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Should patents on COVID-19 vaccines be suspended?

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Should patents on COVID-19 vaccines be suspended?

Doctors Without Borders is urging rich countries to take steps to allow more coronavirus vaccines to be produced around the world, including in developing nations, without fear of reprisal. Intellectual property rights prevent countries from making domestic versions of vaccines. Hundreds of Nobel laureates and 75 former world leaders have already signed a letter to U.S. President Joe Biden calling on him to suspend patents during the pandemic.

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US joins support for a waiver on COVID vaccine patents | DW News

The US will support a proposal to waive IP protections for coronavirus vaccines, Washington's top trade official said. More than 100 countries want the temporary suspension of patents on COVID-19 vaccines.

Many countries want the lifting of patents, copyrights, and protections for industrial design and confidential information related to COVID-19 vaccines. They are calling for suspension of such protections for several years to help speed up vaccine production. The idea of waiving intellectual property rights for COVID-19 vaccines has wide support among the developing world, as countries struggle to secure enough doses to inoculate their citizens. Meanwhile rich nations such as the US have been accused of hoarding vaccine supplies.

Both international and domestic US leaders praised the move by Biden. WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus called the Biden administration's decision to support the waiver proposal a monumental moment in the fight against COVID-19. Ghebreyesus backs the initiative, saying that such waivers are within the powers of the WTO and that it is the perfect time to use them.

The proposal has faced stiff opposition from countries with powerful pharmaceutical and biotech industries. They say that such a waiver would not provide the relief that people hope, as vaccine production is a complex procedure that cannot be ramped up simply by lifting protections, which could have an impact on future innovation.


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WTO debates suspending coronavirus vaccine patents

A number of developing nations are calling on the World Trade Organization to suspend patents for coronavirus vaccines so that they can be produced more quickly. 

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Canada not yet waiving COVID-19 vaccine patents

Some countries, including the U.S., argue vaccine patents should be waived during the pandemic to speed up vaccine supply for the world, but Canada is not actively supporting that idea.
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Can a patent waiver speed up the global COVID vaccination drive? | DW News

The world is far from having the number of COVID-19 vaccines needed to vaccinate every single person. Now, over 100 nations are pressing for a temporary patent waiver at the World Trade Organization to help speed up production. Some have suggested pharmaceutical companies are prioritizing profits over lives. Supporters of the waiver demand that know-how and technology be shared more widely - because the pandemic, they say, is an extraordinary, emergency situation. But a string of wealthy countries are opposing the waiver. And some say even if one was put in place, it would not increase vaccine production.

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Coronavirus: US supports lifting Covid-19 vaccine patents - BBC Newsnight

The US announces it supports waiving intellectual property protection for Covid vaccines to help end the pandemic. What difference could this make? Please subscribe HERE

The US has said it will support a proposal to waive intellectual-property protections for Covid-19 vaccines - joining an effort to increase global supply to narrow the gap between rich and poor nations.

The statement now needs to be followed up with a concrete plan for what this means and how it happens. But it is likely to put pressure on other nations, like the UK, to follow suit.

The IP waiver has been opposed by drugmakers, who say the plan is ineffective.

Pharmaceutical companies argue that few countries have the capacity to produce more vaccines even if they knew the formulas, and that there is still a limited global supply of materials needed.

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Biden administration supports waiver of patent protections for Covid vaccines

The White House announced it supports waiver of patent protections for Covid-19 vaccines, Ylan Mui reports. She joins 'Closing Bell' to discuss. For access to live and exclusive video from CNBC subscribe to CNBC PRO:

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Will rich countries lift their waivers on patents for Covid-19 vaccines? | Inside Story

Poor nations are stepping up their fight for equal access to covid-19 vaccines.
They're trying to convince rich nations to support their request for a waiver on patent rights.
They say acquiring vaccine knowledge could help them boost production of jabs.
President Joe Biden must now decide whether to change course and support the move.
The U.S. is one of several nations resisting the request at the world trade body, arguing it would discourage innovation.
Separately, the country's about to get control of a patent - basically making it the owner of the technology at the heart of several vaccines.
Those drugs are built on this technology... so other producers will have to get licences from the U.S. to use it, once the patent is issued.
But will the U.S. use the opporunity to pressure drugmakers for more equal access?

Presenter: Kim Vinell

Guests
Thomas Pogge, Professor of Philosophy and Political Science at Yale University and Co-founder of Incentives for Global Health.
Samantha Vanderslott, Researcher at the Oxford Vaccine Group.
Max Lawson, Head of Inequality Policy at Oxfam International.

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#InsideStory #Vaccines #COVID-19 #Vaccination #Vaccine

Waiving vaccine patent rights may be the 'only way' to end the pandemic

President Biden announced that the U.S. will support waiving patent rights for the COVID vaccines — a major move that follows a call domestically, and internationally, for America to provide much quicker and greater assistance to the rest of the world. William Brangham looks at the potential impact of this decision and the reaction to it with Madhavi Sunder of the Georgetown University Law Center.

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Global effort underway to ramp up COVID-19 vaccine production

In an international effort to ramp up the COVID-19 vaccine production, the U.S. government is supporting a proposal to suspend patent rules.

In Canada, there are growing calls for the government to support lifting patents for COVID-19 vaccines and other coronavirus-related medical products that could potentially boost global access to supplies amid the pandemic.

In an open letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau April 24, more than 900 medical students and health advocates across the country urged the Canadian government to sign a proposal for an intellectual property (IP) waiver to enable patent-free, widespread manufacturing of COVID-19 medicines and vaccines.

Jackson Proskow explains what that means for developing nations and Canada.

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How Suspending COVID-19 Vaccine Patents Could Improve Access

India is experiencing a major COVID-19 outbreak but has fully vaccinated only 2% of its population against the virus. By comparison, 32% of the population in the U.S. has been inoculated against COVID-19. We discuss how suspending vaccine patents could make doses more accessible.

Covid vaccines: Should global political leaders abandon patent protections? - BBC Newsnight

Newsnight has learned countries in the World Health Organization (WHO) have agreed they need to consider sidestepping patents to help with global vaccine supplies. Please subscribe HERE

As WHO officials warn the world is on the brink of a catastrophic moral failure because of unequal Covid vaccine policies, pressure is growing on pharmaceutical companies to be forced to waive the patent protections on their vaccines.
 
India and South Africa are part of a group of countries who have been arguing they need to be able to make their own vaccines without getting a license first.
 
Newsnight has seen a document revealing that for the first time countries in the World Health Organisation have agreed they need to consider moving on patents to help with global vaccine supplies.
 
Should global political leaders abandon patent protections?
 
Newsnight’s Health Correspondent Deb Cohen reports. Emma Barnett is joined by former President of Ireland and UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, now chair of The Elders, Mary Robinson and Director-General of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers & Associations, Thomas Cueni.

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Biden backs waiving COVID-19 vaccine patents

President Biden is siding with other world leaders to waive patents on coronavirus vaccines, a move that could help countries struggling with new waves of the virus. CBS News chief White House correspondent Nancy Cordes joined CBSN to discuss what comes next, and other news from the Biden administration.

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US Backing 'Vaccine Patent Rights Waiver' Is Good, But Will It Help India Ramp Up Vaccination?

The US President Joe Biden has extended support for a global waiver on patent protections for Covid-19 vaccines. The waiver would allow developing countries like India and South Africa to accelerate their own vaccine production.

US Trade Representative Katherine Tai said, “extraordinary circumstances of the Covid-19 pandemic call for extraordinary measures”. The head of the World Health Organization, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus has welcomed the decision.

#USVaccineWaiver #Covid19India #WTO #JoeBiden #USCovid19 #PfizerVacine

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Dr. Scott Gottlieb on the global fight over Covid vaccine intellectual property

The U.S., Canada and U.K. are among some of the high-income countries actively blocking a patent-waiver proposal designed to boost the global production of Covid-19 vaccines. Dr. Scott Gottlieb, member of the boards of Pfizer and biotech company Illumina and former FDA commissioner, joined Squawk Box on Wednesday to discuss the global fight around vaccine intellectual property rights. For access to live and exclusive video from CNBC subscribe to CNBC PRO:

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How patent waivers could remove barriers to worldwide vaccines

Countries around the world are praising U.S. President Joe Biden's recent support to waive intellectual property rights, allowing more nations to produce COVID-19 vaccines. James Krellenstein, co-founder of PrEP4All, a think-tank working to ensure COVID treatments are made universally accessible, says this was a step in the right direction.

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Vaccine waiver a 'political move,' won't increase supply or access, analyst says

Andrew Baum, global head of the health care sector at Citi, discusses proposals to waive patents on Covid-19 vaccines.

US backs plan to waive Covid-19 vaccine patents, EU ready to discuss

European Union leaders said Thursday that in the wake of the #US backing for waiving patents on #Covid-19 #vaccine technology the 27-nation bloc will start discussing such plans immediately. Their first get-together to mold a common view will come as as soon as during their two-day summit in Porto, Portugal, starting Friday.

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Should the COVID-19 vaccine be patent-free?

The race is on for what some argue will be the most coveted resource of our time: a COVID-19 vaccine.

It’s not just about the health of people, but getting economies going again. And geopolitics is shaping the decisions around who will get the vaccine first.

Canada is among many rich nations that have taken a gamble on pharmaceutical companies and have pre-ordered millions of vaccines -- in the hopes that one will be successful.

But some in the international community worry it leaves developing countries in the dark and have advocated for any successful vaccine to be patent-free. But how would that work and would it be realistic?

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Patent law and a COVID-19 vaccine

Senior lecturer Dr Dilan Thampapillai previews his essay, The controversy to come? Patent law and a COVID-19 vaccine, for the ANU College of Law essay series International law and COVID-19.

Read his essay here:

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