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The Road to Hell? Intentions, Uncertainty and the Origins of World War I, Dr. Sebastian Rosato

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"The Road to Hell? Intentions, Uncertainty and the Origins of World War I," Dr. Sebastian Rosato

A century after the outbreak of World War I, there is still little consensus on its causes. The lessons learned are of particular importance for the United States and the world today. University of Notre Dame Professor Sebastian Rosato specializes in the theory and history of great power politics and will question established explanations and develop new arguments about the causes of the Great War.

The event is part of the Hesburgh Lecture Series and is presented in partnership with the Notre Dame Club of Kansas City.

Recorded April 19, 2015 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit
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The Origins of the Second World War

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New Thinking on the Origins of World War I

This summer marks the centennial of the outbreak of World War I, perhaps the most transformative war in history. While the wars of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic wars harnessed national populations to the war effort in a way not previously seen since the emergence of the modern states system, WWI combined the mobilization of both populations and industrial power, enhanced by technology, to produce a most lethal form of warfare. WWI also redrew the map of Europe and created the modern Middle East, as it led to the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Russian Empire, and the Ottoman Empire, thereby unleashing nationalism the disruptive characteristics of which still plague us today. It also paved the way for the great ideological conflicts of the 20th century by unleashing the forces of state-based communism and fascism. To commemorate the outbreak of The Great War, FPRI and ROA will present a workshop offering presentations by three eminent scholars of the war. Michael Neiberg of the US Army War College will discuss the factors that led to the outbreak of the war. John Schindler of the US Naval War College will discuss the often overlooked role of Austria-Hungary in the war and the Eastern and Italian fronts. Kate Epstein of Rutgers University-Camden will discuss the role of pre-war British defense policy in the outbreak of the conflict. Mac Owens, editor of Orbis and professor at the Naval War College, will moderate the panel.
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DePue Origins of WWI

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The Origins and Effects of Trench Stalemate - Nicholas Murray

Nicholas Murray, U.S. Naval War College

This presentation will explain what caused the stalemate, why trenches posed such a particularly difficult problem, what the knock on effects in terms of society and the home front were, and how the warring parties attempted to deal with the issue

Lecture presented during the 15th Annual Truman Library Teachers' Conference at the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

13. The Origins of World War I

France Since 1871 (HIST 276)

The traditional, diplomatic history of World War I is helpful in understanding how a series of hitherto improbable alliances come to be formed in the early years of the twentieth century. In the case of France and Russia, this involves a significant ideological compromise. Along with the history of imperial machinations, however, World War I should be understood in the context of the popular imagination and the growth of nationalist sentiment in Europe.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Tangled Maps of Empire: Diplomatic Origins of the First World War
07:24 - Chapter 2. A Delicate Balances: The Shifting Alliances of the Great Powers
19:26 - Chapter 3. The British Empire on the World Stage: Capabilities on the Continent
32:29 - Chapter 4. Mounting Tensions in Alsace-Lorraine: The Saverne Crisis
40:14 - Chapter 5. War Expectations and Enthusiasm

Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website:

This course was recorded in Fall 2007.

"The Marne, 1914," Dr. Holger Herwig

The First Battle of the Marne was the battle that halted the advance of the German Army across northern France in the fall of 1914. With the advance halted the German and Allied armies dug in to hold their ground, thus setting the stage for the bloody stalemate that would exist for the near entirety of World War I on the Western Front.

Dr. Holger Herwig, professor and Canada Research Chair in Military and Strategic Studies at the University of Calgary, discusses the development of, the key individuals involved, and the attitudes surrounding the battle he argues to be the most decisive land battle since Waterloo.

Recorded November 10, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Christopher Clark, France and the Origins of the Great War

H-France Salon, Volume 6, Issue 13
Society for French Historical Studies
Plenary Session
26 April 2014

The Path to War: How the First World War Created Modern America - Michael Neiberg

Michael Neiberg, US Army War College

The First World War transformed the United States into a financial powerhouse and global player, despite the reassertion of isolationism in the years that followed. Examining the social, political, and financial forces at work as well as the role of public opinion and popular culture, The Path to War offers both a compelling narrative and the inescapable conclusion that World War One was no parenthetical exception in the American story but a moment of national self-determination.

Lecture presented during the 15th Annual Truman Library Teachers' Conference at the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum

For more information visit

"Paris, 1919: Six Months That Changed the World," Dr. Margaret MacMillan

Dr. Margaret MacMillan, historian and author of Paris, 1919: Six Months That Changed the World, discusses the Paris Peace Conference, the significance of the decisions made in Paris, and how the those decisions continue to affect the world today.

Recorded May 25, 2007 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit
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"1915 -- An Ecstasy of Fumbling," Lt. Col. (Ret.) Dr. Richard Faulkner

Noted educator and Society for Military History Distinguished Book Prize winner, Lt. Col. (ret.) Richard S. Faulkner from the Command and General Staff College presents, 1915 -- An Ecstasy of Fumbling.

The presentation focuses on how the deadly stalemate developed at the end of 1914 and the various efforts armies made in 1915 to break the deadlock and grasp victory.

This program is part of the Lyric Opera Guild’s award-winning series, At Ease With Opera.

Recorded February 2, 2015 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

France’s Planning & Fighting the First Months of WWI, Brigadier General Dr. Robert Doughty

Brigadier General Robert Doughty retired in July 2005 after 40 years of service in the U.S. Army. He graduated from the U.S. Military Academy in 1965 and received his PhD from Kansas University in 1979. He served in a variety of assignments in the United States, Europe, and Vietnam, and his awards and decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal, Silver Star, and Combat Infantry Badge. He served as the Head of the Department of History at the U.S. Military Academy from 1985 until 2005.

Doughty makes a point that rarely in military history has a commander or an army made so many mistakes and escaped defeat than in the case of the French and General Joffre prior to and during the opening months of World War I. Doughty highlights the numerous mistakes made by the French military command in planning for the war and by General Joffre in analyzing and confronting the German threat during the first months of the war.

Presented November 7, 2014 as part of the National World War I Museum and United States World War I Centennial Commission 2014 Symposium, 1914: Global War & American Neutrality.

The Symposium was held in association with The Western Front Association East Coast Branch and the World War I Historical Association. Sponsored by Colonel J's, the Neighborhood Tourist Development Fund and Verlag Militaria.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Emergence of Americas I

Intro Video explaining how this HL component will work. Nothing to copy in this lecture, just a very basic review of necessary American history to understand up to this point. If you are going to skip this one, pay attention to the last slide on the Monroe Doctrine as it will be important for future lectures.

The Great WWI Controversy: Who Was to Blame? A Panel Discussion on the Centennial

The origins of the First World War have aroused deep controversy for decades. On the centennial of the war, there is renewed interest in revisiting its origins. Was Germany to blame? Did Europe’s statesmen sleepwalk to war? In this panel discussion, leading historians and IR experts will weigh in on the debate and offer lessons for avoiding another great power conflict.

Graham Allison: Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School
Peter Gourevitch: Professor of Political Science, University of California, San Diego
Charles S. Maier: Leverett Saltonstall Professor of History, Harvard University
Thomas Weber: Professor of History and International Affairs, University of Aberdeen; Visiting Scholar, CES
Chaired by: Alison Frank Johnson: Professor of History, Harvard University

Monday, Nov 24th, 2014

Dr Michael S Neiberg WW1 Symposium USAHEC 20170513

America's Responses to the War in Europe, 1914-1917, Dr. Michael S. Neiberg
Recorded 13 MAY 2017 at the World War One History Symposium at the United States Army Heritage and Education Center, Carlisle, PA.

MICHAEL S. NEIBERG is the inaugural Chair of War Studies in the Department of National Security and Strategy at the United States Army War College. His published work specializes on the First and Second World Wars, notably the American and French experiences. His most recent book on the First World War is Dance of the Furies: Europe and the Outbreak of World War I (Harvard University Press, 2011). The Wall Street Journal recently named it one of the five best books ever written about the war. In October, 2012 Basic Books published his The Blood of Free Men, a history of the liberation of Paris in 1944. In May, 2015 Basic published his Potsdam: The End of World War II and the Remaking of Europe. In October, Oxford University Press published his Path to War, a history of American responses to the Great War, 1914-1917.
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"The Profit Motive as Cause of the Great War: What's the Evidence?" Dr. Richard Hamilton

Dr. Richard Hamilton, historian and author of such books as The Origins of World War I, reviews the decision-making in Austria-Hungary, Germany, and Great Britain on the eve of the Great War and discusses how this evidence contradicts Marxist arguments about the causes of the war.

Presented at the World War I Historical Association Symposium, The Coming of the Great War, November 8-9, 2013.

Recorded November 8, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

If You Are In Favor of the Kaiser Keep it to Yourself, Dr. Michael Neiberg

Michael Neiberg is a Professor of History in the Department of National Security and Strategy at the United States Army War College in Carlisle, Pa.

Dr. Neiberg discusses the reactions of everyday Americans to the outbreak of World War I. He argues that such a bottom up approach provides a better understanding of what American views were and how they changed than the traditional top down view that American attitudes reflected those of President Woodrow Wilson.

Presented November 8, 2014 as part of the National World War I Museum and United States World War I Centennial Commission 2014 Symposium, 1914: Global War & American Neutrality.

The Symposium was held in association with The Western Front Association East Coast Branch and the World War I Historical Association. Sponsored by Colonel J's, the Neighborhood Tourist Development Fund and Verlag Militaria.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Verdun: The Bleeding of Nations - Richard S. Faulkner

Dr. Richard S. Faulkner joins The National World War I Museum and Memorial to discuss the Battle of Verdun

For more information regarding Then National World War I Museum and Memorial visit

"Tides, Tectonic Plates & Talismans All Over Again," Dr. Gary Armstrong

Dr. Gary Armstrong, Professor of Political Science at William Jewell College, describes and critiques the reemerging debate among political scientists over the causes of World War I, including the role of structural factors and the shift in the global balance of power.

Presented at the World War I Historical Association Symposium, The Coming of the Great War, November 8-9, 2013.

Recorded November 9, 2013 in J.C. Nichols Auditorium at the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.

For more information about the National WWI Museum and Memorial visit

Domination and Betrayal - WWI and the Modern World

The Great War signaled the terminal crisis of the European old regime–a crisis more than a century in the making. Pursuing the story of this crisis across themes of domination, integration and betrayal, UW History Professor Raymond Jonas considers the rivalries that underpinned the war and the bleak geopolitical thinking that informed them. Professor Jonas explores the political culture that obliterated tolerance for difference, finding the foundations of power in nation and race. Finally, he asks us to ponder the responsibilities of the powerful, viewed with the eyes of the young men they had persuaded to fight.

Raymond Jonas
UW Professor of History
11/5/14

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