This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

Sleeping sickness by trypanosoma

x

African Sleeping Sickness (Trypanosomiasis) | Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Lesson on African Trypanosomiasis (African Sleeping Sickness): Causes, Symptoms and Treatment. African Trypanosomiasis is caused by parasitic protozoa from the genus trypanosoma. Trypanosoma protozoa are carried in the tsetse fly, and when a person is bitten by a tsetse fly, trypomastigotes enter the bloodstream of the infected individual. Trypomastigotes also enter lymphatic system and spinal fluid, where they multiply by binary fission. Systems affected in African Trypanosomiasis include the skin, lymphatic system and central nervous system.

If you found this video helpful, please like and subscribe for more videos like this one :)

JJ

*Subscribe for more free medical lessons*

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
For books and more information on these topics


Support future lessons (and get other cool stuff) ➜

Follow me on Twitter! ➜

Come join me on Facebook! ➜

Start your own website with BlueHost ➜

Check out the best tool to help grow your YouTube channel (it’s helped me!)


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Check out some of my other lessons.

Medical Terminology - The Basics - Lesson 1:


Fatty Acid Synthesis Pathway:


Wnt/B Catenin Signaling Pathway:


Upper vs. Lower Motor Neuron Lesions:


Lesson on the Purine Synthesis and Salvage Pathway:


Gastrulation | Formation of Germ Layers:


Introductory lesson on Autophagy (Macroautophagy):


Infectious Disease Playlist


Dermatology Playlist


Pharmacology Playlist


Hematology Playlist


Rheumatology Playlist


Endocrinology Playlist


Nephrology Playlist


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

**MEDICAL DISCLAIMER**: JJ Medicine does not provide medical advice, and the information available on this channel does not offer a diagnosis or advice regarding treatment. Information presented in these lessons is for educational purposes ONLY, and information presented here is not to be used as an alternative to a healthcare professional’s diagnosis and treatment of any person/animal.

Only a physician or other licensed healthcare professional are able to determine the requirement for medical assistance to be given to a patient. Please seek the advice of your physician or other licensed healthcare provider if you have any questions regarding a medical condition.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*Although I try my best to present accurate information, there may be mistakes in this video. If you do see any mistakes with information in this lesson, please comment and let me know.*

I am always looking for ways to improve my lessons! Please don't hesitate to leave me feedback and comments - all of your feedback is greatly appreciated! :) And please don't hesitate to send me any messages if you need any help - I will try my best to be here to help you guys :)

Thanks for watching! If you found this video helpful, please like and subscribe!
JJ


References:
Diagram of Life Cycle of Trypanosoma courtesy of Center for Disease Control and Prevention.
x

Chagas Disease | American Trypanosomiasis | Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Lesson on Chagas Disease (American Trypanosomiasis) : Causes, Symptoms and Treatment. Chagas Disease is caused by the parasitic protozoa Trypanosoma Cruzi. Trypanosoma cruzi protozoa are carried in the triatomine bug (aka Kissing Bug) from subfamily triatominae. When a person is bitten by a triatomine bug and fecal material from the Kissing bug enters the bite wound or a mucosa membrane, trypomastigotes enter the bloodstream of the infected individual. Trypomastigotes also enter tissues where they multiply by binary fission as amastigotes. Systems affected in Chagas Disease include the integumentary, cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal systems.

If you found this video helpful, please like and subscribe for more videos like this one :)

JJ

*Subscribe for more free medical lessons*

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
For books and more information on these topics


Support future lessons (and get other cool stuff) ➜

Follow me on Twitter! ➜

Come join me on Facebook! ➜

Start your own website with BlueHost ➜

Check out the best tool to help grow your YouTube channel (it’s helped me!)


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Check out some of my other lessons.

Medical Terminology - The Basics - Lesson 1:


Fatty Acid Synthesis Pathway:


Wnt/B Catenin Signaling Pathway:


Upper vs. Lower Motor Neuron Lesions:


Lesson on the Purine Synthesis and Salvage Pathway:


Gastrulation | Formation of Germ Layers:


Introductory lesson on Autophagy (Macroautophagy):


Infectious Disease Playlist


Dermatology Playlist


Pharmacology Playlist


Hematology Playlist


Rheumatology Playlist


Endocrinology Playlist


Nephrology Playlist


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

**MEDICAL DISCLAIMER**: JJ Medicine does not provide medical advice, and the information available on this channel does not offer a diagnosis or advice regarding treatment. Information presented in these lessons is for educational purposes ONLY, and information presented here is not to be used as an alternative to a healthcare professional’s diagnosis and treatment of any person/animal.

Only a physician or other licensed healthcare professional are able to determine the requirement for medical assistance to be given to a patient. Please seek the advice of your physician or other licensed healthcare provider if you have any questions regarding a medical condition.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*Although I try my best to present accurate information, there may be mistakes in this video. If you do see any mistakes with information in this lesson, please comment and let me know.*

I am always looking for ways to improve my lessons! Please don't hesitate to leave me feedback and comments - all of your feedback is greatly appreciated! :) And please don't hesitate to send me any messages if you need any help - I will try my best to be here to help you guys :)

Thanks for watching! If you found this video helpful, please like and subscribe!
JJ

References:
Diagram of Life Cycle of Chagas Disease courtesy of Center for Disease Control and Prevention.
x

African trypanosomiasis

The same video in English ⬇️

x

Sleeping sickness by trypanosoma

This disease video explains the sleeping sickness disease caused by trypanosoma and the symptoms of this disease and treatment.
For more information, log on to-

Download the study materials here-
x

Sleeping Sickness - an introduction to African Trypanosomiasis

Human African Trypanosomiasis, also known as sleeping sickness is a devastating parasitic disease. It is a neglected tropical disease affecting communities in Africa. In this video we take a look at the disease, how it presents and and ways to control it.

Useful resources:





Created by Ranil Appuhamy
Voice over by James Clark


Disclaimer: This video is for educational purposes only and you should talk to a health professional for specific health advice. Given the volume and changing nature of the evidence, information may not be complete, accurate or up to date.

KILLER DISEASES | How Sleeping Sickness Affects the Body

FIRST PUBLISHED 6 July 2016

By biting an infected person, the tsetse fly carries the parasites and transmits them when biting someone else. The parasites enter the lymphatic system and then the blood stream. Without treatment sleeping sickness is usually fatal: the parasites enter the brain impacting the nervous system and leading to disruptive sleep cycles, confusion, coma, and death.

Watch all of the Killer Diseases – Sleeping Sickness videos:
History:
Geography:
Body:
Treatment:
Future:

Learn more about DNDi's work to develop better treatments for Sleeping Sickness:

This video is part of the Killer Diseases series produced by MSF France, Allodocteurs, Réseau Canopé, Fondation Mérieux, universcience, Inserm, Institut Pasteur, and DNDi. Supported by les Investissements d’avenir.

KILLER DISEASES | A History of Sleeping Sickness

FIRST PUBLISHED 6 July 2016

Between the 14th and 19th centuries, sleeping sickness became increasingly common in Africa. Colonisation contributed to the spread of the disease through population displacements. The first treatment was developed in 1905. When interest in the disease declined around 1960, the tsetse fly reappeared causing severe epidemics.

Watch all of the Killer Diseases – Sleeping Sickness videos:
History:
Geography:
Body:
Treatment:
Future:

Learn more about DNDi's work to develop better treatments for Sleeping Sickness:

This video is part of the Killer Diseases series produced by MSF France, Allodocteurs, Réseau Canopé, Fondation Mérieux, universcience, Inserm, Institut Pasteur, and DNDi. Supported by les Investissements d’avenir.

Filipa Rijo-Ferreira (UTSW): Circadian Rhythms of the African Sleeping Sickness Parasite



Dr. Filipa Rijo-Ferreira shows that Trypanosoma brucei, the African sleeping sickness parasite, has circadian rhythms.

Trypanosoma brucei acts by disturbing the circadian rhythms, and therefore the sleep, of its host. But does T. brucei also have circadian rhythms? Dr. Filipa Rijo-Ferreira shows that yes, the African sleeping sickness parasite does have circadian rhythms and that they that regulate its metabolism. She demonstrates that African sleeping sickness parasites have an intrinsic circadian clock that is independent of the host, and which regulates parasite biology throughout the day.

This talk is part of the Young Scientist Seminars, a video series produced that features young scientists giving talks about their research and discoveries.

Speaker Biography:
Filipa Rijo-Ferreira received her bachelor’s degree in Molecular and Cellular Biology from Nova University of Lisbon. For her MSc she joined the laboratory of Dr. Charles Bangham at Imperial College London where she studied immunology and infection. As a graduate student at the University of Porto, she became fascinated with Molecular Parasitology and Circadian Rhythms, merging these two fields for her research. This was possible thanks to two very supportive scientists: her graduate mentor, Dr. Luisa Figueiredo, and her postdoctoral advisor, Dr. Joseph Takahashi. Filipa’s research aims to understand the daily host-parasite interactions, particularly, whether parasites have a molecular circadian clock that allows them to anticipate daily cycles. When not in the lab you can find Filipa sailing, reading at coffee shops or playing with her dog in the park

Sanofi: The latest developments in treatment for Human African Trypanosomiasis

Sanofi is committed to the research and development for tropical diseases, as well as the improvement of access to healthcare for all. Sue Saville went to the Headquarters of Sanofi and the World Health Organization find out a significant development for those affected by the potentially fatal sleeping sickness.

Find out more about RSTMH and how to become a member at

Trypanosoma Lifecycle | Trypanosoma gambiense lifecycle | Trypanosoma brucei | Trypanosomiasis

Find me on facebook :
Find me on instagram :

#trypanosoma #trypanosoma_gambiense #sleeping_sickness #gambiense #trypanosomalifecycle #trypanosoma_lifecycle #trypanosoma_gambiense_lilfecycle #trypanosoma_brucei #trypanosomiasis #sleeping_sickness
x

African Sleeping Sickness - (African trypanosomiasis)

Thanks for watching!
You can Donate to us here:
Please like, comment subscribe and share :)
To view our website click here:
To download this presentation click here:
Please check out our Patreon page here:
You can like our facebook page here:
You can follow us on instagram here:

Parasitic Diseases Lectures #9: African Trypanosomiasis

Dickson and Daniel discuss African trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense.

Human African Trypanosomiasis (#sleepingsickness #Trypanosomiasis #WHO)

African trypanosomes” or “Old World trypanosomes” are protozoan hemoflagellates of the genus Trypanosoma, in the subgenus Trypanozoon. Two subspecies that are morphologically indistinguishable cause distinct disease patterns in humans: T. b. gambiense, causing chronic African trypanosomiasis (“West African sleeping sickness”) and T. b. rhodesiense, causing acute African trypanosomiasis (“East African sleeping sickness”). The third subspecies T. b. brucei is a parasite primarily of cattle and occasionally other animals, and under normal conditions does not infect humans.

Life Cycle
lifecycle


During a blood meal on the mammalian host, an infected tsetse fly (genus Glossina) injects metacyclic trypomastigotes into skin tissue. The parasites enter the lymphatic system and pass into the bloodstream image . Inside the host, they transform into bloodstream trypomastigotes image , are carried to other sites throughout the body, reach other body fluids (e.g., lymph, spinal fluid), and continue the replication by binary fission image . The entire life cycle of African trypanosomes is represented by extracellular stages. The tsetse fly becomes infected with bloodstream trypomastigotes when taking a blood meal on an infected mammalian host image , image . In the fly’s midgut, the parasites transform into procyclic trypomastigotes, multiply by binary fission image , leave the midgut, and transform into epimastigotes image . The epimastigotes reach the fly’s salivary glands and continue multiplication by binary fission image . The cycle in the fly takes approximately 3 weeks. Rarely, T. b. gambiense may be acquired congenitally if the mother is infected during pregnancy.
Hosts and Vectors
Humans are considered the main reservoir for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, but this species can also be found in animals, including primates and ungulates. Domestic cattle are thought to be the most epidemiologically-relevant animal reservoir of T. b. rhodesiense. The only known vector for each is the tsetse fly (Glossina spp.).

Geographic Distribution
T. b. gambiense is endemic in West and Central Africa. T. b. rhodesiense is restricted to East and Southeast Africa. These ranges do not overlap, although in Uganda both subspecies are co-endemic, with T. b. gambiense found near the northern border and T. b. rhodesiense is found in the central and southern regions of that country.

Clinical Presentation
Infection occurs in two stages which may sometimes be preceded by the development of a trypanosomal chancre on the site of inoculation within days of being bitten by an infected fly (most commonly occurs with T. b. rhodesiense). First-stage disease (haemolymphatic) involves nonspecific signs and symptoms such as intermittent fever, pruritus and lymphadenopathy. Posterior triangle cervical lymphadenopathy, or “Winterbottom’s sign” is commonly seen in T. b. gambiense infections, but lymphadenopathy can also be seen in the axillar, inguinal and epitrochlear regions. Enlarged lymph nodes tend to be submandibular, axillary and inguinal in T. b. rhodesiense.

In the second-stage disease (meningoencephalitic), invasion of the central nervous system causes a variety of neuropsychiatric manifestations including sleep disorders, hence the common name “African sleeping sickness”. Severe cardiac involvement with electrocardiogram abnormalities consistent with perimyocarditis are also observed. These alterations are generally mild in in T. b. gambiense infections but are more severe and appear earlier in T. b. rhodesiense infections. The course of infection is much more acute and rapid with T. b. rhodesiense than T. b. gambiense, and both infections are almost invariably fatal without treatment

Webinar: African Sleeping Sickness - Trypanosomiasis (2014)

RECORDED June 11, 2014 -- Dr. James Foulkes presents African Sleeping Sickness diagnosis and treatment. Sign up to receive notifications of future webinars:

Trypanosoma (Sleeping sickness) Life cycle ,pathogenicity, structure , treatment #trypanosomiasis

Hello friends
My self Anurag saini
MBBS from Sp medical clz Bikaner
Here I try to share my views about trypanosoma
To all my friends
Hope it might be helpful
Thanku ❤️
x

What do you know about Human African Trypanosomiasis (Sleeping Sickness)?

Animation that explains what is Human African Trypanosomiasis -also known as Sleeping Sickness- and how does it spread.

Nobel Prize Explained: The Frightening Sleeping Sickness

Want to support the channel? Be a patron at:


Subscribe for future videos in this series!
When it comes to infectious diseases, there are 5 major groups of organisms. These are: Bacteria, Fungi, Viruses, Helminths and Protozoans.
Now this video is all about protozoans. Protozoas are single cell organisms that can be independent or dependent on other organisms (parasite). First described in 1818, they bounced around from classification to classification until they arrived at their own.
Protozoans are some pretty unique organisms. They all reproduce asexually. Some life in two-phase life cycle, one where they grow and reproduce, and another stage where they lay as dormant cyst to survive harsh conditions.

Protozoans are found everywhere. Free living protozoans are seen commonly in fresh and salt water, soil, mosses. The big baddy - malaria is caused by the parasitic protozoan plasmodium. That was talked about in another video and will continue to be talked about in future videos – because malaria is awful.
Another protozoan caused disease is African trypanosomiasis - quite a mouthful. However its colloquically known as slieeping sickness.Sleeping sickness is caused by the protozoan trypanosoma brucei, and that’s what gives it the name (iasis- morbid condition). Where as malaria’s plasmodium is spread by the alophes? Mosquito, sleeping sickness is spread by infected tsetse flies.

The disease affects mainly sub-Saharan arica and infects around 10,000 people a year, with the death toll ranging from 2-4k. However, concerted prevention methods like bug repellent and long sleeve clothing, sand early detection and treatment has reduced that down from the tens of thousands in the 1990s.
At first infection, a patient exhibits flu like symptoms – you know, fever, headaches, joint pains. However they don’t call it African flu-like illness. No, as the disease progresses, the parasite invades the blood brain barrier and affects the brain patients develop confusion, numbness and disorganized sleep – with episodes of daytime sleep and periods of wakefulness.. coupled with possible psychosis and you have a nightmare factory. Treating it early is imperative and if untreated, it typically results in death.

So yeah, horrible diseases that protozoans can cause, and for a long time we didn’t know that protozoans were responsible for these disease. Enter Charles laveran. Charles Laveran was a French doctor born in 1845. Son of a doctor, he followed in his fathers profession and entered medical school. His chief research was in malaria. Now in a previous video, we discussed how a Nobel Prize was reward on the identification of the life cycle and transmission through the mosquito, but the exact organism was less identified.
He studied the organs and blood of malaria pt. The only common factor was that they all shared a pigmented granule in their blood. This led him to believe Laveran believed it to be due to a blood parasite. So he found someone who was just infected and quickly drew and examined the blood and actually saw plasmodium moving. He would follow similar experiments on protozoans such as trypnaosimais. For his discovery of protozoans and their role in malaria and sleeping sickness, he was awarded the nobel prize in 1907.

Disclaimer:
These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any LY Med video.

life cycle of trypanosoma ||trypanosomiasis ( sleeping sickness ) made easy

#trypanosomiasis #sleepingsickness
#trypanosoma #lifecycleoftrypanosoma

The hunt for the hidden parasites

African Trypanosomiasis, also known as 'sleeping sickness', is caused by microscopic parasites and is transmitted by the tsetse fly in parts of rural Africa.

But despite screening and methods for controlling the flies that transmit the infection, each year there are still cases of sleeping sickness.

In Guinea, west Africa, a team of scientists are now taking samples from people’s skin to see if that’s where the parasites are hiding. If the parasites can live in people’s skin, as well as their blood, it might explain why sleeping sickness is still a problem in Guinea.

Read the full story:

#Trypanosomiasis: (Sleeping sickness) New lecture

Its about sleeping sickness, parasites strategy of survival, immune escape, life cycle and diagnosis. The immune escape strategy of the parasite is quite a thrilling story wherein the parasite intends to reach its final destination and uses different tools to allude immune responses.

Shares

x

Check Also

x

Menu