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The marriage dilemma in China

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Gravitas: In China, there are no women to marry

China has the world's largest gender imbalance. Men in China are struggling to find brides. An NGO in China has proposed marrying 'leftover women' from urban areas with the 'surplus men' from rural areas. WION's Palki Sharma has the details.

#Gravitas #China #LeftoverWomen

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Banned practice of foot binding blighting China's oldest women | ITV News

Foot binding, the brutal tradition of breaking young girl's toes and reshaping the feet into a point, was stamped out in China over 60 years ago - but some of the counrty's oldest women still suffer today.

The practice dates back to the 10th century in China, when tiny feet were deemed a sign of beauty.

Those who did not have their feet bound were told they would never marry.

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The marriage dilemma in China

China is facing what’s being called the “Fourth Wave of Singledom”, brought on by economic development and the increased independence of the country’s women. This video takes a look at marriage pressure; the causes, the ways in which it manifests itself and the consequences as China's young generation attempt to escape the obligation to tie the knot and have to deal with the expectations of their parents.

Rediscovering China is a weekly show on CGTN that offers a unique insight into an aspect of life in China today. With its unrivaled access to the country's people and places, Rediscovering China brings you in-depth reports on the major issues facing China at a time of rapid change.

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Why in China marriage comes often with divorce | VPRO Documentary

In Chinese dreams, documentary maker and China expert Ruben Terlou travel further through China, driven by his fascination for the Chinese and with the rapidly changing society as a compass.

According to the Chinese dream of President Xi, the Chinese should marry and start a family. But with a surplus of men and an increasing number of divorces, the family as the cornerstone of society has not quite succeeded.

Ruben wonders how it is possible that almost five million marriages per year in China are blown up. He travels with a judge in the countryside, attends divorce cases in a court of law and sets off with a so-called mistress hunter. In a love hospital in the mega city of Shanghai he sees a relationship therapist in action.

Original title: Liefde in tijden van vooruitgang

Director and Sound: Jeroen de Greef
Presentation and Photography: Ruben Terlou
Camera: Peter Vancraesbeek & Joost van Herwijnen
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How Chinese marriage markets help parents find a love match for their child - BBC

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Reggie finishes his time in Chengdu with a visit to the marriage market in People’s Park, one of many such gatherings that across the country that now exist for parents to 'advertise' their sons and daughters as future marriage material. This phenomenon has become increasingly prevalent in the wake of the one-child policy and the preference for sons, which has now left China with an estimated 34 million more men than women.

Reggie in China | Episode 3 | BBC

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How Difficult Is It To Get Married In China? | ASIAN BOSS

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Why China and India face a marriage crisis | The Economist

China and India - home to a third of humanity – both face a marriage crisis that will last for generations. A mere five years ago marriage patterns were normal in the two countries.

Now in China 50m ‘guanggun’ – ‘bare branches’ – look doomed to bachelor-dom, while in India 500 year-old laws are being revised to allow men to marry out of caste, village and state.

What has lead to this marriage squeeze?

First, millions women have gone “missing”.

A generation ago, a preference for sons and the greater availability of prenatal screening meant first Chinese couples, then Indian ones, started aborting female fetuses and only giving birth to boys. At its extreme, in parts of Asia, more than 120 boys were being born for every 100 girls. Now, the generation with distorted sex ratios at birth is reaching marriageable age.
The result is that single men far outnumber women.
If China had had a normal sex ratio at birth, its female population in 2010 would have been 720m. In fact, it was only 655m, compared with almost 705m men and boys—50m surplus husbands.
Fertility rates then accentuate this distortion.
When a country’s fertility rate is going down (as in India) younger cohorts of people will tend to be smaller than older ones. If men are older than women at marriage, as they usually are, there will be fewer potential brides than husbands because women will have been born later, when fertility is lower.
Then there is a queuing effect. Men who cannot find a wife right away go on looking, and competing with younger men. As a result, the number of unmarried men piles up, as in a queue. By 2060, there could be more than 160 Chinese and Indian men wanting to marry for every 100 women.
This is a ferocious squeeze in countries where marriage has always been a basic requirement for being a full member of society. It could be hugely harmful. Almost everywhere, large numbers of single men are associated with high rates of crime and violence. No one really knows how these two giant countries will react.

China Doesn't Like That I'm a Single Woman, Here's Why | Op-Docs

“Sheng nu” (“leftover women”) is a term used to describe single women who are 27 or older in China. Most of these women live in cities and lead rewarding professional lives. The term was coined in 2007 by a government organization responsible for the protection and promotion of women’s rights and policies. That same year, the Ministry of Education added “sheng nu” to the official lexicon.

In this Op-Doc, based on the Independent Lens feature documentary “Leftover Women,” we follow one of those women — Qiu Huamei, contending with the stigma and social pressure forcing her to go on a grueling quest in search of a husband. She grew up in a small village five hours south of Beijing and is the second youngest of five sisters. Ms. Qiu is a successful lawyer, fluent in English and opinionated — but those qualities do not outweigh one key flaw: She is not married.

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【FULL】A Love For Dilemma EP01 | 小舍得 | iQiyi

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【Introduction】Nan Li is anxious about Huan Huan's decreasing grade, and she realizes the importance of a tuition class. Thus, Huan Huan faces a series of tough and excruciating tuition classes. The entire family revolves around Huan Huan entering high school. After a series of events, Nan Li and Xia Jun Shan finally realized their mistakes, and they plan to give their child a happy childhood.

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China's Leftover Men: Desperately Seeking Wives

He's 57 and has never been in a relationship. Now he's worried that his four nephews who live with him might end up alone - and desperate - just like him. How is China addressing its gender imbalance that has reached epic proportions?

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ALSO WATCH: Kidnapped Brides: The Vietnamese Women Sold As Wives In China


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Why Japan's Women Problem Is Hard to Fix

In an attempt to bring more workers into Japan's shrinking economy, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has outlined goals to create a Japan in Which Women Shine, also known as Womenomics. Bloomberg QuickTake explains why the government still faces serious deep rooted gender bias that excludes women from work.

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The Land Where Women Rule: Inside China's Last Matriarchy

China's one-child policy led to millions of female infanticides—except in a lush valley known as the “Land Where Women Rule.” Located in the foothills of the Himalayas, Lugu Lake is home to China’s Mosuo matriarchy. The region's 40,000 denizens have come up with a unique own family structure that puts women in charge. The Mosuo's “walking marriages”—in which women can have as many boyfriends as they want throughout their lifetime—replace traditional monogamy and inheritance passes from mother to daughter.

But are the women really in control—and how are men fairing under their rule? Broadly correspondent Milène Larsson spends a week in Lugu Lake with three generations of Mosuo women to find out what life is like in one of the world’s last matriarchies.

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SK-II: Marriage Market Takeover (Please turn on subtitle)

Watch how single women in China courageously #changedestiny by standing up against the pressure of being labelled “Sheng Nu”, or “leftover woman”. Learn more about SK-II’s #changedestiny movement:

Today, Chinese women face immense pressure to get married before they turn 27. In many Chinese cities, so called marriage markets are a common sight, where parents go to post and match personal ads. A number of brave Chinese women have finally stood up to speak their mind against society’s labels and their parents' pressures. A marriage market in Shanghai’s People’s park was taken over by personal messages from hundreds of independent women, stating that they want to control their own destiny.

Find out what these women courageously say to reconstruct the mutual respect between generations and increase society’s understanding to finally change their destiny in the film.

China's bachelor dilemma

Thu, May 2: Millions of Chinese men will never know the joys of matrimony. After decades of China's one-child policy and the selection abortion of girls, there's a surplus of males in the country. Paul Johnson explains. For more info, please go to

Female and over 30? China’s dating market may not want you

A 34-year-old Chinese woman conducted a social experiment to gauge attitudes to women’s age in China’s dating market. Wearing a hidden camera, she recorded prospective in-laws’ reactions when she revealed she was over 30.

One parent compared dating to the property market and told her: “You're a great house. But the thing is, it's in the countryside.”
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Interracial marriages on the rise in China

More than a million Chinese migrants now work and live on the African continent, while the number of Africans in China is thought to be around half that.

It’s a relationship that is not restricted just to trade.

Interracial marriages between Chinese and Africans are on the rise - from China's increasing investment in and trade with Africa has come an increase in migrants from Africa.

Al Jazeera's Adrian Brown reports from Liaoning, northeast China.

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China's Female Millionaires are in a Matchmaking Frenzy

Looking For Love: Despite China's massive gender gap, successful women in China struggle to get a date. A complex cocktail of cultural hangups has left a generation of men and women without partners and it's getting worse.

For similar stories, see:
The Dating Game - China

Romance China Style - China

Where Did A Million Chinese Millionaires Come From


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Marrying the right man is our biggest dream, one young Chinese girl's song goes. But while the cars and houses are coming easily to China's successful women, marrying their dream man isn't. Despite a gender gap of 118 men for every 100 women, China's conservative dictum is that a woman should not be too independent and that over 28 she's labelled 'leftover'. It means that most successful women struggle to get a date and with a third of China's millionaires now female an increasing number of China's women are prioritising their work life. The result is 200 million singles in China and it keeps growing..., as Johnny Du, the CEO of one of China's top internet dating sites, explains. According to Johnny Du the women also set the bar too high. Woman are really picky; they want the man to be very rich, young, handsome, educated.... Some parents have become so desperate they are taking details of their single children around marriage markets. As the ambitions of the West meet the traditions of the East, it's a dangerous cultural hang-up that's causing a social time-bomb.

SBS Australia – Ref. 5644

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Why does the US have so many child brides? - BBC News

Angel was 13 when her mother forced her to marry and start a family. I felt like a slave, she says of her childhood.
While countries like Zimbabwe, Malawi and El Salvador have recently banned child marriage, it remains legal in the US - and half of states have no set minimum age below which you cannot get married.
For the BBC's America First? series the BBC's Aleem Maqbool is exploring health and social issues where the US, the richest country in the world, does not perform well in international rankings.
Video by Franz Strasser; produced by Ashley Semler

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An insight into the issue of China's rapidly ageing population.
Elderly people in China are traditionally venerated. But the speed of China's development is causing social and demographic change. More and more elderly people are choosing to live in retirement homes rather than putting pressure on their children.

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