This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

Politics

x

Political Parties: Crash Course Government and Politics #40

Today, Craig is going to talk about political parties and their role in American politics. So, when most people think about political parties they associate them with the common ideologies of the voters and representatives within that party, but the goal of a party is NOT to influence policies. The role of political parties is much simpler: to win control of the government. So today, we’re going got talk about why we have political parties in the first place and then finish with the five functions they use in reaching that goal. It’s a lot to cover, so next week we’ll talk about what each political party stands for and how that has changed historically.

Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios:

Support is provided by Voqal:

All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0


Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook -
Twitter -
Tumblr -
Support Crash Course on Patreon:

CC Kids:

Vocabulary: Talking about POLITICS in English

People all have different views when it comes to leadership and how to run a country. What about you? Are you liberal or conservative? Are you left-wing or right-wing? In this lesson, we will look at common vocabulary used to discuss politics. I will teach you words you need to know in order to understand the news, current events, and even have debates with your friends.
Next, watch Benjamin's lesson to learn even more political vocabulary:

TAKE THE QUIZ:

TRANSCRIPT

Hi. Welcome again to I'm Adam. Today, as in response to some requests, I'm going to give you a few vocabulary words or a few words-sorry-about political views. Now, before I start, I just want to make sure we understand: This is just about English. We're not having any political discussions, here. This is meant to help you read newspapers, watch TV broadcasts, listen to radio broadcasts about political news, and these are words that you will see quite often when you're reading these things or watching these programs. Okay? So, we're going to look at a few common words that come up when we're talking about political views. Now, political views are basically opinions about how politics should run, how governments should run or be run, etc.

So first we're going to look at the three main types of government. There are democracy, authoritarianism, and dictatorship. Democracy is a process by which several parties... Okay? Several parties, each one has its own leaders and its own members, and they compete for the votes of the public. You have several to choose from, the public chooses. The one that gets the most votes or wins somehow the election in their system, they lead the country for a specified period of time. And then you have another election, you can choose the government again, you can choose another government. You can do whatever you need to do.

Authoritarianism is a system by which only one party... Or in which I should say. Only one party controls the government. So, you don't really have any choice, and the elections are not... If there are elections, are not very legitimate. There's one party, they are the controlling power, they make the decisions, everybody does what they want them to do.

...ism. I'm just going to mention this. You're going to hear a lot of ism's when you're hearing about politics. Okay? It just means you're taking the concept of whatever the word is before it. So: ism is more about the concept of whatever.

Dictatorship, this is a form of government where one person controls the government and has all the power, all the decision-making power. We're not going to get into the details of how each of these types of government rules or runs the country they're in, but we're just going to talk about what they are very generally.

Next, so here we're getting more into the specific views that people have. Most people are Liberal or Conservative. Now, you're going to hear these words a lot. In America, for example, you hear about the Democrats and the Republicans. Generally, the Democrats are Liberal, the Republicans are Conservative. Liberal government or Liberal politicians believe in the individual. They want every individual to have an opportunity to succeed. They want, basically, to help everyone improve their lives somehow. Conservatives, on the other hand, they're more about everybody takes care of themselves. Sorry, Liberals, they want the government to help the individuals; Conservatives want the individuals to help themselves. And Conservatives comes from the word conserve, there would be an e here. They want to keep traditions, they want to keep or maintain values, they don't like change. Liberals, on the other hand, want to change all the time to meet the needs of the people. More good for more people, as it were.

Now, if you hear about left-wing or right-wing or centrist, you're talking about the spectrum. The spectrum is basically the range of political views. You have the far left-wing, you have the far right-wing, and you have the people in the centre; they're not really right, they're not really left. Although, they generally lean. Lean means rooop, I'm leaning to the right or I'm leaning to the left. So, even centrists, they're usually centre-right or centre-left, it means they're a little bit more to one side than the other, but generally, they're... They want a bit of a mix. Left-wing politicians or left-wing views generally go with Liberals. Right-wing views or right-wing politicians generally go the idea of Conservatives. Centrists want a little bit of a mix. They will go with whoever will do the best benefit for everybody.
x

Political Ideology: Crash Course Government and Politics #35

So today Craig is going to look at political ideology in America. We're going to focus on liberals and conservatives and talk about the influencers of both of these viewpoints. Now, it's important to remember that political ideologies don't always perfectly correspond with political parties, and this correspondence becomes less and less likely over time. So, sure we can say that Democrats tend to be liberal and Republicans tend to be conservative, but we're not going to be talking about political parties in this episode. It's also important to note, that there are going to be a lot of generalizations here, as most peoples' ideologies fall on a spectrum, but we're going to try our best *crosses fingers* to summarize the most commonly held viewpoints for each of these positions as they are used pretty frequently in discussions of American politics.

Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios:

Support is provided by Voqal:

All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0


Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook -
Twitter -
Tumblr -
Support Crash Course on Patreon:

CC Kids:

Political Campaigns: Crash Course Government and Politics #39

So political campaigns are a pretty big deal in the United States. For instance the 2012 presidential election clocked in at the most expensive ever - at around $6 billion dollars! Needless to say, money plays a very big role in American elections. So today, Craig is going to take a look at why we have campaigns in the first place, why the campaign seasons run for so long, and of course why campaigns cost so much.

Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios:

Support is provided by Voqal:

All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0



Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook -
Twitter -
Tumblr -
Support Crash Course on Patreon:

CC Kids:
x

Election Basics: Crash Course Government and Politics #36

This week Craig is going to give you a broad overview of elections in the United States. So as you may have noticed, there are kind of a lot of people in the U.S, and holding individual issues up to a public vote doesn't seem particularly plausible. So to deal with this complexity, we vote for people, not policies, that represent our best interests. But as you'll see, this process was not thoroughly addressed in the Constitution, so there have been a number of amendments and laws at the state level implemented to create the election system we all know and (maybe) love today.

Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios:

Support is provided by Voqal:

All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0


Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook -
Twitter -
Tumblr -
Support Crash Course on Patreon:
CC Kids:

Learn all about the British political system & elections

In this lesson I will explain a little about how the UK political system works, and introduce you to some of the vocabulary. You'll learn about the major parties, local councils, constituencies, and more. So, welcome to the unpredictable world of UK politics! This is a great lesson to help you understand the news, even if you don't live in the UK. Listening to British news is a great way to practise your English, and understanding what they are talking about will really help! When I made this video in early 2017, I thought that the next UK General Election would not happen until 2020 -- how wrong I was! So here is the video, just a few days ahead of a surprise General Election in June 2017.
x

Youth Adda: How Does Student Politics Work? | Elections 2019

Equal opportunity or oppression? Listen to what the youth of India has to say about student politics. InUth and Yuvaa present the most extensive youth poll that captures the young Indians' outlook on Elections 2019 - Youth Adda.
#Elections2019 #LokSabhaElections2019 #YouthAdda #IndianExpress #IndianYouth #IndianPolitics #YouthOfIndia #WeTheStories

Watch More Videos By InUth:
🡆 Youth Adda: Why Young India Doesn't Want To Vote? | Elections 2019:
🡆 Youth Adda: What Qualities Should India's Prime Minister Have? | Elections 2019:
🡆 Youth Adda: Why Should India Vote? | Elections 2019:

Subscribe to Indian Express:

The Indian Express Online covers all latest and trending news across India, which includes political news, mobile launches, gadgets reviews, technology updates, Entertainment News, Bollywood news, public opinions and views on daily trends.

Connect with us:
Facebook:
Twitter:
Indian Express App:
Official Website:
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Subscribe to our other Network Channels:

Financial Express for Business News:
Jansatta for Hindi News:
Loksatta Live for Marathi News:
Inuth for Trending News:
Express Drive for Automobile News:
IeMalayalam for Malayalam News:

Interest Groups: Crash Course Government and Politics #42

Today, Craig is going to talk about something you fans out there have been demanding for months - money in politics. Specifically, we're going to talk about special interest groups and their role in the U.S. political system. Special interest groups are groups of individuals that make policy-related appeals to government - like the NRA, AARP, or the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. It's all pretty controversial, as money plays an important role in the policies and people these groups influence, so we'll bring in the clones to argue for and against them.

Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios:

Support is provided by Voqal:

All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0



Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook -
Twitter -
Tumblr -
Support Crash Course on Patreon:
CC Kids:

Party Systems: Crash Course Government and Politics #41

Today, Craig is going to dive into the history of American political parties. So throughout most of United States history our political system has been dominated by a two-party system, but the policies and the groups that support these parties have changed drastically throughout history. There have been five, arguably six, party systems since the election of John Adams in 1796 (George Washington’s presidency was an unusual case, and we’ll get to that), so we’ll look at the supporters and policies of each of the parties during these eras and look at how historical contingencies cause these policy shifts. We’ll also talk a bit about the benefit of a third party, which although rarely ever wins, helps to influence political debate.

Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios:

Support is provided by Voqal:

All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0


Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook -
Twitter -
Tumblr -
Support Crash Course on Patreon:

CC Kids:

Shares

x

Check Also

x

Menu