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South Korea’s declining birth rate

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South Korea’s declining birth rate

There are concerns about the declining birth rate in South Korea, which could reduce the workforce and increase the cost of social services. Others are looking at why it’s going down. Some say women are on a “birth strike” because of a wage gap and the traditional division of household labour.

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South Korea's Extreme Birth Rate Crisis

Despite pouring some 130 billion USD over the last 13 years into boosting the birth rate, South Koreans may go extinct by 2750. Here is our look at why.

Video by Youjin Do.
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Korea's declining birth rate - The end of KOREA!

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Korea's total fertility rate falls to 1.01 in Q1

1분기 합계출산율 1.01명...전년 동기 대비 0.07명 감소

South Korea's fertility rate has continued to fall.
According to Statistics Korea today, there were 27-thousand births recorded in March, down near 10 percent on-year, making it the lowest figure for March on record.
We have our business correspondent Kim Hyesung in the studio with us for more on this.
Hyesung, so how serious is this low birth rate problem?
Right Aram.
The number of births in Korea has been falling on-year every month since December 2015.
Fertility rate is defined as the total number of children that a woman will have in her lifetime.
Low birth rate is a phenomenon seen in many advanced countries around the world, but Korea has seen that happen very rapidly.
For the first quarter of this year, the total fertility rate was at one-point-zero-one, down from one-point-zero-seven in the first quarter of the previous year.
For 2018, Korea's total fertility rate recorded zero-point-98, falling below one.
The rate has been falling since the 1970s when it was at 4-point-five. It dropped below three in the mid-1970s, then below 2 in mid-1980s.
Korea has the lowest fertility rate out of 35 countries in the OECD. In fact, it is the only country with a rate below one.
Demographers have said a country's fertility rate needs to be at least 2-point-one for its population to be stable, or for Korea's population to remain at around 50 million.
According to National Assembly data, at a rate of 1-point-two, South Korea could face natural extinction by 2750.
With the rate currently at just 1, this so-called natural extinction could happen earlier than 2750.

Natural extinction. wow. I see how rapidly the Korean population is falling. What are the exact socioeconomic implications resulting from the low fertility rate then?
More than anything, it could lower Korea's economic growth.
Falling birth rates mean a shrinking working population, those aged between 15 and 64, which is currently around 37 million people.
But on top of the falling fertility rate, Korea has an increasing aging population
Korea already became an aged society in 2017, with those over the age of 65 accounting for more than 14 percent of the total population.
Economic growth depends on capital, labor and technology.
With the working population falling, it basically means lower consumption, production from companies will drop, investment falls, unemployment goes up and saving falls, leading to lower public tax revenue.
This whole cycle drives down the potential economic growth rate, weighing on the Korean economy which already faces slower growth.
The burden on young people to support the elderly also goes up.
The number of elderly that need to be supported per 100 people of working age in Korea would increase past 100 in 2067, a faster rate than any other OECD country.
On top of a creating a pension shortfall problem, the government's higher social welfare spending for the elderly could also lead to a fiscal deficit, like some southern European countries. That would in turn worsen the foreign trade balance, affect the value of Korean won and even the financial and fiscal system.

I see. But the low birthrate is not a new issue though. What have been some of the government measures to tackle this? or any recommendations?
In fact, the Korean government has spent about 130 billion U.S. dollars over the past 13 years to try to increase the fertility rate.
That's around 56-thousand dollars per child in incentives.
The government has used it to provide more daycare centers, support child-rearing costs, and provide new housing assistance for newlyweds.
...

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Why is Korea's Birth Rate So Low? 한국의 출산율이 낮은 이유

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Korea now has the lowest birth rate amongst OECD countries. The numbers from Statistics Korea for 2017 were just released about two weeks ago, and are quite shocking. Since this has been in the news a lot over the last couple of years, we thought it would be interesting to talk about the low fertility rate in Korea, particularly the reasons experts say are behind it.

*The statistics we shared are from Statistics Korea, and
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South Korea Birth Rate: Fertility rate lowest in the world

It was once considered a natural progression of life to grow up, get married and have children. But in South Korea young couples are increasingly choosing to keep pets rather than have children. They blame the cost of living and the pressure of work. Sarah Morice explains how their decisions may be jeopardising the economy.
#SouthKorea #BirthRate #fertility

4 Angles _ Korea's Extremely Low Birth Rate: Causes and Solutions

Korea's Extremely Low Birth Rate: Causes and Solutions
With the lowest birth rate among OECD member nations, Korea is at high risk of diminished population. With youth unwilling to marry and prohibitively high costs of child-rearing, fewer and fewer people are having children. We examine the causes of Korea's low birth rate, and consider possible solutions to address the issue.

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[Foreign Correspondents] LOW BIRTH RATE, DEMOGRAPHIC CLIFF?

S. Korea undergoing a population shock, as deaths expected to outnumber births for the first time in 2019 출생아보다 사망자가 더 많아지는 2019년 한국 사회를 뒤흔드는 인구 쇼크

South Korea's population is on the decline. According to projections released by Statistics Korea on March 27, the number of deaths in the country is expected to outpace the number of births for the first time this year, with the population being forecast to fall in earnest beginning in 2028. The rapid decline in the working-age population (between the ages of 15 and 64) is already underway, with signs indicating that the country is on the verge of falling off a demographic cliff. The low birth rate and the aging/falling population is expected to have a wide-reaching impact on South Korean society. The legal criteria of a senior citizen, the vulnerable pension scheme, and the increasing burden on young people to care for the elderly, have all emerged as issues of serious concern over the last few years. The demographic crisis is also likely to have a direct impact on the economy, including potential losses in productivity. In this week's edition of 'Foreign Correspondents', we sit down with our panel of journalists to talk about the various issue related to South Korea's population crisis, and what we can do to better protect future generations from its adverse side effects

Ann Babe / U.S. News & World Report
Frédéric Ojardias / RFI
Sakabe Tetsuo / NNA

한국의 인구가 줄어들고 있다. 3월 27일 통계청이 발표한 ‘2017~2067년 장래인구특별추계’에 따르면 한국은 올해부터 사망자가 출생아보다 많아지는 자연감소가 시작될 것으로 전망된다. 또한 2028년에는 총인구가 감소할 것이라고 내다봤다. 특히 생산가능인구(15∼64세)의 비율이 급속도로 줄어드는 ‘인구절벽’ 현상은 이미 진행 중인 것으로 드러났다. 저출산 현상과 초고령화 사회로의 진입에 따른 급격한 인구 감소는 한국 사회를 전 방위적으로 바꿔놓을 전망이다. 법적으로 정해진 ‘노인’ 연령의 상향, 연금 고갈 우려, 젊은 세대의 노인 부양 부담 증가 등은 이미 몇 년 전부터 꾸준히 논란이 되어 왔다. 한편 인구문제는 경제문제와도 직결되는 만큼, 앞으로 국가 생산성 감소가 우려되고 있는데... 인구 감소의 시대를 맞은 지금, 우리는 다음 세대를 위해 어떤 대책을 세워야 할까? 이번 주 에선 한국 사회의 큰 고민거리로 떠오른 인구 쇼크를 주제로 다양한 이야기를 나눠본다.

앤 베이브 (Ann Babe / 미국 U.S. News & World Report 외신기자)
프레데릭 오자르디아스 (Frédéric Ojardias / 프랑스 공영방송 RFI 외신기자)
사카베 테츠오 (Sakabe Tetsuo / 일본 NNA 외신기자)

Do Koreans Want To Get Married? [Street Interview] | ASIAN BOSS

South Korea has one of the lowest birth rate in the world. The number of children a woman is projected to have within a lifetime, fell to 0.95 in 2018’s third quarter, far short of the 2.1 needed to maintain stability, according to demographers. ASIAN BOSS hit the streets of Seoul, South Korea to find out how ordinary Koreans feel about these stats.

Special thanks to our Asian Boss reporter, Jasper.

Our vision is to build a lasting grassroots movement of young people from every country to report on real social and cultural issues. We believe having meaningful discussions with people with different opinions is extremely important. We also believe that any ordinary person can deliver real news and commentary. Through our original and in-depth interviews of real people, we will challenge you - the global youth - to think critically and challenge various cultural and social issues. If this resonates with you, try to get involved in any capacity and volunteer for ASIAN BOSS ►

For business or media inquiries, reach out to us at askasianboss@gmail.com

Reach out to our founders, Stephen and Kei, directly if you have any questions, feedback or suggestions:

Stephen on Twitter ►
Stephen on Instagram ►
Kei on Instagram ►

Are you curious about real people's perspectives from Asia on various cultural and social issues? Subscribe to ASIAN BOSS for more informative and thought-provoking videos ►

#marriage #korea #asianboss

S. Korea's population expected to decline sooner than expected: Statistics Korea official

한국 인구감소 시기 당겨진다…빠르면 5년내 닥칠수도

South Korea has one of the lowest birthrates in the world, coupled with a rapidly ageing society.
Now the situation looks like it's going to get worse -- experts think the country's population is going to start shrinking several years sooner than expected.
Oh Soo-young tells us more.
South Korea could see its population start falling sooner than expected.
According to a government official, the country's data agency Statistics Korea expects that the population will begin to decline before 2028.
The agency had said previously that the number of South Koreans would likely start shrinking around 2032,... and the birthrate to fall substantially by 2028.
However, noting that the fertility rate in recent years has been sliding faster than expected,... the official hinted that the population outlook will be adjusted in the agency's upcoming report this month.
A presidential committee on the birthrate estimates that around 325-thousand children were born last year,... marking an all-time annual low,... as the birthrate fell to zero-point-nine-seven -- for the first time, less than one child born per woman.
The country already has the lowest fertility rate among the 35 OECD member countries,... whose average in 2017 was one-point-six-eight children.
Korea needs at least two-point-one children born per woman... in order to retain its current population.
Some experts say the figuressuggest an even faster decline in the country's population,... warning it could come within the next five years.
At the same time,... the number of senior citizens is expected to grow dramatically... as many baby boomers start retiring next year,... a concern for the country's balance of population and productivity.
Oh Soo-young, Arirang News.

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South Korea's fertility rate falls below one baby per woman in 2018

한국 작년 합계출산율 0.98명

South Korea's total fertility rate continues to notch concerning figures.
Latest data shows the number of children that would be born to each woman if she were to live to the end of her child bearing years,... fell to a record low last year.
Kim Hyesung help us look beyond the digits.
South Korea’s total fertility rate fell to zero-point-98 in 2018.
With a rate of 1-point-17 in 2016, it was already the lowest in the OECD.
Now it is the only country in the OECD that has a total fertility rate below one much lower than the OECD average of 1-point-68.
Statistics Korea attributed the decline in childbirths to the falling number of marriages and the falling number of women aged between 30 and 34, which dropped five percent on-year in 2018.
Another reason for fewer babies is that more people are starting their families later, which raises the age at which women give birth.
The average age that Korean women gave birth in 2018 was 32-point-eight years, two years older than the average age a decade ago.
According to Statistics Korea, more babies were born to mothers in their late 30s than to those in their late 20s.
After hitting 4-point-five in 1971, Korea's total fertility rate has been in continuous decline.
The number of babies born last year fell near nine percent on-year to around 327-thousand, following declines of 12 percent and seven percent in the two previous years.
The falling fertility rate comes despite the Korean government's efforts to tackle the problem by spending over 80 billion U.S. dollars over the past decade to try to increase the fertility rate, including subsidized childcare leave, free nurseries and cash stipends.
The lower fertility rate hurts potential economic growth as production and consumption falls. It also has a negative effect on employment and could lead to a pension shortfall problem. Raising the overall quality of life and improving the work-life balance is ultimately the key to stopping the fall in fertility rate.
A fertility rate of 2-point-1 is considered the replacement rate that is needed to keep the country's population level stable at around 50 million people.
But according to Statistics Korea, the fertility rate is expected to continue to fall through 2021.
Kim Hyesung, Arirang News.

#SouthKorea #fertilityrate #falls #baby

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S. Korea's population expected to decline sooner than expected: Statistics Korea official

한국 인구감소 시기 당겨진다…빠르면 5년내 닥칠수도
South Korea has one of the lowest birthrates in the world, coupled with a rapidly ageing society.
Now the situation looks like it's going to get worse -- experts think the country's population is going to start shrinking several years sooner than expected.
Oh Soo-young tells us more.
South Korea could see its population start falling sooner than expected.
According to a government official, the country's data agency Statistics Korea expects that the population will begin to decline before 2028.
The agency had said previously that the number of South Koreans would likely start shrinking around 2032,... and the birthrate to fall substantially by 2028.
However, noting that the fertility rate in recent years has been sliding faster than expected,... the official hinted that the population outlook will be adjusted in the agency's upcoming report this month.
A presidential committee on the birthrate estimates that around 325-thousand children were born last year,... marking an all-time annual low,... as the birthrate fell to zero-point-nine-seven -- for the first time, less than one child born per woman.
The country already has the lowest fertility rate among the 35 OECD member countries,... whose average in 2017 was one-point-six-eight children.
Korea needs at least two-point-one children born per woman... in order to retain its current population.
Some experts say the figuressuggest an even faster decline in the country's population,... warning it could come within the next five years.
At the same time,... the number of senior citizens is expected to grow dramatically... as many baby boomers start retiring next year,... a concern for the country's balance of population and productivity.
Oh Soo-young, Arirang News.




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Low Birthrate Shrinks South Korea's Youth Population

Due to a low birthrate, there are now fewer than 10 million young people in South Korea for first time in decades, a trend with implications for the country's economic future. The WSJ's Yun-Hee Kim speaks to reporter Kwanwoo Jun in Seoul.

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KOREA'S LOW BIRTH RATE / KBS뉴스(News)

[Anchor Lead]
The so-called demographic cliff is observed not only in rural communities and small cities, but also in large metropolises. One public kindergarten in Daejeon, a city with a population of 1.5 million, got only one applicant during the kindergarten admissions period last month. More than half of the city's public kindergartens failed to meet their quotas of incoming students.
[Pkg]
This kindergarten is affiliated with an elementary school in Daejeon. Only one child applied to this kindergarten for the school year 2020 during the admission period that ended on November 29th. More than half or 53 out of 103 national and public kindergartens in Daejeon failed to get enough applicants to fill their student capacities. National and public kindergartens used to see fiercer competition for admission than private ones, but now the table has been turned. The lack of kindergarteners has caused concerns to mount over the possibility of a school-age demographic cliff occurring in the Daejeon area. Already experiencing a steady decline in population, the city of Daejeon's birthrate for the third quarter this year stood at only 0.84%, the lowest in the nation. Experts believe that kindergartens and schools will not be able to fill their capacities repeatedly. Some critics point out that the Daejeon Office of Education came up short in coming up with countermeasures although some kindergartens affiliated with elementary schools in the city filled only 20 to 30% of their student bodies last year.
[Soundbite] KIM IN-SHIK(DAEJEON METROPOLITAN COUNCIL MEMBER) : The Daejeon Office of Education failed to come up with countermeasures like adjusting kindergarten quotas or merging classes.
The Daejeon Metropolitan Office of Education says that it does not plan to reduce the kindergarten student quotas although the declining number of school-aged children is impacting all areas of the city.

It's never late to have a child...More women give birth in their late 30's in South Korea

출산율 - 30대 후반 여성 역대 최고 등
The number of babies born in Korea went up in 2015 compared to the year before.
It's welcome news for a country with one of the lowest birthrates in the world.
Most notably, the number of women giving birth in their 30s rose sharply.
Lee Unshin has the details.
Korea saw the highest birthrate among those in their late 30s in 2015, according to the latest data.
According to Statistics Korea on Wednesday, the birthrate among women in the age range between 35 and 39 stood at 48.3 in 2015, a record high as well as a nearly 12 percent increase compared to the year before.
Along with that, the birthrate for the age group of 30 to 34 also saw an increase of 2.5 percent between 2014 and 2015.
And the average age of Korean women giving birth for the first time stands now at 32-point-2,...also a jump of 0.2, than the previous year.

[Korean- ]

Nowadays, Korean women are deciding to wait until later in life to get married, due to a number of reasons, but the biggest one in my opinion, is the desire to invest more time and energy on themselves first....which explains why women in their 30s have a higher birthrate than women in their 20s.

The nation's total projected number of children born per one woman, known as 'total fertility rate'...was 1.24 in 2015, an increase from the previous year's rate of 1.21.
The recent hikes in birth and fertility rates, in other words, represent nearly 3,000 newborns between 2014 and 2015.
However, these figures are still significantly lower compared to the OECD average of 1.68.
Moreover, of all 34 OECD nations, the only country that has a lower fertility rate than Korea is Portugal, with a rate of 1.23.

Although there have been gradual increases in birth and fertility rates, experts say that it may still take a while for Korea to see a significant boost in population growth.
Lee Un-shin, Arirang News.

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South Korea's fertility rate falls below one baby per woman in 2018

한국 작년 합계출산율 0.98명

Latest data shows South Korea's total fertility rate, defined as the number of children that would be born to each woman if she were to live to the end of her child bearing years,... fell to a record low last year.
Kim Hyesung reports.
South Korea’s total fertility rate fell to zero-point-98 in 2018.
With a rate of 1-point-17 in 2016, it was already the lowest in the OECD.
Now it is the only country in the OECD that has a total fertility rate below one -- much lower than the OECD average of 1-point-68.
Statistics Korea attributed the decline in childbirths to the falling number of marriages and the falling number of women aged between 30 and 34, which dropped five percent on-year in 2018.
Another reason for fewer babies is that more people are starting their families later, which raises the age at which women give birth.
The average age that Korean women gave birth in 2018 was 32-point-eight years, two years older than the average age a decade ago.
According to Statistics Korea, more babies were born to mothers in their late 30s than to those in their late 20s.
After hitting 4-point-five in 1971, Korea's total fertility rate has been in continuous decline.
The number of babies born last year fell near nine percent on-year to around 327-thousand, following declines of 12 percent and seven percent in the two previous years.
The falling fertility rate comes despite the Korean government's efforts to tackle the problem by spending over 80 billion U.S. dollars over the past decade to try to increase the fertility rate, including subsidized childcare leave, free nurseries and cash stipends.
The lower fertility rate hurts potential economic growth as production and consumption falls. It also has a negative effect on employment and could lead to a pension shortfall problem. Raising the overall quality of life and improving the work-life balance is ultimately the key to stopping the fall in fertility rate.
A fertility rate of 2-point-1 is considered the replacement rate that is needed to keep the country's population level stable at around 50 million people.
But according to Statistics Korea, the fertility rate is expected to continue to fall through 2021.
Kim Hyesung, Arirang News.

#SouthKorea #fertilityrate #falls #baby

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Are Koreans Really Not Dating Anymore? | ASIAN BOSS

According to a recent CNN article, young Koreans aren’t dating because it’s either too expensive or too dangerous. But is this actually true? We hit the streets of Seoul to find out.

The opinions expressed in this video are those of individual interviewees alone and do not reflect the views of ASIAN BOSS or the general Korean population.

Tina (Host)
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Yunjee (Reporter)
Instagram ►

Our vision is to build a lasting grassroots movement of young people from every country to report on real social and cultural issues. We believe having meaningful discussions with people with different opinions is extremely important. We also believe that any ordinary person can deliver real news and commentary. Through our original and in-depth interviews of real people, we will challenge you - the global youth - to think critically and challenge various cultural and social issues. If this resonates with you, try to get involved in any capacity and volunteer for ASIAN BOSS ►

For business or media inquiries, reach out to us at askasianboss@gmail.com

Reach out to our founders, Stephen and Kei, directly if you have any questions, feedback or suggestions:

Stephen on Twitter ►
Stephen on Instagram ►
Kei on Instagram ►

Are you curious about real people's perspectives from Asia on various cultural and social issues? Subscribe to ASIAN BOSS for more informative and thought-provoking videos ►

#Dating #Relationships #AsianBoss

S. Korea childbirths decline for 38th straight month

천명당 태어나는 아이 연간 6명 미만…5월 출생아 또 최저

The number of babies born in Korea continues to hit new lows.
Fewer couples are getting married, and not many of those who tie the knot are not having kids.
Seo Eunkyung provides a breakdown of the digits.
According to Statistics Korea, the number of babies born this May came to 25-thousand-3-hundred, a decline on year of 9-point-6 percent.
The on-year figure has been going down for 38 straight months, and May was also the lowest figure for that month since the data was first collected in 1981.
In terms of the number of newborns per one thousand people, the figure in May was just 5-point-8.
This is the first time the figure has gone below six per 1-thousand since it was first compiled in 2000.
This has prompted a number of big conglomerates to encourage their male employees to take paternity leave.
And taking the lead is SK Group.
Its subsidiary SK Innovation, from this Monday, is allowing new dads 10 days of leave with pay.
Until now, they'd gotten 3 days of paid leave and 2 days of unpaid leave.
Chipmaker SK Hynix has also expanded paternity leave to 10 days from the previous three days starting from July 4th.
As for Samsung Electronics, it's extended leave for new fathers of twins... from 10 days to 20.
The law requires companies to grant men 3 days of paid leave when their spouses give birth, and at the same time an increasing number of Korean companies, especially conglomerates, are encouraging their workers to exercise their rights as a parent.
SEO Eunkyung, Arirang News.

#childbirths #babiesborn #Skorea

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The Women Behind South Korea's #NoMarriage Trend

Meet Baek Ha-na and Jung Se-young, the women behind South Korea's #NoMarriage trend. The country has the lowest fertility rate in the developed world, according to the World Bank.

Baeck Ha-na works in accounting during the week. On weekends, she’s a YouTube star in South Korea, promoting the “live-alone life.”

Baeck, whose YouTube channel in English is called “Solo-darity,” objects to being called a “mi-hon” -- someone who is not yet married. She’s part of a growing and determined group of Korean women rejecting marriage and motherhood.

Such decisions are intensifying demographic and economic challenges for the government as the country faces one of the world’s lowest birth rates and a shortfall in pension funding that is getting harder to close with fewer workers joining the labor force.

“Society made me feel like a failure for being in my 30’s and not yet a wife or a mother,” Baeck said. “Instead of belonging to someone, I now have a more ambitious future for myself.”

Baeck and her YouTube co-host maintain that the government’s current approach infuriates many women. They argue that the latest efforts to boost birthrates are “abusive” and “frustrating” because they fail to address the lack of legal avenues to ensure career development for mothers or alleviating financial burdens in raising children.

When it comes to the birth rate, South Korea has ranked at the bottom of OECD countries in the Asia-Pacific region since 2016, with that rate going even lower this year. According to data compiled by the World Bank, South Korea and Puerto Rico tied for the lowest overall rates as of 2017: Seven children per 1,000 people, followed by Japan and Hong Kong.

Data from South Korea’s national statistics agency in April showed the number of births dropped even further as of February, a 7% decline from a year earlier. In 2019, the number of those dying is expected to outpace the number of those being born, the report said.

A separate report from the agency shows fewer women believe marriage is a must. In 2010, 64.7% of women in South Korea answered that marriage is required for women, while 48.1% gave the same response in 2018.

South Korea’s government is reacting by offering incentives to encourage marriage and especially parenthood. In Sejong, a city designated to be South Korea’s new administrative capital, about 30 single men and women attended their latest event in June. The office’s goal was to encourage working single men and women to take part in “recreational activities and table talks.”

South Korea’s President Moon Jae-in launched a committee in December 2017 to tackle the country’s low birth rate, called the Presidential Committee on Aging Society and Population Policy.

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No. of births in S. Korea falls to 26,100 in April: Statistics Korea

4월 출생아 최소 기록 37개월째...인구이동도 감소

South Korea's birthrate fell again in April,... marking its lowest-ever level amid a decreasing number of marriages.
The country's statistics agency also said migration within the country declined in May.
Yoon Jung-min has details.
The number of newborns per month hit its lowest level on record in April amid concerns about Korea's shrinking population.
According to data by Statistics Korea on Wednesday, the number of births declined 6-point-1 percent on-year to 26-thousand-1-hundred in April. The numbers were the lowest since the data was first compiled in 1981.
The statistics agency said the birth rate has continued to fall mainly because fewer people are getting married. There were 20-thousand marriages in April, down 2-point-9 percent from the previous year.
The main reason for falling childbirths in April is because the number of females aged from 30 to 34, who are the group most capable of childbearing, has decreased 3-point-3 percent on-year,... and the number of marriages has fallen for seven years in a row.
Meanwhile, in another report by the agency on the same day, some 569-thousand people moved to other regions or cities within the country in May. That's down 5-point-1 percent from a year earlier, and the lowest figure since October 2018.
Gyeonggi-do Province, Sejong City and the southern island of Jeju saw an increase in population,...while 11 other regions or cities lost population, including Seoul and Busan.
Yoon Jung-min, Arirang News.

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