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Politics

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Political Parties: Crash Course Government and Politics #40

Today, Craig is going to talk about political parties and their role in American politics. So, when most people think about political parties they associate them with the common ideologies of the voters and representatives within that party, but the goal of a party is NOT to influence policies. The role of political parties is much simpler: to win control of the government. So today, we’re going got talk about why we have political parties in the first place and then finish with the five functions they use in reaching that goal. It’s a lot to cover, so next week we’ll talk about what each political party stands for and how that has changed historically.

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Vocabulary: Talking about POLITICS in English

People all have different views when it comes to leadership and how to run a country. What about you? Are you liberal or conservative? Are you left-wing or right-wing? In this lesson, we will look at common vocabulary used to discuss politics. I will teach you words you need to know in order to understand the news, current events, and even have debates with your friends.
Next, watch Benjamin's lesson to learn even more political vocabulary:

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TRANSCRIPT

Hi. Welcome again to I'm Adam. Today, as in response to some requests, I'm going to give you a few vocabulary words or a few words-sorry-about political views. Now, before I start, I just want to make sure we understand: This is just about English. We're not having any political discussions, here. This is meant to help you read newspapers, watch TV broadcasts, listen to radio broadcasts about political news, and these are words that you will see quite often when you're reading these things or watching these programs. Okay? So, we're going to look at a few common words that come up when we're talking about political views. Now, political views are basically opinions about how politics should run, how governments should run or be run, etc.

So first we're going to look at the three main types of government. There are democracy, authoritarianism, and dictatorship. Democracy is a process by which several parties... Okay? Several parties, each one has its own leaders and its own members, and they compete for the votes of the public. You have several to choose from, the public chooses. The one that gets the most votes or wins somehow the election in their system, they lead the country for a specified period of time. And then you have another election, you can choose the government again, you can choose another government. You can do whatever you need to do.

Authoritarianism is a system by which only one party... Or in which I should say. Only one party controls the government. So, you don't really have any choice, and the elections are not... If there are elections, are not very legitimate. There's one party, they are the controlling power, they make the decisions, everybody does what they want them to do.

...ism. I'm just going to mention this. You're going to hear a lot of ism's when you're hearing about politics. Okay? It just means you're taking the concept of whatever the word is before it. So: ism is more about the concept of whatever.

Dictatorship, this is a form of government where one person controls the government and has all the power, all the decision-making power. We're not going to get into the details of how each of these types of government rules or runs the country they're in, but we're just going to talk about what they are very generally.

Next, so here we're getting more into the specific views that people have. Most people are Liberal or Conservative. Now, you're going to hear these words a lot. In America, for example, you hear about the Democrats and the Republicans. Generally, the Democrats are Liberal, the Republicans are Conservative. Liberal government or Liberal politicians believe in the individual. They want every individual to have an opportunity to succeed. They want, basically, to help everyone improve their lives somehow. Conservatives, on the other hand, they're more about everybody takes care of themselves. Sorry, Liberals, they want the government to help the individuals; Conservatives want the individuals to help themselves. And Conservatives comes from the word conserve, there would be an e here. They want to keep traditions, they want to keep or maintain values, they don't like change. Liberals, on the other hand, want to change all the time to meet the needs of the people. More good for more people, as it were.

Now, if you hear about left-wing or right-wing or centrist, you're talking about the spectrum. The spectrum is basically the range of political views. You have the far left-wing, you have the far right-wing, and you have the people in the centre; they're not really right, they're not really left. Although, they generally lean. Lean means rooop, I'm leaning to the right or I'm leaning to the left. So, even centrists, they're usually centre-right or centre-left, it means they're a little bit more to one side than the other, but generally, they're... They want a bit of a mix. Left-wing politicians or left-wing views generally go with Liberals. Right-wing views or right-wing politicians generally go the idea of Conservatives. Centrists want a little bit of a mix. They will go with whoever will do the best benefit for everybody.
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Political Ideology: Crash Course Government and Politics #35

So today Craig is going to look at political ideology in America. We're going to focus on liberals and conservatives and talk about the influencers of both of these viewpoints. Now, it's important to remember that political ideologies don't always perfectly correspond with political parties, and this correspondence becomes less and less likely over time. So, sure we can say that Democrats tend to be liberal and Republicans tend to be conservative, but we're not going to be talking about political parties in this episode. It's also important to note, that there are going to be a lot of generalizations here, as most peoples' ideologies fall on a spectrum, but we're going to try our best *crosses fingers* to summarize the most commonly held viewpoints for each of these positions as they are used pretty frequently in discussions of American politics.

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Politics: Crash Course Sociology #30

While politics is generally seen as the domain of a civics class (and Craig did a great job of teaching US Government & Politics elsewhere on this channel!) it’s something that sociology is interested in too. Today we’re looking at the sociological approach to politics, different types of authority and political systems, and different sociological theories of power.

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CC Sociology course textbook: Sociology by John J. Macionis, 15th edition (2014)

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Political Campaigns: Crash Course Government and Politics #39

So political campaigns are a pretty big deal in the United States. For instance the 2012 presidential election clocked in at the most expensive ever - at around $6 billion dollars! Needless to say, money plays a very big role in American elections. So today, Craig is going to take a look at why we have campaigns in the first place, why the campaign seasons run for so long, and of course why campaigns cost so much.

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Learn about the UK political system & elections

In this lesson I will explain a little about how the UK political system works, and introduce you to some of the vocabulary. You'll learn about the major parties, local councils, constituencies, and more. So, welcome to the unpredictable world of UK politics! This is a great lesson to help you understand the news, even if you don't live in the UK. Listening to British news is a great way to practise your English, and understanding what they are talking about will really help! When I made this video in early 2017, I thought that the next UK General Election would not happen until 2020 -- how wrong I was! So here is the video, just a few days ahead of a surprise General Election in June 2017.
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Media Institution: Crash Course Government and Politics #44

So today we're going to look at the rather thorny issue of the media and its role in politics. Wether you're talking about older forms of media like newspapers and radio or newer forms like television and the Internet, all media serves the same purpose - to provide information to the public. So we're going to discuss their strengths and weaknesses and examine how both content creators and consumers play a role in the information that is told. It could be argued that because the media only relays information it isn't actually important to the American political system, but when you look more closely at what and how this information affects voters as well as their elected officials, we can more clearly see its importance as a political institution.

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Election Basics: Crash Course Government and Politics #36

This week Craig is going to give you a broad overview of elections in the United States. So as you may have noticed, there are kind of a lot of people in the U.S, and holding individual issues up to a public vote doesn't seem particularly plausible. So to deal with this complexity, we vote for people, not policies, that represent our best interests. But as you'll see, this process was not thoroughly addressed in the Constitution, so there have been a number of amendments and laws at the state level implemented to create the election system we all know and (maybe) love today.

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Interest Groups: Crash Course Government and Politics #42

Today, Craig is going to talk about something you fans out there have been demanding for months - money in politics. Specifically, we're going to talk about special interest groups and their role in the U.S. political system. Special interest groups are groups of individuals that make policy-related appeals to government - like the NRA, AARP, or the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. It's all pretty controversial, as money plays an important role in the policies and people these groups influence, so we'll bring in the clones to argue for and against them.

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How To Do Politics

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The way you talk about politics may be perfectly justified, but does it help or hurt your cause?

*The end of this video includes a paid sponsored promotion. This company had no part in the writing, editing, or production of the rest of the video.

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Party Systems: Crash Course Government and Politics #41

Today, Craig is going to dive into the history of American political parties. So throughout most of United States history our political system has been dominated by a two-party system, but the policies and the groups that support these parties have changed drastically throughout history. There have been five, arguably six, party systems since the election of John Adams in 1796 (George Washington’s presidency was an unusual case, and we’ll get to that), so we’ll look at the supporters and policies of each of the parties during these eras and look at how historical contingencies cause these policy shifts. We’ll also talk a bit about the benefit of a third party, which although rarely ever wins, helps to influence political debate.

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Introduction: Crash Course U.S. Government and Politics

In which Craig Benzine introduces a brand new Crash Course about U.S. Government and Politics! This course will provide you with an overview of how the government of the United States is supposed to function, and we'll get into how it actually does function. The two aren't always the same thing. We'll be learning about the branches of government, politics, elections, political parties, pizza parties, and much, much more!

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Bureaucracy Basics: Crash Course Government and Politics #15

This week Craig Benzine discuses bureaucracies. Bureaucracies tend to be associated with unintelligible rules and time-wasting procedures, but they play an important, though controversial, role in governing. From the FDA to the EPA, these agencies were established to help the government manage and carry out laws much more efficiently - to bring the rule making and enforcement closer to the experts. But the federal bureaucracy (which is part of the executive branch) has a lot of power and sometimes acts likes Congress in creating regulations and like the courts through administrative adjudications. It's all a bit problematic for that whole separation of powers thing. So we'll talk about that too, and the arguments for and against increased federal bureaucracy.

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Lecture 1: Introduction to Power and Politics in Today’s World

Professor Ian Shapiro introduces the class “Power and Politics in Today’s World.”
This course provides an examination of political dynamics and institutions over this past tumultuous quarter century, and the implications of these changes for what comes next. Among the topics covered are the decline of trade unions and enlarged role of business as political forces, changing attitudes towards parties and other political institutions amidst the growth of inequality and middle-class insecurity, the emergence of new forms of authoritarianism, and the character and durability of the unipolar international order that replaced the Cold War.

Points, Actions, and Marginal Votes - The Game of Elections - Extra Politics - #1

Extra Politics is an 8-episode mini-series exploring the United States political system from a game design perspective. Today we're discussing why candidates spend their action points during the election cycle in bizarre but interesting ways.

Extra Politics is created by guest writer Luke Peterschmidt (@LPeterschmidt), guest artist Joe Maslov (@super_jogurt), and narrator Daniel Floyd (@DanFloydPlus).

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Public Opinion: Crash Course Government and Politics #33

So today, Craig is finally going to start talking about politics. Now up until this point we've specifically been looking at government - that is answering the questions of who, what, and how in relation to policies. But politics is different in that it looks at why certain policies are made. We're going to start today by looking at public opinion - specifically how the public does (and does not) influence our elected officials.


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1. Introduction: What is Political Philosophy?

Introduction to Political Philosophy (PLSC 114)

Professor Smith discusses the nature and scope of political philosophy. The oldest of the social sciences, the study of political philosophy must begin with the works of Plato and Aristotle, and examine in depth the fundamental concepts and categories of the study of politics. The questions which regimes are best? and what constitutes good citizenship? are posed and discussed in the context of Plato's Apology.

00:00 - Chapter 1. What Is Political Philosophy?
12:16 - Chapter 2. What Is a Regime?
22:19 - Chapter 3. Who Is a Statesman? What Is a Statesman?
27:22 - Chapter 4. What Is the Best Regime?

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2006.

Language of Politics - Noam Chomsky

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MIT Prof. Noam Chomsky on two meanings of political terms, primary principle of international relations, and role of propaganda

What if we replaced politicians with randomly selected people? | Brett Hennig

If you think democracy is broken, here's an idea: let's replace politicians with randomly selected people. Author and activist Brett Hennig presents a compelling case for sortition democracy, or random selection of government officials -- a system with roots in ancient Athens that taps into the wisdom of the crowd and entrusts ordinary people with making balanced decisions for the greater good of everyone. Sound crazy? Learn more about how it could work to create a world free of partisan politics.

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Why Major in Political Science?

Undecided about your college major? Why major in political science? What is political science? This filmed lecture was part of a 'Pizza and Politics' series lecture held at Duke University. To learn more about political science as a college major, visit the American Political Science Associate section dedicated to careers in the field -

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Produced by Shaun King, Duke University Department of Political Science Multimedia Specialist

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