soldier and the Europeans 1917-1918 - Richard S. Faulkner

World War I marked the first-time vast numbers of Americans came into close contact with peoples and cultures in foreign lands. By the time of the Armistice, over two million Doughboys were serving in France and Britain and several thousand of these soldiers went on to serve in the Army of Occupation in the German Rhineland. This lecture will examine the Doughboys' interactions with, and opinions of, the European soldiers and civilians that they encountered while serving in the American Expeditionary Forces. It will also explore how these interactions shaped the Doughboys' perceptions of being Americans.

Richard S. Faulkner, General William H. Stofft Chair of Military History of the United States Army Command and General Staff College

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

"The Forgotten Realm on the Eve of the Great War: Austria-Hungary in July 1914," Dr. John Deak

Dr. John Deak, University of Notre Dame, discusses the Austro-Hungarian Empire during July of 1914, challenging traditional concepts of Austria-Hungary's doomed existence and the conglomerate state's complex position in Eastern Europe.

The lecture is part of the Hesburgh Lecture Series and is presented in partnership with the Notre Dame Club of Kansas City.

Recorded April 13, 2014 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum and Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

"The Outbreak of War in 1914: New Ways to Think About the 'Road to War,'" Dr. Michael Neiberg

Dr. Michael Neiberg, historian and author of Dance of the Furies: Europe and the Outbreak of War in 1914, discusses a more nuanced approach to thinking about the road to war, moving beyond the traditional explanation of MAIN (Militarism, Alliances, Imperialism, and Nationalism).

Presented at the World War I Historical Association Symposium, The Coming of the Great War, November 8-9, 2013.

Recorded November 8, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

"The Marne, 1914," Dr. Holger Herwig

The First Battle of the Marne was the battle that halted the advance of the German Army across northern France in the fall of 1914. With the advance halted the German and Allied armies dug in to hold their ground, thus setting the stage for the bloody stalemate that would exist for the near entirety of World War I on the Western Front.

Dr. Holger Herwig, professor and Canada Research Chair in Military and Strategic Studies at the University of Calgary, discusses the development of, the key individuals involved, and the attitudes surrounding the battle he argues to be the most decisive land battle since Waterloo.

Recorded November 10, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

"Paris, 1919: Six Months That Changed the World," Dr. Margaret MacMillan

Dr. Margaret MacMillan, historian and author of Paris, 1919: Six Months That Changed the World, discusses the Paris Peace Conference, the significance of the decisions made in Paris, and how the those decisions continue to affect the world today.

Recorded May 25, 2007 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

"The Evolution of Warfare, to 1914," Dr. Nicholas Murray

Dr. Nicholas Murray, historian and author of The Rocky Road to the Great War: The Evolution of Trench Warfare to 1914, discusses the evolution of defensive and offensive tactics and armaments in the lead up to the Great War, including the experience of armies in wars during the decades leading up to World War I and how this experience shaped tactical thinking at the start of the war.

Presented at the World War I Historical Association Symposium, The Coming of the Great War, November 8-9, 2013.

Recorded November 8, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit
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"Tides, Tectonic Plates & Talismans All Over Again," Dr. Gary Armstrong

Dr. Gary Armstrong, Professor of Political Science at William Jewell College, describes and critiques the reemerging debate among political scientists over the causes of World War I, including the role of structural factors and the shift in the global balance of power.

Presented at the World War I Historical Association Symposium, The Coming of the Great War, November 8-9, 2013.

Recorded November 9, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Leadership and the French Mutinies of 1917 - Ethan Rafuse

Beginning in late May 1917, open mutiny swept through much of the French Army. Dr. Ethan Rafuse shares the remarkable feat of personal leadership of Henri Petain to restore discipline to the French Army and how this military uprising reflected deeper divisions in French society in 1917 and its enduring effect on France's history for decades to come. The John J. Pershing Lecture Series is presented in partnership with the Command and General Staff College Foundation.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

World War 1 & Muslim and Loyalist Identity

This ground-breaking project in Belfast aimed to create better integration and understanding between the city’s Muslim and Loyalist communities through the unlikely medium of the First World War centenary.

The project, from thinktank British Future and New Horizons in British Islam, working with the Mitchell Institute at Queen’s University engages Belfast’s Muslim and Loyalist communities to raise awareness of the common history of WW1 contribution shared by both groups living in Belfast today.

1.5 million soldiers from undivided India fought for Britain in the First World War, 400,000 of them Muslim soldiers from what is now Pakistan.

After workshops exploring British and Northern Irish identity and its connection to the First World War, and the contribution of commonwealth soldiers to the armies of 1914-18, the two groups came together to meet and discuss this new common ground of shared history - building new trust and understanding between two communities that have previously had little contact with each other.


For more information please see

"Poilu: The Notebooks of Corporal Louis Barthas," Edward Strauss

“If we suffered so stoically, without raising useless complaints, don’t let anyone tell you that it was because of patriotism, or to defend the rights of peoples to live their own lives, or to end all wars…”

Along with millions of other Frenchmen, Louis Barthas, was conscripted to fight the Germans in the opening days of World War I. Ed Strauss, former publisher of MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History, vividly brings Barthas’ frontline experiences to life through the first English translation of his notebooks, which describe riveting wartime experiences of near-ceaseless combat in some of the fiercest French battles: Artois, Flanders, Champagne, Verdun, the Somme and the Argonne. This quintessential memoir of a “poilu,” is a journey directly into the heart of the Great War.

Recorded March 4, 2015 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Coloquio 1WW Conferencia Inaugural de Pierre Purseigle

Geographies of belligerence. Toward a global history of the First World War.
Pierre Purseigle. Biblioteca de México 26 de Junio de 2014
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The Eastern Front | National Perspectives: Austria-Hungary, Germany and Russia

Dr. Richard Faulkner, Command and General Staff College, serves as moderator of a panel discussion on the Eastern Front in World War I. Dr. Scott Stephenson, Dr. Graydon Tunstall and Dr. Bruce Menning provide expertise on the Eastern Front in the national perspectives of Austria-Hungary, Germany and Russia.

Recorded April 13, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

WWI New Perspectives: The Historian and the Centenary

Video is part of the World War I New Perspectives series originally published by Oxford in 2012:

Important questions, problems, and challenges pertaining to the role historians and scholars will play in the centenary of the First World War.

Presented by Dr Pierre Purseigle, Senior Lecturer in Modern History at the University of
Birmingham and President of the International Society for First World War Studies.

Videos have been released under a creative commons license (attribution, non-commercial, share alike).

Collaboration, Liaison, and the Legacy of the Meuse-Argonne, 1918

Society for Military History 2014 Conference at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

"War of Words, Words of War: European Culture on the Eve of War," Dr. Martha Hanna

Dr. Martha Hanna, historian and author of The Mobilization of Intellect: French Scholars and Writers during the Great War, discusses the cultural tension in prewar Europe between ardent nationalism and cultural internationalism.

Presented at the World War I Historical Association Symposium, The Coming of the Great War, November 8-9, 2013.

Recorded November 8, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Changing National Identities at the Frontier Texas and New Mexico, 1800 1850

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