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The Science Behind the Coronavirus, Series II

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The Science Behind the Coronavirus, Series II

In this second installment of our “The Science Behind the Coronavirus” series, Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong, the executive chairman of the Los Angeles Times, continues his examination of the ways the scientific community is taking up the battle against COVID-19.

Soon-Shiong (MD, MBBCh, MSc, FRCS (C), FACS) begins his presentation with a warning: The virus is continuing to mutate and is here to stay. But, Soon-Shiong adds, there is hope. Over an introduction and six parts, Soon-Shiong explains how scientists around the world are considering treating patients suffering from stages of COVID-19.

Finally, Soon-Shiong breaks down the medical concepts researchers are pondering as they search for a vaccine. Soon-Shiong is a surgeon and scientist who has spent his career studying the human immune system to fight cancer and infectious diseases. He is also the chairman and chief executive of NantWorks and the owner of or investor in a number of companies, including ImmunityBio and NantKwest, which are currently researching immunotherapies for COVID-19.

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The Science Behind the Coronavirus, Series I

Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong, the executive chairman of the Los Angeles Times, offers an overview of our special series, The Science Behind the Coronavirus. In this introduction, Soon-Shiong (MD, MBBCh, MSc, FRCS (C), FACS) proposes that understanding how the virus infects our bodies and strategies toward treatment can help us allay our anxiety about it. Soon-Shiong is a surgeon and scientist who has spent his career studying the human immune system to fight cancer and infectious diseases. He is also the chairman and CEO of NantWorks and the owner of or investor in a number of companies, including ImmunityBio and NantKwest which are currently researching immunotherapies for COVID-19.

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The Science Behind How the Body Clears Coronavirus | WSJ

Understanding how the body clears the new coronavirus is becoming more important as the U.S. begins to reopen. WSJ’s Daniela Hernandez explains how the body fights infection and why feeling better doesn’t equal being virus-free. Photo illustration: Laura Kammermann

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COVID-19: Vaccines, Testing, and the Science Behind the Cure

Join a panel of cutting-edge researchers to unpack the biology of viruses, learn how diagnostic tests work, and delve into what vaccines are and how they are being developed. The conversation will reveal how the science and social context, including racial inequities in health and healthcare, are inextricably linked as we work to stop the spread of COVID-19.

The program features Dr. Pardis Sabeti, a computational genomicist creating diagnostic tests for COVID-19, Dr. Kizzmekia Corbett, a viral immunologist and lead scientist on the vaccine development effort at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Vaccine Research Center, and Dr. Lynne Richardson, a physician and co-director of Mt. Sinai’s new Institute for Health Equity Research. The panel is moderated by science reporter and host of the Reset podcast Arielle Duhaime-Ross.

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The science behind the search for a COVID-19 vaccine: How do vaccines work?

The science behind the search for a COVID-19 vaccine:


Pursuit:


The innate immune system is our first response to an infection, like a virus, and involves our defense cells – white blood cells – quickly going on the attack. But it’s a generalised response and sometimes this isn’t enough to kill an infection. That is when we need our adaptive immune system to kick in an exquisitely specific response that precisely targets a virus.

Dr Vanessa Bryant from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research and University of Melbourne outlines how our new reality of COVID-19 vaccination could work.

Read the full story in Pursuit's special report - The science behind the search for a COVID-19 vaccine.

Introduction: The Science Behind the Coronavirus, Series II

Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong, the executive chairman of the Los Angeles Times, offers an overview of the second installment of our “The Science Behind the Coronavirus” series. This second series will examine why COVID-19 is a long-term threat to the global community and what scientists are doing to develop treatments and search for a vaccine.

Soon-Shiong is a surgeon and scientist who has spent his career studying the human immune system to fight cancer and infectious diseases. He is also the chairman and chief executive of NantWorks and the owner of or investor in a number of companies, including ImmunityBio and NantKwest, which are currently researching immunotherapies for COVID-19.

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Part 1: COVID-19 Is Here to Stay

SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the COVID-19 disease, has evolved, adapting and mutating as it travels across the globe. In Part 1 of this series, Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong, the executive chairman of the Los Angeles Times, explains how this evolution has ensured the survival of the coronavirus and made COVID-19 a long-term threat.

Soon-Shiong is a surgeon and scientist who has spent his career studying the human immune system to fight cancer and infectious diseases. He is also the chairman and chief executive of NantWorks and the owner of or investor in a number of companies, including ImmunityBio and NantKwest, which are currently researching immunotherapies for COVID-19.

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COVID-19: The Science Behind The Virus

What makes coronavirus different from other viruses? What do you understand about this health issue that’s affecting everyone around the world? Biologist, educator, and HMH author Michael DiSpezio explains to students the science behind viruses in general and the COVID-19 virus specifically, and why COVID-19 has become a worldwide health concern.

Disclaimer statement: The information posted here is not medical advice nor can it replace information from medical professionals. Instead, our goal is to provide you with some background about the science of viruses in general and the novel coronavirus in particular.

Science Behind Virus: Where is the epidemic going?

People hope the COVID-19 outbreak will come to an end as soon as possible. So what could be in store for the epidemic? We don't have a crystal ball to show us the future, but we can get some clues from the past.

Both SARS and the virus that caused COVID-19 are known as coronaviruses, so it might be helpful to compare the 2003 SARS outbreak with the current one. This might present us with the best-case scenario, where the virus is put under control through public health intervention.

The best way to contain the virus in both outbreaks is to identify cases as soon as possible and put the infected in isolation.

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The science behind viruses

The number of confirmed COVID-19 cases has risen to 59,000; the number of suspected cases stands at about 13,000. The death toll has jumped by over 200 - the highest in a single day - to more than 1,300. Meanwhile, over 6,000 people have recovered. The surge in confirmed cases is mainly due to a change in the criteria used to diagnose patients. Earlier, using nucleic acid testing kits was the only method to confirm coronavirus cases. Now, only in Hubei Province, a trained medical professional can classify a suspected case as a clinically confirmed case on the basis of chest imaging, rather than a laboratory test. CGTN's Tian Wei spoke with David Ho, director and CEO of Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center in New York City, on the fight against the coronavirus epidemic. Over the years, Ho has made many innovative state-of-the-art scientific contributions to understanding the technology behind HIV treatment.

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Science behind Coronavirus with Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong (Los Angeles Times Today - March 16, 2020)

I learned more about the coronavirus in these fascinating 23 minutes than anything I've seen or read so far. Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong clearly explains the science calmly and credibly in a way every layman can understand - he's a fascinating brilliant man. This program is informative, hopeful, and not alarming. I think you'll feel less anxious after watching it. The section on The Science of Soap at 18:30 is especially worth watching!

This special edition of Los Angeles Times Today aired on Spectrum cable March 16, 2020. I shortened the program to only feature Dr. Soon-Shiong.

••• The Los Angeles Times posted an extended version of Dr. Soon-Shiong's presentation on their YouTube channel:

From Wikipedia: Patrick Soon-Shiong is a South African-American surgeon, professor, inventor, and billionaire businessman. He is the inventor of the drug Abraxane, which became known for its efficacy against lung, breast, and pancreatic cancer. He is the sole owner of the Los Angeles Times newspaper.

The science behind reliable COVID-19 testing

Futuris looks at what scientists are doing to make sure coronavirus diagnostic tests are efficient and don’t produce false negatives.

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Science Behind Virus: How did the storm of fear hit us?

In the past two months, the world has been experiencing two epidemics at the same time – the COVID-19 epidemic and a fear epidemic. The disease is new, but the fear is not. What makes this outbreak scarier than it really is?

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How scientists are fighting the coronavirus: A three minute guide

Scientists across the world are working together to fight the novel coronavirus. Nature looks at three fields of research which are vital to keeping this outbreak under control: epidemiology, virology and biomedical science. Research in these areas will be key, alongside collaboration and the open sharing of data and results.

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The science behind how soap destroys coronavirus

Soap is made up of polar molecules – these are molecules where one end is different to the other end. In soap, one end loves water we call this hydrophilic whereas the other end hates water but loves fat we call this hydrophobic.
When you have greasy dishes - you use dishwashing soap to break up the fats on your plate which are then washed away with the water.
The same thing happens when you wash your hands with soap.
Coronavirus COVID19 is a special type of virus as it is sealed in a coating or an envelope called a lipid-bilayer. This is a fancy way of saying that coronavirus wears a double layered coat made of fat.
In this video we imagine a balloon is a virus particle. The confetti inside is the virus material – the balloon itself is the layer of fat around the outside.
The fat loving part of the soap molecule tries to burrow in the fat coat or lipid bilayer to get away from the water.
As it does this it tears a hole in the fat coat which punctures it and causes the insides of the virus to come out – destroying it.
The water then washes all of the bits of virus away and off your hands.
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Science Behind Virus: How to test for new coronavirus

The outbreak of the novel coronavirus in China this January saw people suffering from fever, cough, shortness of breath and even severe pneumonia. But these are only symptoms which could be caused by other diseases. How do we test for a virus that we haven't seen before?

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The Science Behind Masking

Remember the good old days before COVID-19? Going to concerts, hugging our grandparents, and wearing a top AND bottom to work? We miss it, too.

We all want life to go back to normal, and the best way YOU can help us do that is by wearing your mask.

We’re learning new things about masks all the time, but this is what we know now. We’re answering the most common questions about masks so that together, we can open Utah for good and put COVID-19 behind us. Comment below with the mask fact that surprised you and share this video so others can learn the science behind masking!

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The science behind reliable COVID-19 testing

Futuris looks at what scientists are doing to make sure coronavirus diagnostic tests are efficient and don’t produce false negatives.

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The science behind spikes in U.S. coronavirus infections

COVID-19 spreads virtually unchecked across the United States. The Johns Hopkins University tally showed almost 100,000 new cases over the weekend in the U.S., and the total confirmed cases surged to over three million. Florida has reported daily highs of 10,000 new cases. Arizona has seen record hospitalizations. Countless Americans joined festivities across the country. Health experts fear in five to seven days, there would be a new spike in cases. Donald Trump and Joe Biden have both made the pandemic a top campaign issue. And Trump's campaign team says it will hold another rally this week. That's despite criticism from health experts of previous re-election events, as some Trump staffers later tested positive for the virus. While many states are gradually re-opening their economy, it was a daunting challenge for some that opened too quickly. What's the public health prognosis in the U.S.? Earlier, Tian Wei talked to Eric Rubin, the editor in chief of the New England Journal of Medicine, who said a lack of leadership left states to fend for themselves.

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The Science Behind COVID-19 (Coronavirus 2019)

The coronavirus is widely misunderstood. In December 2019, a novel coronavirus was found to have developed in Wuhan, China. Dubbed the severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), this virus causes a disease that now has the world scrambling to find its cure: COVID-19, or the Coronavirus disease (2019).

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