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Pakistan demolishes bin Laden hideout

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Al-Qaeda | Wikipedia audio article

This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article:
Al-Qaeda

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The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.
- Socrates



SUMMARY
=======
Al-Qaeda (; Arabic: القاعدة‎ al-qāʿidah, IPA: [ælqɑːʕɪdɐ], translation: The Base, The Foundation or The Fundament and alternatively spelled al-Qaida, al-Qæda and sometimes al-Qa'ida) is a militant Sunni Islamist multi-national organization founded in 1988 by Osama bin Laden, Abdullah Azzam, and several other Arab volunteers during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan.Al-Qaeda operates as a network of Islamic extremists and Salafist jihadists. The organization has been designated as a terrorist group by the United Nations Security Council, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the European Union, the United States, the United Kingdom, Russia, India, and various other countries (see below). Al-Qaeda has mounted attacks on civilian and military targets in various countries, including the 1998 United States embassy bombings, the September 11 attacks, and the 2002 Bali bombings. The United States government responded to the September 11 attacks by launching the War on Terror, which sought to undermine Al-Qaeda and its allies. The deaths of key leaders, including that of Osama bin Laden, have lead al-Qaeda's operations to shift from the top down organization and planning of attacks, to the planning of attacks which are carried out by associated groups and lone-wolf operators. Al-Qaeda characteristically employs attacks which include suicide attacks and the simultaneous bombing of several targets. Activities which are ascribed to Al-Qaeda involve the actions of those who have made a pledge of loyalty to bin Laden, or to the actions of al-Qaeda-linked individuals who have undergone training in one of its camps in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq or Sudan. Al-Qaeda ideologues envision the removal of all foreign influences in Muslim countries, and the creation of a new caliphate ruling over the entire Muslim world.Among the beliefs ascribed to al-Qaeda members is the conviction that a Christian–Jewish alliance is conspiring to destroy Islam. As Salafist jihadists, members of al-Qaeda believe that the killing of non-combatants is religiously sanctioned. This belief ignores the aspects of religious scripture which forbid the murder of non-combatants and internecine fighting. Al-Qaeda also opposes what it regards as man-made laws, and wants to replace them with a strict form of sharia law.Al-Qaeda has carried out many attacks on targets which it considers kafir. Al-Qaeda is also responsible for instigating sectarian violence among Muslims. Al-Qaeda's leaders regard liberal Muslims, Shias, Sufis and other sects as heretical and its members and sympathizers have attacked their mosques and gatherings. Examples of sectarian attacks include the Yazidi community bombings, the Sadr City bombings, the Ashoura massacre and the April 2007 Baghdad bombings.Following the death of bin Laden in 2011, the group has been led by Egyptian Ayman al-Zawahiri.
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US releases bin Laden home videos

The US has released home videos of Osama bin Laden that were seized in the raid on his Pakistan compound last week.
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Osama Bin Laden spotted

Footage of what many believe to be Osama bin Laden in Pakistan
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'A letter from the monster': Osama bin Laden's declassified documents

'A letter from the monster': Osama bin Laden's declassified documents released by the Director of National Intelligence.
In the final years of his life, al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden tried to manage the terrorist network's operations and comment on world affairs, even as he grew more and more paranoid about spies and, in the end, worried about his own death.
A cache of 113 documents seized from bin Laden's Pakistani hideout have been translated and declassified by US intelligence agencies, and are now publicly available on the Office of the Director of National Intelligence's website: It's the second release of bin Laden material since Navy Seals killed the wanted terrorist in a raid on his compound in 2011.
Along with operational directives and personnel correspondence — including a handwritten will for bin Laden's $29 million fortune — the new documents also contain letters and essays on a wide range of issues, including the US financial crisis, the growing influence of Iran in the Middle East, and President Obama's political prospects.
Osama's letter to his wife:
I understand that you are in a psychological crisis. I am thinking of finding a way out for you
I ask God to speed up the resolution for you and to get us together on the shores of safety sooner and not later. I give you permission to return to your family and re-marry.
As for you, you are the apple of my eye, and the most precious thing that I have in this world. If you want to marry after me, I have no objection, but I really want for you to be my wife in paradise, and the woman, if she marries two men, is given a choice on Judgment Day to be with one of them.
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Clinton on Capitol Hill after trip to Afghanistan, Pakistan

(27 Oct 2011)
1. Wide, back view as U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton takes seat as hearing comes to order
2. Side Clinton at witness table
3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Hillary Rodham Clinton, U.S. Secretary of State:
Osama bin Laden and many of his top lieutenants are dead. The threat remains real and urgent, especially from al-Qaida's affiliates, but the group's senior leadership has been devastated and its ability to conduct operations greatly diminished. Many of our successes against Al Qaida would not have been possible without our presence in Afghanistan and close cooperation with Pakistan.
4. Side view Clinton at witness table
5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Hillary Rodham Clinton, U.S. Secretary of State:
Coalition and Afghan forces have increased pressure on the Taliban, the Haqqani network and other insurgents, including with a new operation in eastern Afghanistan launched in recent days. But our commanders on the ground are increasingly concerned, as they have been for some time that we have to go after the safe havens across the border in Pakistan. Now, I will be quick to add that the Pakistanis also have reason to be concerned about attacks coming at them from across the border in Afghanistan. So, in Islamabad last week, General (U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, Army General Martin) Dempsey, (CIA) Director (David) Petreaus and I delivered a single, unified message: Pakistan's civilian and military leadership must join us in squeezing the Haqqani network from both sides of the border and in closing safe havens. We underscored to our Pakistani counterparts the urgency of the task at hand and we had detailed and frank conversations about the concrete steps both sides need to take.
6. Wide, back view of hearing
7. Cutaway members of Congress
8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, Chairwoman, US House Committee on Foreign Affairs:
President Karzai said, 'God forbid if there ever is a war between Pakistan and America, then we will side with Pakistan.' I wanted to ask you is something he told you in your meetings? How do you interpret his comments?
9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Hillary Rodham Clinton, U.S. Secretary of State:
Frankly, when I heard about the comment we immediately asked (U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan) Ambassador (Ryan) Crocker to go in and figure out what it meant. You know, what the point of it was. And Ambassador Crocker is one of our most distinguished, experienced diplomats, and reported back that he really believed that what Karzai was talking about was the long history of cooperation between Afghanistan and Pakistan, in particular the refuge that Pakistan provided to millions of Afghans who were crossing the border seeking safety during the Soviet invasion, during the warlordism, during the Taliban period - and that it was not at all about a war that anybody was predicting. And that it was both taken out of context and misunderstood.
10. Wide, pan of hearing
STORYLINE:
Testifying on Capitol Hill after returning from a trip to Libya, Afghanistan and Pakistan, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton told lawmakers that the threat from terrorism in the region remains real and urgent.
Clinton told the House of Representatives Foreign Affairs Committee that during her talks with the leaders of both Afghanistan and Pakistan concerns had been raised again about the Taliban-linked Haqqani network.
(Our) commanders on the ground are increasingly concerned, as they have been for some time that we have to go after the safe havens across the border in Pakistan.
Now, I will be quick to add that the Pakistanis also have reason to be concerned about attacks coming at them from across the border in Afghanistan, she added.
About 3,000 of those have already left.


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Sohaib Athar

Sohaib Athar talks about citizen journalism and his Bin Laden tweet.
Interviewed at the Poynter Institute, Florida.

WH counterterrorism chief's briefing on raid on OBL compound

(2 May 2011)
1. Wide of White House press secretary Jay Carney and John Brennan, White House counter terrorism advisor, entering briefing room
2. Cutaway of reporters
3. SOUNDBITE (English) John Brennan, White House Counterterrorism Advisor:
The concern was that (Osama) bin Laden would oppose any type of capture operation. Indeed, he did. It was a firefight. He, therefore, was killed in that firefight. And that's when the remains (body) were removed. But we certainly were planning for the possibility, which we thought was going to be remote, given that he would likely resist arrest, that we would be able to capture him.
4. Cutaway of reporter asking question
5. SOUNDBITE (English) John Brennan, White House Counterterrorism Advisor:
She served as a shield. Again, this is my understanding and we're still getting the reports of exactly what happened at particular moments that when she fought back. When there was the opportunity to get to (Osama) bin Laden she was positioned in a way that indicated she was being used as a shield, whether or not bin Laden or the son or whatever put her there or she put herself there. But yes, that's again my understanding, that she met her demise, and my understanding is that she was one of bin Laden's wives.
6. Cutaway of Brennan at podium
7. SOUNDBITE (English) John Brennan, White House Counterterrorism Advisor:
The disposal of, the burial of bin Laden's remains was done in strict conformance with Islamic precepts and practices. It was prepared in accordance with the Islamic requirements. We, early on, made provisions for that type of burial and we wanted to make sure that it was going to be done, again, in strict conformance. So, it was taken care of in the appropriate way.
8. Cutaway - reporters and Brennan
9. SOUNDBITE (English) John Brennan, White House Counterterrorism Advisor:
This is a strategic blow to al-Qaida. It is a necessary, but not necessarily sufficient blow, to lead to its demise. But, we are determined to destroy it. I think we have a lot better opportunity now that bin Laden is out of there to destroy that organisation, create fractures within it. Number two, Zawahiri, (Ayman al-Zawahiri, widely regarded as bin Laden's deputy and successor) is not charismatic. He was not involved in the fight earlier on in Afghanistan and I think he has a lot of detractors within the organisation and I think you're going to see them start eating themselves from within more and more.
10. Wide of Brennan at podium in briefing room
STORYLINE
US President Barack Obama's top counterterrorism adviser, told reporters on Monday that the Navy Seals team which raided the hideout of al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden had contingency plans to take him alive but as expected a fire fight broke out and bin Laden was killed.
John Brennan said that first reports of the incident suggested that his wife died when she came between her husband and the US troops, but it wasn't clear if she placed herself in that position or if she was being used as a shield.
American forces killed bin Laden during a daring raid early on Monday at a walled compound in
northeast Pakistan, capping a search that spanned nearly a decade.
Bin Laden was shot in the head during a firefight and then quickly buried at sea, in accordance with Islamic precepts and belief.
Brennan said that the death of bin Laden was a strategic blow to the organisation and that he believes internal fighting in al Qaida may speed its demise.


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Pakistan terror network: ISI plans terror training camps in Bangladesh | NewsX Exclusive

Its a NewsX Exclusive- Intel agencies have raised an alert on Pakistan activities in Sunderbans. Pak's ISI is planning to train Mujahideen in Bangladesh. 20 cadres are being readied to infiltrate the West Bengal border. These Mujahideen are being given suicide attack training in dense forests. Training is being done ion 2 phases. Intel reports says that the second phase of training will last for 90 days. At least 85 Mujahideens will be trained in West Bengal.



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Yaron Lectures: The Morality of War

Although America has waged two wars, in Afghanistan and Iraq, in recent years, the threats to our security persist. We face many more years of continuing military strife in the Middle East and elsewhere. Our military is overwhelmingly powerful, but the moral guidance it receives from Washington is shockingly meek. What moral principles should guide a nation in war? In this lecture Yaron Brook explains and evaluates the dominant views on the morality of fighting a war. Questions to be addressed include: When is it morally proper and necessary to wage war? What should be the goal of a war? Under what conditions is it proper to strike preemptively? Is the military morally obliged to spare civilian lives? What treatment do prisoners of war deserve? Should war be fought for the sake of humanitarian ends? Under what conditions, if any, is it morally proper to use biological, chemical or nuclear weapons?

Recorded September 9, 2004.
This was first published on the Ayn Rand Institute Channel, for more see

Like what you hear? Become a Patreon member, get exclusive content and support the creation of more videos like this! or support the show direct through PayPal: paypal.me/YaronBrookShow.

Want more? Tune in to the Yaron Brook Show on YouTube ( Continue the discussions anywhere on-line after show time using #YaronBrookShow. Connect with Yaron via Tweet @YaronBrook or follow him on Facebook @ybrook and YouTube (/YaronBrook).

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Al-Qaeda | Wikipedia audio article

This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article:



00:03:12 1 Organization
00:05:46 1.1 Leadership
00:05:55 1.1.1 Osama bin Laden (1988 – May 2011)
00:06:37 1.1.2 After May 2011
00:09:00 1.2 Command structure
00:12:36 1.3 Field operatives
00:13:48 1.4 Insurgent forces
00:14:57 1.5 Financing
00:17:07 1.5.1 Allegations of Qatari support
00:22:03 2 Strategy
00:26:20 3 Name
00:28:42 4 Ideology
00:30:58 5 Religious compatibility
00:32:11 6 History
00:32:47 6.1 Jihad in Afghanistan
00:36:18 6.2 Expanding operations
00:38:27 6.3 Gulf War and the start of US enmity
00:39:48 6.4 Sudan
00:42:44 6.5 Refuge in Afghanistan
00:46:07 6.6 Call for global Salafi jihadism
00:47:12 6.7 Fatwas
00:48:58 6.8 Iraq
00:51:11 6.9 Somalia and Yemen
00:54:05 6.10 United States operations
00:57:29 6.11 Death of Osama bin Laden
00:59:48 6.12 Syria
01:02:10 6.13 India
01:03:47 7 Attacks
01:04:21 7.1 1992
01:05:41 7.2 Late 1990s
01:07:19 7.3 September 11 attacks
01:09:47 8 Designation as a terrorist group
01:10:05 9 War on Terror
01:13:45 10 Activities
01:13:54 10.1 Africa
01:15:54 10.2 Europe
01:18:23 10.3 Arab world
01:20:34 10.4 Kashmir
01:28:03 10.5 Internet
01:30:28 10.5.1 Online communications
01:30:53 10.6 Aviation network
01:31:56 10.7 Involvement in military conflicts
01:32:16 11 Alleged CIA involvement
01:36:03 12 Alleged Saudi and Emirati involvement
01:36:50 13 Alleged Pakistani involvement
01:37:11 14 Broader influence
01:37:39 15 Criticism
01:41:07 15.1 Other criticisms
01:42:57 16 See also



Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago.

Learning by listening is a great way to:
- increases imagination and understanding
- improves your listening skills
- improves your own spoken accent
- learn while on the move
- reduce eye strain

Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone.

Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio:

Other Wikipedia audio articles at:

Upload your own Wikipedia articles through:

Speaking Rate: 0.9431805585480915
Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-A


I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think.
- Socrates


SUMMARY
=======
Al-Qaeda (; Arabic: القاعدة‎ al-Qāʿidah, IPA: [ælqɑːʕɪdɐ], translation: The Base, The Foundation or The Database, alternatively spelled al-Qaida and al-Qa'ida) is a militant Sunni Islamist multi-national organization founded in 1988 by Osama bin Laden, Abdullah Azzam, and several other Arab volunteers during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan.Al-Qaeda operates as a network of Islamic extremists and Salafist jihadists. The organization has been designated as a terrorist group by the United Nations Security Council, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the European Union, the United States, the United Kingdom, Russia, India, and various other countries (see below). Al-Qaeda has mounted attacks on non-military and military targets in various countries, including the 1998 United States embassy bombings, the September 11 attacks, and the 2002 Bali bombings. The United States government responded to the September 11 attacks by launching the War on Terror, which sought to undermine al-Qaeda and its allies. The deaths of key leaders, including that of Osama bin Laden, have led al-Qaeda's operations to shift from the top down organization and planning of attacks, to the planning of attacks which are carried out by associated groups and lone-wolf operators. Al-Qaeda characteristically employs attacks which include suicide attacks and the simultaneous bombing of several targets. Activities which are ascribed to al-Qaeda involve the actions of those who have made a pledge of loyalty to bin Laden, or to the actions of al-Qaeda-linked individuals who have undergone training in one of its camps in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq or Sudan. Al-Qaeda ideologues envision the removal of all foreign influences in Muslim countries, and the creation of a new caliphate ruling over the entire Muslim world.Among the beliefs ascribed to al-Qaeda members is the conviction that a Christian–Jewish alliance is conspiring to destroy Islam. As Salafist jihadists, members of al-Qaeda believe that the killing of non-combatants is religiously sanctioned. This belief ignores the aspects of religious scripture which forbid the murder of non-combatants and internecine fighting. Al-Qaeda also opposes what it regards as man-made laws, and wants to replace them wit ...
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