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Station Tour: Zarya and Zvezda

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Station Tour: Zarya and Zvezda

Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams concludes her tour of the International Space Station with a visit to the Russian segment, which includes Zarya, the first segment of the station launched in 1998, and Zvezda, the central command post. She also takes a look at the Poisk and Rassvet modules where Soyuz spacecraft are docked.

Harmony, Tranquility, Unity:


Destiny, Columbus, Kibo:


Cupola and Leonardo:
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Station Tour: Harmony, Tranquility, Unity

Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams starts off her tour of the International Space Station with a look at its nodes -- Harmony, Tranquility and Unity -- which include the crew's sleeping quarters and hygiene station.

Destiny, Columbus, Kibo:


Cupola and Leonardo:


Zarya and Zvezda:
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Station Tour: Destiny, Columbus, Kibo

Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams continues the International Space Station tour with a look at the Destiny, Kibo and Columbus laboratory modules as well as the Quest airlock.

Harmony, Tranquility, Unity:


Cupola and Leonardo:


Zarya and Zvezda:
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Station Tour: Cupola and Leonardo

Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams continues the tour of the International Space Station with a look at the station's observation deck, known as the cupola, as well as the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device in the Tranquility node, before heading into the Leonardo Permanent Multi-Purpose Module.

Harmony, Tranquility, Unity:


Destiny, Columbus, Kibo:


Zarya and Zvezda:
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Sunita Suni Williams' Space Station Tour (most complete version)

There are basically two versions of Suni Williams' ISS tour on Youtube, but each leaves out some things the other includes. So i have cut and pasted a video that has everything available.

ISS Tour: Russian Segment & Soyuz Spacecraft | Video

Expedition 33 commander Suni Williams showcases the oldest segment (Zarya) on the ISS , the central command post (Zvezda) and takes a look inside spaceship that will take her home.

Station Tour: Harmony, Tranquility, Unity

Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams starts off her tour of the International Space Station with a look at its nodes -- Harmony, Tranquility and Unity -- which include the crew's sleeping quarters and hygiene station.

Expedition 32/33 Launches to the International Space Station

Expedition 32/33 Soyuz Commander Yuri Malenchenko, NASA Flight Engineer Suni Williams and Flight Engineer Aki Hoshide of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency launched on the Russian Soyuz TMA-05M spacecraft on July 15 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to begin a two-day journey to the International Space Station. The trio will dock to the station July 17 to start a four month tour, joining station Commander Gennady Padalka, NASA Flight Engineer Joe Acaba and Russian Flight Engineer Sergei Revin, who have been on the outpost since mid-May. The launch took place on the 37th anniversary of the launching of the historic Apollo-Soyuz mission in 1975 that resulted in the first docking of U.S. and Russian spacecraft and marked the start of the partnership that spawned the International Space Station.

Life on Station

B-roll of life aboard the International Space Station. Image credit: Courtesy NASA

HD download link:

Station Tour: Cupola and Leonardo

Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams continues the tour of the International Space Station with a look at the station's observation deck, the cupola, as well as the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device in the Tranquility node, before heading into the Leonardo Permanent Multi-Purpose Module.
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Soyuz undocking, reentry and landing explained

How does an astronaut return to Earth from the International Space Station? What does it feel like to re-enter the atmosphere? How does the Soyuz capsule function? Watch and find out. This video is based on an actual lesson delivered to the ESA astronaut class of 2009 (also known as the #Shenanigans09) during their ESA Basic Training. It features interviews with astronauts who have flown on the Soyuz and dramatic footage of actual landings.

Produced by the ESA Human Spaceflight and Operations (HSO) Astronaut Training Division, Cologne, Germany, in collaboration with the HSO Strategic Planning and Outreach Office, Noordwijk, The Netherlands, with special support from Roskosmos.

Narration Voice: Bernard Oattes

Technical Experts: Stephane Ghiste, Dmitriy Churkin (HSO-UT)

Content Design: Stephane Ghiste, Dmitriy Churkin, Raffaele Castellano, Matthew Day (HSO-UT)

Animation & Video Editing: Raffaele Castellano (HSO-UT), HSO-K

Project Coordination: Matthew Day, Stephane Ghiste, Dmitriy Churkin (HSO-UT)

Special thanks to:
Martin Schweiger (Orbiter software:
Nikita Vtyurin, Andrew Thielmann (Orbiter Soyuz model)
Lionel Ferra (HSO-UT)
Oleg Polovnikov (HSO-UT)
Frank De Winne (HSO-A)
Paolo Nespoli (HSO-A)
Antonio Rodenas Bosque (HSO-UT)
NASA
ROSCOSMOS
S.P. Korolev Rocket and Space Corporation Energia
Aerospace Search and Rescue Service of the Russian Federation

Parachute footage: Cambridge University Spaceflight

Surfer footage: copyright Red Bull Media House

Footage from inside Soyuz capsule courtesy of RSC Energia has limited rights:

a) These data are submitted with Limited Rights under Agreement among the Government of Canada, Governments of Member States of the European Space Agency, the Government of Japan, the Government of the Russian Federation and the Government of the United States of America concerning co-operation on the civil International Space Station.

These data may be used by the receiving co-operating agency and its contractors and subcontractors, provided that such data shall be used, duplicated or disclosed only for the following purposes, which are related to the Cooperating Agency Space Station Program for ISS:
1) Use for ESA astronaut training
2) Use for educational purposes
These data shall not be used by persons or entities other than the receiving Cooperating Agency, its contractors or subcontractors, or for any other purposes, without the prior written permission of the furnishing partner state, acting through its cooperating agency.

b) This notice shall be marked on any reproduction of these data in whole or part.

Also watch:
Journey to the ISS Part 1: The launch sequence explained


Watch Part 2: Soyuz rendezvous and docking explained


Captions available in English, French, German, Italian, Russian, Romanian (with thanks to Alexa Mirel) and Spanish. Click on the CC button to switch between languages.

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Station Tour: Russian Segment

Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams concludes her tour of the International Space Station with a visit to the Russian segment, which includes Zarya, the first segment of the station launched in 1998, and Zvezda, the central command post. She also takes a look at the Poisk and Rassvet modules where Soyuz spacecraft are docked.

ISS Tour: Kitchen, Bedrooms & The Latrine | Video

Expedition 33 commander Suni Williams showcase the sleeping accomodations, how the bathroom is utilized, brushing teeth in microgravity and the common room with food. Harmony, Tranquility and Unity are the nodes toured.

Expedition 59 Crew Lands Safely in Kazakhstan

Expedition 59 Commander Oleg Kononenko of Roscosmos and Flight Engineers Anne McClain of NASA and David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency landed safely near the town of Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan June 24, U.S. time, after bidding farewell to their colleagues on the complex and undocking their Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft from the Poisk Module on the International Space Station. The trio spent more than six months in space conducting research and operational work in support of the station.

Horizons mission - Soyuz: launch to orbit

This unique video shows a full launch of the Soyuz MS-09: from liftoff to orbit.

Watch the launch from inside the crew capsule with first-ever shots from outside the spacecraft recorded by cameras fixed to the exterior of the Soyuz.

The intense launch lasts less than ten minutes whereby the Soyuz spacecraft is propelled 1640 km and gains 210 km altitude. Every second for nine minutes, the spacecraft accelerates 50 km/h on average as the rocket’s boosters burn their fuel and are discarded.
See the astronaut’s reactions and what the spacecraft looks like as the main steps are carried out to get into orbit:

-00:12 Launch command issued
-00:10 Engine turbopumps at flight speed
-00:05 Engines at maximum thrust
00:00 Launch
+1:54 Separation of emergency rescue system
+1:57 First stage separation
+2:38 Fairing separation
+4:48 Second stage separation
+4:58 Tail adapter separation
+8:45 Third stage engine cut off having arrived in orbit
+8:49 Soyuz separation, deploy solar arrays and antennae

The astronauts, from left to right, are NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor, Roscosmos commander Sergei Prokopyev and ESA astronaut and flight engineer Alexander Gerst launched in the Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to the International Space Station on 6 June 2018. ESA astronaut Matthias Maurer and ESA television host Richard Hollingham provide commentary taken from the live event.

Hunched in their Sokol flight suits that offer protection in case of fire or depressurisation, the trio stay in the crew capsule of the Soyuz – the only module that is also designed to survive a return to Earth. The bags above their heads contain supplies for the International Space Station as every bit of space is used.

During a Soyuz launch astronauts typically experience forces of up to 4g – having to work while being pressed into their seats with a force that is four times more than the gravity felt on Earth. The Soyuz commander uses a stick to press buttons as they are too far away from the control panel.

The fluffy toys above the astronauts’ heads are mascots and good luck charms but also serve as a simple but effective test to see when the spacecraft is in orbit: when they start to float the spacecraft is weightless and orbiting Earth. Above Sergei is the mascot for the 2018 FIFA soccer World Cup held in Russia. Alexander took German children television icon “Die Maus” with him.

The launch went as planned as the 50-m tall Soyuz rocket propelled the astronauts to their cruising speed of around 28 800 km/h.
For this launch the astronauts took 34 orbits of Earth over two days to arrive at their destination spending their time in the cramped orbital module of the Soyuz that is no larger than a car. With limited communications and living space the astronauts had time to adapt to weightlessness and reflect on their mission ahead. They aligned their spacecraft with the International Space Station and approached the orbital outpost for docking on 8 June 2018. The files for this video were downloaded by the astronauts after arriving at the Space Station.

Alexander is a returning visitor to the International Space Station, the first of ESA’s 2009 class of astronauts to be sent into space for a second time. During the second part of his mission Alexander will take over as commander of the International Space Station, only the second time an ESA astronaut will take on this role so far.

Credits: ESA / NASA / Roscosmos

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Station Tour: Zarya and Zvezda

International Space Station - Episode 4 - Zvezda

In this episode the third module, the Russian Zvezda, is launched by a Proton Rocket and docks with the ISS.

Music: Breathing Planet - Doug Maxwell

You can support the channel at -

Animations: Kerbal Space Program 1.1.3

Mods:
Space Shuttle System -

ISS Community -

Cx Aerospace -

Real Solar System -

Realism Overhaul -

RSSVE -

ISS Tour E01 - Zvezda

Il primo episodio del tour alla scoperta dei vari moduli della Stazione Spaziale Internazionale, con il commento di Veronica Remondini.

Kerbal Space Program/RO - ISS Assembly 01 - Zarya, Unity, Zvezda

I make my first attempt at realistically building the International Space Station in Kerbal Space Program. Things don't exactly go the way they're supposed to.

Thanks to SQUAD for making this marvelous game, which you can get at Also thanks to all the other KSP players on YouTube and Twitch who gave me the inspiration to do these videos in the first place.

The ZVEZDA module: The ‘star’ of the Russian side of the International Space Station | SpaceByte

While today the International Space Station has more than a dozen habitable modules, one in particular has been the heart of the entire complex for two decades — the Russian Zvezda module.

WATCH NEXT:
UNITY: The start of ISS assembly | SpaceByte
ZARYA: The dawn of the ISS | SpaceByte
SPACEX CREW DRAGON: Launching America into space! | SpaceByte

Launched on July 12, 2000, from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, the third module to be added to the ISS docked to the fledgling outpost two weeks later.

Zvezda, which means “star” in Russian, is 13.1 meters long and 4.35 meters wide. It’s solar panel wingspan is 29.7 meters. Overall, the module has a mass of more than 20,000 kilograms with a pressurized volume of 75 cubic meters.

The module has several sections: A transfer compartment with three docking ports, a main body called the working compartment, a aft transfer chamber with a docking port and an unpressurized assembly section that includes a variety of external equipment.

Despite nearly two years of delays, it’s launch in 2000 was a critical point in the history of the ISS as its arrival was crucial to the long-term operation of the ISS as well as the success of U.S.-Russian and international collaboration on the project.

#Zvezda #SpaceStation20th #OrbitalVelocity

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A HUMAN SPACEFLIGHT ODYSSEY
Orbital Velocity aims to offer casual observers and devoted space enthusiasts alike the best media chronicling humanity’s journey toward becoming a multiplanetary species by providing informative, digestible and accurate content.

The story of human expansion into low-Earth orbit and beyond is happening right before our eyes. Starting with the International Space Station, the mission of Orbital Velocity is to act as a “living time capsule” chronicling these ambitions to live and work off the planet.

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