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Sarjo Koita - talks about his education

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Sarjo Koita - talks about his education

Focusing on African migrants in Scotland’s largest city, ‘Glasgow’s African Tales’ explores memories and stories of African cultural traditions and the ways in which migrants sometimes struggled to keep those traditions alive in a new land.

Sarjo Koita - talks about his parent's polygamous marriage

Focusing on African migrants in Scotland’s largest city, ‘Glasgow’s African Tales’ explores memories and stories of African cultural traditions and the ways in which migrants sometimes struggled to keep those traditions alive in a new land.
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Sarjo Koita - leadership, governance and hierarchy

Focusing on African migrants in Scotland’s largest city, ‘Glasgow’s African Tales’ explores memories and stories of African cultural traditions and the ways in which migrants sometimes struggled to keep those traditions alive in a new land.

Sarjo Koita - talks about female circumcision (FGM)

Focusing on African migrants in Scotland’s largest city, ‘Glasgow’s African Tales’ explores memories and stories of African cultural traditions and the ways in which migrants sometimes struggled to keep those traditions alive in a new land.
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Sarjo Koita - old age

Focusing on African migrants in Scotland’s largest city, ‘Glasgow’s African Tales’ explores memories and stories of African cultural traditions and the ways in which migrants sometimes struggled to keep those traditions alive in a new land.

Sarjo Koita - courtship

Focusing on African migrants in Scotland’s largest city, ‘Glasgow’s African Tales’ explores memories and stories of African cultural traditions and the ways in which migrants sometimes struggled to keep those traditions alive in a new land.
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Sarjo Koita - community support

Focusing on African migrants in Scotland’s largest city, ‘Glasgow’s African Tales’ explores memories and stories of African cultural traditions and the ways in which migrants sometimes struggled to keep those traditions alive in a new land.

Sarjo Koita - Gambian community

Focusing on African migrants in Scotland’s largest city, ‘Glasgow’s African Tales’ explores memories and stories of African cultural traditions and the ways in which migrants sometimes struggled to keep those traditions alive in a new land.

Sarjo Koita - our children are our retirement

Focusing on African migrants in Scotland’s largest city, ‘Glasgow’s African Tales’ explores memories and stories of African cultural traditions and the ways in which migrants sometimes struggled to keep those traditions alive in a new land.

Sarjo Koita - African naming ceremony in Scotland

Focusing on African migrants in Scotland’s largest city, ‘Glasgow’s African Tales’ explores memories and stories of African cultural traditions and the ways in which migrants sometimes struggled to keep those traditions alive in a new land.
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Sarjo Koita - African community in Scotland

Focusing on African migrants in Scotland’s largest city, ‘Glasgow’s African Tales’ explores memories and stories of African cultural traditions and the ways in which migrants sometimes struggled to keep those traditions alive in a new land.

Sarjo Koita - weddings

Focusing on African migrants in Scotland’s largest city, ‘Glasgow’s African Tales’ explores memories and stories of African cultural traditions and the ways in which migrants sometimes struggled to keep those traditions alive in a new land.
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Sarjo Koita - male rites of passage to manhood

Focusing on African migrants in Scotland’s largest city, ‘Glasgow’s African Tales’ explores memories and stories of African cultural traditions and the ways in which migrants sometimes struggled to keep those traditions alive in a new land.

Sarjo Koita - discusses funerals of Gambians

Focusing on African migrants in Scotland’s largest city, ‘Glasgow’s African Tales’ explores memories and stories of African cultural traditions and the ways in which migrants sometimes struggled to keep those traditions alive in a new land.

Sarjo Koita - wearing African clothes to naming ceremony in Scotland

Focusing on African migrants in Scotland’s largest city, ‘Glasgow’s African Tales’ explores memories and stories of African cultural traditions and the ways in which migrants sometimes struggled to keep those traditions alive in a new land.
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6 July 2017

Moussa_Molo_ABS2015

Moussa Molo en concert au festival de Barsac 2015

Mali Empire | Wikipedia audio article

This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article:
Mali Empire

Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago.

Learning by listening is a great way to:
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Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone.

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The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.
- Socrates



SUMMARY
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The Mali Empire (Manding: Nyeni or Niani; also historically referred to as the Manden Kurufaba, sometimes shortened to Manden) was an empire in West Africa from c. 1230 to 1670. The empire was founded by Sundiata Keita and became renowned for the wealth of its rulers, especially Musa Keita. The Manding languages were spoken in the empire. It was the largest empire in West Africa and profoundly influenced the culture of West Africa through the spread of its language, laws and customs. Much of the recorded information about the Mali Empire comes from 14th-century North African Arab historian Ibn Khaldun, 14th-century Moroccan traveller Ibn Battuta and 16th-century Moroccan traveller Leo Africanus. The other major source of information is Mandinka oral tradition, through storytellers known as griots.The empire began as a small Mandinka kingdom at the upper reaches of the Niger River, centred around the town of Niani (the empire's namesake in Manding). During the 11th and 12th centuries, it began to develop as an empire following the decline of the Ghana Empire to the north. During this period, trade routes shifted southward to the savanna, stimulating the growth of states. The early history of the Mali Empire (before the 13th century) is unclear, as there are conflicting and imprecise accounts by both Arab chroniclers and oral traditionalists. Sundiata Keita (c. 1214–c. 1255) is the first ruler for which there is accurate written information (through Ibn Khaldun). Sundiata Keita was a warrior-prince of the Keita dynasty who was called upon to free the Mali people from the rule of the king of the Sosso Empire, Soumaoro Kanté. The conquest of Sosso in c. 1235 gave the Mali Empire access to the trans-Saharan trade routes.
Following the death of Sundiata Keita in c. 1255, the kings of Mali were referred to by the title mansa. Sundiata's nephew Mansa Musa made a Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca during the reign of the Mamluk Sultan Baibars (r. 1260–1277). Following a series of usurpations of the throne of Mali, in c. 1285 Sakoura, a former royal court slave, became emperor and was one of its most powerful rulers, greatly expanding the territories of Mali. He made a pilgrimage to Mecca during the reign of Mamluk Sultan An-Nasir Muhammad (r. 1298–1308). Dying on his return, the throne reverted to the descendants of Sundiata Keita. After the reigns of three more emperors, Musa Keita became emperor in c. 1312. Musa made a famous pilgrimage to Mecca from 1324 to 1326. His generous gifts to Mamluk Egypt and his expenditure of gold caused gold to be greatly devalued, which gave rise to his fame outside of Mali. In 1337, he was succeeded by his son Maghan I, who in 1341 was deposed by his uncle Suleyman. It was during Suleyman's reign that Ibn Battuta visited Mali. Following this period, a period of weak emperors, conflicts and disunity began in Mali.
Ibn Khaldun died in 1406, and following his death there was no continuous record of events in the Mali Empire. It is known from the Tarikh al-Sudan that Mali was still a sizeable state in the 15th century. The Venetian explorer Alvise Cadamosto and Portuguese traders confirmed that the peoples of the Gambia were still subject to the mansa of Mali. Upon Leo Africanus's visit at the beginning of the 16th century, his descriptions of the territorial domains of Mali showed that it was still a kingdom of considerable area. However, from 1507 neighbouring states such as Diara, Great Fulo and the Songhay Empire were eroding the extreme territories of Mali. In 1542, the Songhay invaded the capital city of Niani but were unsuccessful in conquering the empire. During the 17th century, the Mali empire faced incursions from the Bamana Empire. After unsuccessful attempts by Mansa Mama Maghan to conquer Bamana, in 1670 Bamana sacked and burned Niani, and the Mali Empire rapidly disintegrated and ceased to exist, being replaced by independent chiefdoms. ...

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