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Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 - Christopher Clark

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Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 - Christopher Clark

This lecture explores new ways of understanding the crisis that brought war to Europe in the summer of 1914; reflects on some of the problems of interpretation that have dogged the debate over the war's origins; and considers the contemporary resonance of a catastrophe that is now nearly a century old.

The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College Website:

Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website.

Website: gresham.ac.uk
Twitter: twitter.com/GreshamCollege
Facebook: facebook.com/greshamcollege
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How Europe Went to War in 1914: The Origins Debate Revisited

Chris Clark, Regius Professor of History, Cambridge University, presented the Annual Byrn Lecture, How Europe Went to War in 1914: The Origins Debate Revisited, on April 8, 2015 at Vanderbilt University. Bestselling author of The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914.

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Margaret MacMillan: European Society and War 1814-1914

Margaret MacMillan delivers the opening lecture of her Humanitas Visiting Professorship in War Studies at the University of Cambridge, 2013-2014.


Humanitas is a series of Visiting Professorships at Oxford and Cambridge designed to bring leading academics, practitioners and scholars to both universities to address major themes in the arts, social sciences and humanities. Created by Lord Weidenfeld, the programme is managed and funded by the Institute for Strategic Dialogue and co-ordinated in Cambridge by the Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH) and in Oxford by the Humanities Division.
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How Europe Went to War in 1914. Tans Lecture Maastricht University

Christopher Clark revisits the century-old debate on the outbreak of the First World War, highlighting the complexity of a crisis that involved sudden changes in the international system. Clark proposes fresh perspectives on an old question.
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Christopher Clarke - How Europe Went to War in 1914

Few episodes in the history of modern Europe have attracted such intense and lasting historical interest as the July Crisis of 1914. The chain of events that led to the outbreak of World War One still offers one of the most dramatic and intellectually enthralling narratives in modern history. Yet the size and sophistication of the existing secondary literature poses a challenge: how to generate fresh insights into a crisis that has preoccupied historians and generated controversy for nearly a century. This public lecture revisits the crisis of 1914, reflects on trends in the recent and older writing on the outbreak of war and examines some new angles of approach. Christopher Clark is Regius Professor History at the University of Cambridge and a fellow of St Catharine’s College, Cambridge.

The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 | Book Review

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Sources:

Clark, Christopher. The Sleepwalkers: How Europe went to war in 1914. (London: Allen Lane, 2012).

Europe: Then and Now, featuring Professor Christopher Clark

Please join us for a fascinating conversation with Christopher Clark, Professor of Modern European History at Cambridge University and author of The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 as we discuss the most significant events that led to the outbreak of World War I during this year's centenary commemoration and reflect on the contemporary similarities. Once again, Europe is witnessing resurgent nationalism that has led to the rise of extremist groups seeking to undermine the status quo. Russia, too, is once more emboldened by the perceived imperative to defend its ethnic and religious kin abroad. And the U.S., exhausted after decades of involvement overseas, has adopted a foreign policy increasingly reminiscent of pre-Wilsonian isolationism. Professor Clark will examine the historic parallels between Europe then and now, and share his thoughts on why Europe went to war in 1914.
Europe, Then and Now:
Parallels between 1914 and 2014 Considered

featuring

Professor Christopher Clark
Author of The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914
Professor of Modern European History, Cambridge University

moderated by

Ms. Heather Conley
Director and Senior Fellow, CSIS Europe Program

The start of WWI: Was there a long-term plan? - Christopher Clark

The descent into World War One was both swift and terrible. There were a great number of contributing ideas and strategies, but were any of them very forward-looking?
Christopher Clark response is: “You look in vain for long-term strategies in Europe at this time.”

This extract is taken from a Gresham College lecture:


Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,600 lectures free to access or download from the website.
Website:
Twitter:
Facebook:

2015 Laura Shannon Prize with Sir Christopher Clark

Sir Christopher Clark, Regius Professor of History at St. Catharine’s College at the University of Cambridge (UK), and author of the award-winning book The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914 presented the 2015 Laura Shannon Prize Lecture at the University of Notre Dame. The prize is sponsored by the Nanovic Institute for European Studies, part of Notre Dame's Keough School of Global Affairs.

For more information, visit

With introductions by A. James McAdams, Director and William M. Scholl Professor of International Affairs and Michael
Zuckert, Nancy R. Dreux Professor in the Department of Political Science, and a member of the final jury for the Laura Shannon Prize in Contemporary European Studies.

November 19, 2015
Jordan Auditorium, Mendoza College of Business
University of Notre Dame

What role did Diplomacy have in Europe's descent into war in 1914? - Christopher Clark

There were embassies all over Europe – why weren’t they able to halt the descent into the First World War in 1914?

Christopher Clark explains the role of international diplomacy in this extract taken from a Gresham College lecture:


Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,600 lectures free to access or download from the website.
Website:
Twitter:
Facebook:
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Why did Britain enter the First World War? The Russian Question - Professor Christopher Clark

Did Britain enter World War I in order to defend Belgium, or was it merely in order to appease the great threat of Russian aggression?
Professor Christopher Clark picks his way through this tricky question.
It was a question of whom do you appease and whom do you oppose.

This is an extract taken from a Gresham College lecture:


Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,600 lectures free to access or download from the website.
Website:
Twitter:
Facebook:

Libya, Italy and the start of World War One - Christopher Clark

How did Libya and Italy contribute to the start of World War One? Christopher Clark explains the importance to the First Wolrd War of the relatively little-known Italian invasion of the territories that today are Libya. This is an extract taken from a Gresham College lecture: Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,600 lectures free to access or download from the website. Website: Twitter: Facebook:

Sean McMeekin | July 1914: Countdown to War - January 29, 2014

In a discussion of his new book, historian Sean McMeekin reveals how a small cabal of European statesmen used the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand to initiate a long-awaited showdown among the Continent's powers, ultimately leading to the start of World War I.

Brady Lecture 2015: Christopher Clark


The Goethe-Institut presents the 2014 Philip Brady Lecture on board the HMS President, given by Professor Christopher Clark, titled How Europe Went to War in 1914. The lectures are in honour of Philip Brady.

Christopher Clark: The 1848 Revolutions

Why should we think about the Revolutions of 1848 now? Christopher Clark provides some answers in his LRB Winter Lecture, delivered at the British Museum on 15 February 2019.

Read more from Christopher Clark in the LRB:

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ABOUT THE LRB

The LRB is Europe’s leading magazine of books and ideas. Published twice a month, it provides a space for some of the world’s best writers to explore a wide variety of subjects in exhilarating detail – from culture and politics to science and technology via history and philosophy. In the age of the long read, the LRB remains the pre-eminent exponent of the intellectual essay, admired around the world for its fearlessness, its range and its elegance.

As well as essays and book reviews each issue also contains poems, an exhibition review, ‘short cuts’, letters and a diary, and is available in print, online, and offline via our app. Subscribers enjoy unlimited access to almost 15,000 articles in our digital archive. Our website features a regular blog and a channel of audio and video content, including podcasts, author interviews and highlights from the events programme at the London Review Bookshop.
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Book Review - The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914

Patrick really likes WWI. He talks about it in this video.

The War of 1914: An Avoidable Catastrophe - Sean McMeekin

Sean McMeekin is Professor of History at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y.

Rejecting earlier accounts of the outbreak of World War I, which emphasized structural factors or German ‘premeditation,’ McMeekin proposes instead a series of contingent occurrences stretching from the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo on June 28 to the British ultimatum to Berlin on Aug. 4, 1914. Far from fated by the alliance system or the arms race, the war of 1914 was an eminently avoidable catastrophe brought on by the opportunistic scheming by a small handful of statesmen, often driven as much by personal complexes and rivalries as by compelling reasons of state. Though aware, in some sense, of the risks they were running, none of the men responsible could have imagined the scale of the human catastrophe they were about to unleash.

Presented November 7, 2014 as part of the National World War I Museum and United States World War I Centennial Commission 2014 Symposium, 1914: Global War & American Neutrality.

The Symposium was held in association with The Western Front Association East Coast Branch and the World War I Historical Association. Sponsored by Colonel J's, the Neighborhood Tourist Development Fund and Verlag Militaria.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Christopher Clark / Christian Ingrao - Commemorating 1914: exploring the war's legacy

Inaugural Session - Zagreb, May 5th 2014
Ensemble TRIS, Vienna
Inaugural speeches : Mrs Michèle Boccoz (Ambassador of France in Croatia), Mrs Andrea Zlatar-Violic (Ministry of Culture -Croatia)
Lecture : Mr Christopher CLARK, University of Cambridge The Sleepwalkers - How Europe went to War in 1914.
Mr.Christian INGRAO, The National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) First World War, the matrix of mass violence
International Symposium organised by EUNIC Croatia at Croatian State Archives.

Historiker Christopher Clark zum Ausbruch des Ersten Weltkriegs

Der renommierte Historiker Christopher Clark spricht im Interview mit LW-Kulturjournalist Jean-Louis Scheffen über den Ausbruch des Ersten Weltkriegs.

Deborah Neill: Origins of the First World War

The Agenda in the Summer examines the causes and events leading up to the First World War from a perspective many don't normally consider - Germany's. Can the destructive war that consumed much of the world be laid at the feet of one country? York History Professor Deborah Neill sits down to discuss how we look at Germany's role 100 years later.

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