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Pakistan After Bin Laden

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Did the Pakistani Military Know that Osama Bin Laden was There Hiding Out?

From the 2013 Aspen Ideas Festival session Pakistan at a Crossroads.

With the accelerated US drawdown of forces in Afghanistan, what lies ahead for Pakistan? What remain the greatest threats to stability in Pakistan? How can the international community play a positive role in Pakistan's economic development and political stability? Is there a substantial role for the United States?

Featuring Stanley A. McChrystal, Husain Haqqani, and David Ignatius
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Leon Panetta on what Pakistan knew about Osama Bin Laden

With 12ft walls, enormous footprint, and conspicuous location, al-Qaeda leader Osama Bin Laden’s Abottabad compound probably raised suspicions in Pakistan, says former Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta in an interview with Judy Woodruff. Panetta was CIA director during the raid on Bin Laden’s compound, and transmitted President Obama’s order to go ahead with the operation.

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U.S. and Pakistan: Will a Strategic Partnership Falter After Bin Laden Raid?

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After bin Laden was killed by U.S. forces during a raid in Abbottabad, tensions are on the rise between the U.S. and Pakistan. Ray Suarez discusses the future of U.S.-Pakistan relations with former U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan Wendy Chamberlin and Lawrence Wright, author of a book that focuses on the origins of al-Qaida.
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Musharraf at CFR: Is Osama bin Laden in Pakistan?

Pervez Musharraf, former president of Pakistan, discusses how the U.S.-India relationship affects Pakistan, as well as Pakistan's relationship with neighboring countries and the fight against terrorism.
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Osama bin Laden compound, morning after U.S. raid

CBS News RAW: New video shows Osama bin Laden's compound near the Pakistani capital of Islamabad, the morning after he was killed during a U.S. military operation.

Osama bin Laden Photo: US-Pakistan Relationship at Risk?


Jon Karl questions Joe Heck, Congressman from the 3rd District of Nevada, on relationship with Pakistan, Osama bin Laden double tap death photos, and statements from the White House.

Targeting Pakistan on Death of Osama Bin Laden: Sh. Ravishankar Prasad: 02.05.2011

Obama Rules Out Involving Pakistan In Raid On Osama Bin Laden's Hideout | Terroristan Exposed Again

Former US President Barack Obama in his memoir exposed Pakistan. Obama exposed Pakistan & its links with terror groups. Barack Obama has said that he had ruled out involving Pakistan in the raid on Osama Bin Laden's hideout because it was an open secret that certain elements inside Pakistan's military, and especially its intelligence services, maintained links to the Taliban and perhaps even Al-Qaeda, sometimes using them as strategic assets against Afghanistan and India. For more, watch the full show.

#BarackObama #Pakistan #IndiaFirst

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WHERE IN THE WORLD IS OSAMA BIN LADEN - Pakistan Clip with Morgan Spurlock

Morgan Spurlock hunting for Osama bin Laden in Pakistan. Where in the World is Osama bin Laden is yours to own now:

Fmr CIA Islamabad Chief on Pakistan's Bin Laden Dossier

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Robert Grenier talks to Al Jazeera from Washington DC, discussing the leaked report about US raid in Pakistan that killed Bin Laden. The operation also caused deaths of three Pakistani citizens while violating the nation's airspace.

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Pakistan PM Imran Khan calls Osama Bin Laden a 'martyr' in National Assembly

Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan sparked a row calling terrorist Osama Bin Laden a “shaheed” in the parliament saying Islamabad should never have taken part in the US-led ‘war on terror’. America came inside Pakistan and killed and martyred Osama Bin Laden. After which all the countries cursed us. Pakistan has faced humiliation for many years in war on terror, said Imran Khan in National Assembly.

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Bin Laden toys prove hit with Pakistani children

1. Wide shot of Karachi city (night shot)
2. Wide shot of shopping centre
3. Two people looking at a Christmas tree in shop window
4. Various of Christmas decorations
5. Wide shot of a boy in a toy shop looking at a handheld video game called Bin Laden vs. Bush
6. Close-up of the video game toy
7. Various shots of toy shop
8. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Mansoor Ahmed, shopkeeper:
This toy and all the other ones like it are being imported from China. They are much in demand right now. Everyone seems to really enjoy them.
9. Various shots of shopkeeper demonstrating a battery-powered toy Pakistan Army jeep which has a figurine of Osama bin Laden and two soldiers or bodyguards standing on back of it
10. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Mohammed Ilyas, eight-year old boy:
This jeep is really great, its got flashing lights, this is Osama Bin Laden and here are his troops.
11. Various shots of toys in shop
12. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Khalid Shafiq, parent:
The reason these toys are so popular is that he (Osama) is an Islamic hero and so people like him very much. People I know are naming their children after him.
13. Wide of toy shop with a customer holding an Osama bin Laden jeep
14. Various of children playing with toy jeep

STORYLINE:

A new range of video games and battery powered toys featuring Saudi militant Osama bin Laden are proving to be a big hit with children in Pakistan this December.

Some shops in the markets and shopping centres of Karachi have Christmas decorations in their windows -- although a Muslim nation, Pakistan has a sizeable Christian minority.

But there are number of gifts on sale in the city's toy shops this month that are unlikely to be finding their way into the Christmas stockings of too many children in other countries around the world.

One store is selling an imported electronic game called Laden versus Bush.

The shopkeeper has been getting these toys in from abroad and they are selling fast.

Another toy that's driving the kids crazy is a battery powered jeep, described by it's packaging as a bump-and-go period combat set.

On the back of the jeep stands a figurine of the world's most wanted man, Osama bin Laden, flanked by a pair of well-armed soldiers.

So perhaps the toy shows Osama having been captured by bold Pakistani forces -- the government of Pakistan is a key ally in US President George W Bush's War on Terror.

But that's not the way all the children playing with the toys see it. Some think the troops are Osama's own al-Qaida forces.

The children playing with these toys are mostly too young to know much about the figure standing on the back of the jeep and their perception of the toys and Osama himself depends largely on the adults buying the presents.

Bin Laden, a Saudi multi-millionaire who was the alleged mastermind of the September 11 attacks on the United States, continues to be seen by some in Pakistan as an admirable figure.


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Pakistan surprised bin Laden was hiding near Islamabad

Terrell Brown spoke with Lara Logan on how the Pakistani people felt after finding out Osama bin Laden had been living near Islamabad before he was killed in a fortified compound by U.S. forces.

John Bolton: Was the mission that killed Osama Bin Laden in Pakistan a crime of aggression?

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5. (SOUNDBITE) (English) PRESIDENT TRUMP''S U.S. NATIONAL SECURITY ADVISER JOHN BOLTON CONTINUING TO READ FROM HIS STATEMENT ABOUT THE ICC: Edit No: 1195The - quote - ''crime of aggression'' could become a pretext for politically-motivated investigations. Was the mission of U.S. Navy SEALs that killed Osama bin Laden in Pakistan a crime of aggression? What about the U.S. coalition airstrikes in Syria to protect innocent children from chemical weapons? How about U.S. military exercises with allies and partners around the world? Or Israel''s actions to defend itself on countless occasions?

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Pakistan PM calls Osama Bin Laden a 'martyr' in National Assembly

Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan on June 25, in the National Assembly, referred to Osama Bin Laden as a martyr.
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PAKISTAN: MUSHARRAF WILLING TO DISCUSS BIN LADEN

English/Nat

Pakistan's military ruler says he is willing to talk to Afghanistan's ruling Taliban militia in a bid to resolve the issue of Osama bin Laden.

The suspected terrorist is wanted for trial by the United States in connection with last year's bombings of American embassies in Kenya and Tanzania.

General Pervaiz Musharraf also says he will press ahead with a corruption trial for former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, the man he deposed in a bloodless military coup last month.

General Musharraf spoke to A-P television just moments after three separate blasts shook the Pakistani capital.

SOUNDBITE: (English)
Frankly I would not be able to comment on it, I have barely had a moment to give it any thought. I have just initiated some actions. The first thing I have done is to tell the (state-run) T-V and the radio not to go and cover it up. Such incidents shouldn't be covered up. When you can see it all anyway on B-B-C and Z-T-V, but P-T-V is quiet or giving all sorts of other news. This is something which has happened here which is quite serious and we will investigate it. People must be investigating it right now. They will have to come back to me and I would like to discuss it with them. But until then I can not comment. I don't even know exactly where all three blasts have taken place and under what circumstances. So I can't comment on it.
SUPER CAPTION: General Pervaiz Musharraf, Pakistan's Military Ruler

Musharraf said terrorism went against the basis of Islam.

SOUNDBITE: (English)
I have been quite clearly saying that we are against all forms of terrorism and especially the using of religion for promoting terrorism which goes against our religion and gives it a bad name. So to that extent I would like to contribute to the combat of terrorism in whatever forms.
(Off camera: Even if it means capturing Osama Bin Laden?)
If he's involved in terrorism yes surely I would like to negotiate with the Afghan government or whatever on how this can be resolved. I would like to get into the realities of this issue and deal with the Taliban towards its resolution.
SUPER CAPTION: General Pervaiz Musharraf, Pakistan's Military Ruler

But he said U-N sanctions against Afghanistan would only hurt the country's many poor.

SOUNDBITE: (English)
I don't know what sanctions are being imposed really, but I think it's sad that a country that needs to be developed, that needs help in terms of development of its infrastructure -- its broken down infrastructure -- would be put under such sanctions. However I would like to play my role, in however a way I can, with the Taliban to see how a compromise can be reached so these sanctions will not be implemented.
SUPER CAPTION: General Pervaiz Musharraf, Pakistan's Military Ruler

Musharraf also insists any trial for former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif will be fair.

SOUNDBITE: (English)
I would like to assure the world and everyone who is wondering that it will be open and it will be a very fair trial. I will ensure that.
(Off camera: Are we going to see any more corruption cases?)
Well, we haven't really filed any corruption cases as yet. The national accountability bureau is looking through all the cases. As I said we are having an across the board look at everything and we are starting from the top. I haven't had a session with the Accountability Bureau. They still have to come to me and inform me exactly about the cases against the ex-prime minister and his family.
SUPER CAPTION: General Pervaiz Musharraf, Pakistan's Military Ruler


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Hillary Clinton recounts bin Laden raid

Secretary Clinton recalls the tense atmosphere in the White House during the raid on Osama bin Laden's Pakistan compound.

Bin Laden toys prove hit with Pakistani children

1. Wide shot of Karachi city (night shot)
2. Wide shot of shopping centre
3. Two people looking at a Christmas tree in shop window
4. Various of Christmas decorations
5. Wide shot of a boy in a toy shop looking at a handheld video game called Bin Laden vs. Bush
6. Close-up of the video game toy
7. Various shots of toy shop
8. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Mansoor Ahmed, shopkeeper:
This toy and all the other ones like it are being imported from China. They are much in demand right now. Everyone seems to really enjoy them.
9. Various shots of shopkeeper demonstrating a battery-powered toy Pakistan Army jeep which has a figurine of Osama bin Laden and two soldiers or bodyguards standing on back of it
10. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Mohammed Ilyas, eight-year old boy:
This jeep is really great, its got flashing lights, this is Osama Bin Laden and here are his troops.
11. Various shots of toys in shop
12. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Khalid Shafiq, parent:
The reason these toys are so popular is that he (Osama) is an Islamic hero and so people like him very much. People I know are naming their children after him.
13. Wide of toy shop with a customer holding an Osama bin Laden jeep
14. Various of children playing with toy jeep

STORYLINE:

A new range of video games and battery powered toys featuring Saudi militant Osama bin Laden are proving to be a big hit with children in Pakistan this December.

Some shops in the markets and shopping centres of Karachi have Christmas decorations in their windows -- although a Muslim nation, Pakistan has a sizeable Christian minority.

But there are number of gifts on sale in the city's toy shops this month that are unlikely to be finding their way into the Christmas stockings of too many children in other countries around the world.

One store is selling an imported electronic game called Laden versus Bush.

The shopkeeper has been getting these toys in from abroad and they are selling fast.

Another toy that's driving the kids crazy is a battery powered jeep, described by it's packaging as a bump-and-go period combat set.

On the back of the jeep stands a figurine of the world's most wanted man, Osama bin Laden, flanked by a pair of well-armed soldiers.

So perhaps the toy shows Osama having been captured by bold Pakistani forces -- the government of Pakistan is a key ally in US President George W Bush's War on Terror.

But that's not the way all the children playing with the toys see it. Some think the troops are Osama's own al-Qaida forces.

The children playing with these toys are mostly too young to know much about the figure standing on the back of the jeep and their perception of the toys and Osama himself depends largely on the adults buying the presents.

Bin Laden, a Saudi multi-millionaire who was the alleged mastermind of the September 11 attacks on the United States, continues to be seen by some in Pakistan as an admirable figure.


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Osama bin Laden 'not invited' to Pakistan says Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani

Pakistan's Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani restates his country's denials of complicity with al-Qaeda and Osama bin Laden.

Musharraf commenting on Osama bin Laden

1. Pakistan's President General Pervez Musharraf walking down the stairs with Dutch officials and walking to podium
2. Cutaway Pakistani Information minister Sheikh Rashid Ahmed
3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Gen. Pervez Musharraf, Pakistani President (answering about evidence gathered by Pakistani authorities to claim that Osama bin Laden is alive):
Evidence is interrogation of people that we have apprehended and also there was technological evidence, it's a combination of both.
4. Mid shot of Pakistani officials
5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Gen. Pervez Musharraf, Pakistani President (answering about evidence gathered by Pakistani authorities to claim that Osama bin Laden is alive):
We have a lot of intelligence, intelligence is human intelligence as evidence, is technological intelligence and aerial surveillance, all combined you produce an intelligence picture, and that's how it happened and other than that, as I said, interrogation details of important personalities who we apprehended.
(Question: So you know where he is right now?)
No, no, I don't know where he (Osama bin Laden) is, I wish I knew. (laughs)
6. Wide of Musharraf at podium with Dutch officials

STORYLINE:

Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf said on Monday that interrogations and technological intelligence suggested that Al Qaida leader Osama bin Laden was still alive.

Evidence is interrogation of people that we have apprehended and also there was technological evidence, Musharraf told the press in the Hague, when asked about Bin Laden's fate.

But despite all the intelligence, Musharraf said he was uncertain about bin Laden whereabouts. Oh no, I don't know where he is, he said. I wish I did.

President Musharraf hailed the killing of Amjad Hussain Farooqi on Sunday as a breakthrough and predicted it would lead to
more high-profile al-Qaida arrests.

Shot dead during a four-hour gunbattle after vowing never to surrender, Farooqi was wanted for his alleged role in the 2002 kidnapping and beheading of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl and in two assassination attempts on Musharraf in December 2003. Three other Pakistanis, one of them an Islamic cleric, were arrested.

Pakistan has arrested more than 600 al-Qaida suspects, including several senior figures in the terror network. Many have been handed over to U.S. authorities.

Al-Qaida chief Osama bin Laden and his No. 2, Ayman al-Zawahri, are both believed to be hiding in the mountains between Pakistan and Afghanistan, though there has been no hard evidence of their location for years.

Musharraf's decision to ally Pakistan with Washington's campaign against international terrorism has enraged Islamic militants, and police stepped up patrols Monday in case of a backlash over Farooqi's death in Nawabshah, a town about 125 miles north of Karachi.


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