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The Human Microbiome: A New Frontier in Health

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The Human Microbiome: A New Frontier in Health

Microbiome expands the genetic and functional capacity of its human host. Susan Lynch explains that human microbiome develops early in life and that gut microbes shape immune function and relate to disease outcomes in childhood. She also explores next-generation microbiome therapeutics and research. Recorded on 11/07/2019. [12/2019] [Show ID: 35240]

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UCTV is the broadcast and online media platform of the University of California, featuring programming from its ten campuses, three national labs and affiliated research institutions. UCTV explores a broad spectrum of subjects for a general audience, including science, health and medicine, public affairs, humanities, arts and music, business, education, and agriculture. Launched in January 2000, UCTV embraces the core missions of the University of California -- teaching, research, and public service – by providing quality, in-depth television far beyond the campus borders to inquisitive viewers around the world.
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The Microbiome: A New Frontier in Human Health

Traditionally the medical community has viewed microbes as the cause of illness and sought to eliminate them. This notion, however, is shifting as emerging research in the field of human microbiome research has revealed the presence of diverse microorganisms living on and within the human body. These complex microbial communities develop during infancy and produce a range of essential functions necessary for maintenance of human health. Susan Lynch, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Director Colitis and Crohn's Disease Microbiome Research Core, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, discusses the genesis, influences on and effects of the human microbiome, with a particular focus on childhood allergic disease and asthma.

The Center for Genetic Medicine Silverstein Lecture Series was established by the Herman M. and Bea L. Silverstein Medical Research Fund for Genetic Medicine to bring advances in genetics research and medicine to the general public.
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Microbiome: a New Frontier That Might Just Affect Everything

Prof. George Weinstock - Evnin Family Chair and Director of Microbial Genomics, Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, USA

Life in Extreme Conditions - A Lesson from Nature
Second global scientific summit
Dead Sea Research Institute
Porter Foundation
Center for Regional Thinking
Dead Sea Land
Tel Aviv University
March 11-13, 2019
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Diet, Shaping Our Microbiome

Microbiome expands the genetic and functional capacity of its human host. Susan Lynch explores how the gut microbiome responds differently to a plant based diet and to an animal based diet. Watch the Entire Talk Here: [8/2020] [Show ID: 36151]

Please Note: Knowledge about health and medicine is constantly evolving. This information may become out of date.

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UCTV features the latest in health and medicine from University of California medical schools. Find the information you need on cancer, transplantation, obesity, disease and much more.

UCTV is the broadcast and online media platform of the University of California, featuring programming from its ten campuses, three national labs and affiliated research institutions. UCTV explores a broad spectrum of subjects for a general audience, including science, health and medicine, public affairs, humanities, arts and music, business, education, and agriculture. Launched in January 2000, UCTV embraces the core missions of the University of California -- teaching, research, and public service – by providing quality, in-depth television far beyond the campus borders to inquisitive viewers around the world.
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The Human Microbiome - A New Frontier in Drug Discovery

There is a new phenomenon sweeping the globe (or at least sweeping the imagination of people around the globe). It is the human gut microbiome and the role it may play in the future of human health.

Recent reports have indicated that the human gut microbiome may be implicated in a whole variety of health conditions such as metabolism, obesity, diabetes, immunity and autism. If you can name it, there has probably been something written about the condition and the gut microbiome.

One thing is for certain and that is that the gut microbiome has a role in protecting the human host from disease.

Original article by Lee Jones, who is the Founder, President and CEO of Rebiotix

If you'd like to view the original article then follow the link below:



You can also download the original article pdf here:



For more information on Drug Discovery World, head to:

Human Microbiome: A New Frontier in Health (So New-Science Is Starting Over) Why Spike Helpful News?

Human Microbiome: A New Frontier in Health (So New-Science Is Starting Over) Why Spike Helpful News?
The stones are crying out. You are alive on a MATRIX. You are not ALONE. You are not an UNBELIEVER. You are only unpersuaded.
It is my duty to use facts. The facts should be only judged by standards accepted: Using legal, scientific, mathematical facts (base 9, base 10, base 20, fractal, etc. but no Quantum Physics without proof and no round numbers, that's final God did not use round numbers.) or Logic.
I can prove by facts the following:
All elements are grown on a MATRIX.
Money has no intrinsic value including gold and silver.
Giants were a fact as taught in the Holy Scripture and legend of the past.
The tunnels found in the mountains along with every cave system is fossilized remains of Giants.
Humans are related to giants through DNA.
We are living in the post apocalyptic era and we are walking on the bones of our ancestors because the fossils of our ancestors are the stones we walk on everyday.
The CHINA CAVE GROTTOS are not Megaliths, they are giants.
The NEW ENGLAND ROCK WALLS are the outline of giant fossilized people.
The MAYAN TEACH NOTHING ABOUT ALIENS.
The same people who covered up the Flat Earth are mining the MATRIX in a way destroying the planet.
Yes, it's the ILLUMINATI, and it all goes back to anti-Christ Rome.
12-11-2019: I learned last the Roman Church is a recent invention to give thier evil actions today credibility; the real power is the Rosicrucian's and the Witchcraft they use in spell casting. Sad but true, the deep things of Satan are deep indeed.
Alan Hughes, Uncompahgre Plateau, same as above date 12-11-2019 (2:55 mt)
This is the Truth as I see things now and welcome all Biblical debate. I will change as guided by Scripture alone. (Please, no Enoch, Esdras, and Gospel of Mary Magdalene.)

The human microbiome is the next frontier

We depend on our natural production of digestive enzymes and those produced by the microbes in our intestines to help with the breakdown of foods. These enzymes target a variety of carbohydrates, some fibers, as well as various fats and proteins.

Understanding the Human Microbiome and its Therapeutic Potential

A Mount Sinai Morningside and Mount Sinai West Department of Medicine Grand Rounds presented by Louis J. Cohen, MD, MS, Assistant Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology)

The Human Microbiome Project - Lita Proctor

February 12, 2018 - National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research (Open Session). More:

The Human Microbiome - Sean Conlan

Sean Conlan, Ph.D., is an associate investigator in the Microbial Genomics Section (MGS) of the Translational and Functional Genomics Branch at the National Human Genome Research Institute. Dr. Conlan works closely with the NIH Intramural Sequencing Center to process, analyze and publicly deposit sequencing data associated with MGS projects. He also does basic research on the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, plasmid biology and molecular epidemiology of hospital associated pathogens.

The NHGRI Short Course in Genomics offers science educators the opportunity to hear lectures and receive teaching resources from leading researchers, clinicians and staff. Topics include complex diseases, sequencing technologies, brain and behavior, bioinformatics, gene editing, the human microbiome and ethical issues in genomics research. More:
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The Microbiome: An Important Frontier in Health & Medicine

What do we know about the human microbiome? | Brian Beck | TEDxStCloud

Excited by the rapid advances in the field of microbiology, Brian Beck nonetheless advises that we mix caution with our curiosity as we consider emerging products and services related to our human microbiome. Brian Beck is the Vice President of Research and Development for Microbiologics and has led the organization's molecular products and services division since 2013. Brian earned his Ph.D. in Bacteriology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and completed research appointments at the University of Minnesota and the University of Michigan. He is fascinated by the translation of scientific knowledge into applications that improve and environment and our lives. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at

The human microbiome and what we do to it

Did you know that you and I are only 1% human — we've 90 trillion cells which don't belong to us. Yes we are more bacteria than human.
Have you ever wondered what it means to be human? It turns out that only a tiny percentage of what you and I are made of is actually human — and we need our non-human bits to survive. This part of us now has a name — it's called our microbiome. But we're doing dreadful things to this hidden majority and it's damaging our health as a result. From the Tonic series produced with the assistance of NPS.

For more information visit:

Microbiome: friend and foe

Microbiome: friend and foe

Air date: Wednesday, April 3, 2019, 3:00:00 PM

Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures

Runtime: 01:06:06

Description: NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

Annual G. Burroughs Mider Lecture

The Segre laboratory studies and understands health with the perspective that humans coexist with billions of microbiota in our guts and on our skin. It is increasingly clear that possible pathogens flourish and compete within a larger microbial community of endogenous bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Dr. Segre has been a part of the larger NIH Human Microbiome Project that developed methodologies to characterize microbial communities with genomic sequencing and analysis, offering major advantages over traditional culture-based studies. Dr. Segre's laboratory research addresses two major areas of clinical microbial genomics: foundational studies of the human skin microbiome and the tracking of hospital-associated bacterial pathogens. These studies have only been possible because of integrated collaborations with colleagues in NIAMS, NIAID, the NIH Clinical Center, and the NIH Intramural Sequencing Center. Together, these groups performed the first skin-microbiome survey, which characterized the diversity of microbes that live on normal volunteers, and determined that humans are ecosystems with niche-dependent bacterial populations (dry, moist, or oily regions). The researchers are extending these studies to patient populations with atopic dermatitis (eczema) and primary immune deficiencies. The group's expertise in microbial genomic sequencing has grown to include significant efforts to understand hospital-acquired infections, particularly outbreaks of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacterial infections.

The Annual G. Burroughs Mider Lecture, established in 1968, recognizes an NIH intramural scientist’s outstanding contributions to biomedical research and honors G. Burroughs Mider, the first director of NIH laboratories and clinics.

For more information go to

Julie Segre, Ph.D., Chief, Translational and Functional Genomics Branch; Senior Investigator, Microbial Genomics Section, National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH

Permanent link:

Introducing the Human Gut Microbiota

In this presentation for health care professionals, Dr. Karen Madsen discusses how gut microbes may potentially influence human health and the different ways in which microbes and the host interact with each other.
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Harnessing the microbiome to prevent and treat disease

Learn how our microbiome, the millions of bacteria from hundreds of bacterial strains that live in our body’s digestive system, can play a critical role in our health and well-being. Dr. Fischbach explained how our diets can shape the microbiome for better and for worse, how chemical byproducts of the microbiome can defend against disease, and what our microbial ecosystem says about our overall health. What really happens in your gut when you eat different types of foods? What molecules and chemicals are created and how do they impact your risk for illness? The answers to these questions may hold the key to preventing and treating cancer and other deadly diseases.

Michael Fischbach, PhD
Associate Professor of Bioengineering and of Medicine (Microbiology and Immunology)

Part of Health Matters 2021, Stanford Medicine's free virtual community event that ran May 10-15. Learn more at healthmatters.stanford.edu. #healthmatters2021

Wonders of the Microbiome: Improving Your Immune System Through Your Gut

There is a great deal of research on the importance of microbiomes and maintaining a healthy balance of “good” bacteria in the gut has been linked to cancer prevention, reduction in obesity, and decreased anxiety and depression. While drinking kombucha won’t keep you from getting infected with viruses, it may help with improving your overall wellness, including bolstering your immune response. Lisa Kiser, DNP, NCM, WHNP, explores what exactly our microbiome is, how it contributes to our health, and why researchers are looking at probiotics as a part of the response to COVID 19.

Dr. Lisa Kiser, a certified nurse-midwife and women’s health nurse practitioner, discusses the role of prebiotics and probiotics in promoting a healthy microbiome and this contributes to overall health and wellness. A native of Tucson, Arizona, she has participated in the natural foods movement for over thirty-five years and incorporates a healthy, whole-foods diet into her work.


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Human Microbiome Project: Analyzing microbes that play a role in health and disease

February 4th, 2012 - Curtis Huttenhower, assistant professor of computational biology and bioinformatics, talks about the Human Microbiome Project and the role that microbes—organisms like bacteria, viruses, and fungi that live in the stomach, in the mouth, on the skin, or elsewhere—play in normal bodily functions, like development or immunity, as well as in disease.

The Human Microbiome | Illumina Webinar

In this recorded webinar, Professor Saheer Gharbia, Head of the Genomics Research Unit at the National Infection Service in the UK, discusses recent research findings on her studies of the human microbiome.


A global genomics leader, Illumina provides comprehensive next-generation sequencing solutions to the research, clinical, and applied markets. Illumina technology is responsible for generating more than 90% of the world’s sequencing data.* Through collaborative innovation, Illumina is fueling groundbreaking advancements in oncology, reproductive health, genetic disease, microbiology, agriculture, forensic science, and beyond.

*Data calculations on file. Illumina, Inc., 2015.

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Dr. Versalovic on the human microbiome project

Dr. James Versalovic, professor of pathology & immunology, pediatrics, molecular and human genetics, molecular virology and microbiology and director of the Texas Children's Microbiome Center, talks about the project. Learn more about the project at

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