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This Incredible Animation Shows How Deep The Ocean Really Is

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Deepest Part of The Oceans - Full Documentary HD

Measuring the Greatest Ocean Depth
The Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench is the deepest known point in Earth's oceans. In 2010 the United States Center for Coastal & Ocean Mapping measured the depth of the Challenger Deep at 10,994 meters (36,070 feet) below sea level with an estimated vertical accuracy of ± 40 meters. If Mount Everest, the highest mountain on Earth, were placed at this location it would be covered by over one mile of water.

The first depth measurements in the Mariana Trench were made by the British survey ship HMS Challenger, which was used by the Royal Navy in 1875 to conduct research in the trench. The greatest depth that they recorded at that time was 8,184 meters (26,850 feet).

In 1951, another Royal Navy vessel, also named the HMS Challenger, returned to the area for additional measurements. They discovered an even deeper location with a depth of 10,900 meters (35,760 feet) determined by echo sounding. The Challenger Deep was named after the Royal Navy vessel that made these measurements.

In 2009, sonar mapping done by researchers aboard the RV Kilo Moana, operated by the University of Hawaii, determined the depth to be 10,971 meters (35,994 feet) with a potential error of ± 22 meters. The most recent measurement, done in 2010, is the 10,994 meter ( ± 40 meter accuracy) depth reported at the top of this article, measured by the United States Center for Coastal & Ocean Mapping.
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Incredible Animation Shows How Far Away Space Is

Incredible Animation Shows How High our Space is Located at
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This Incredible Animation Shows How Deep The Ocean Really Is (REACTION)

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Deep Sea Creatures [National Geographic Documentary 2017 HD]

Deep Sea Creatures [National Geographic Documentary 2017 HD]

The Deep sea creature refers to organisms that live below the photic zone of the ocean. These creatures must survive in extremely harsh conditions, such as hundreds of bars of pressure, small amounts of oxygen, very little food, no sunlight, and constant, extreme cold. Most creatures have to depend on food floating down from above.
These creatures live in very demanding environments, such as the abyssal or hadal zones, which, being thousands of meters below the surface, are almost completely devoid of light. The water is between 3 and 10 degrees Celsius and has low oxygen levels. Due to the depth, the pressure is between 20 and 1,000 bars. Creatures that live hundreds or even thousands of meters deep in the ocean have adapted to the high pressure, lack of light, and other factors.

The depths of the ocean are festooned with the most nightmarish creatures imaginable. You might think you’re safe, because these critters live thousands of feet down in a cold dark abyss, but the vampire squid, which looks like a nightmare umbrella, and the frilled shark—a literal living fossil—will live on in the recesses of your mind long after you’ve clicked away. Enjoy these deep sea horrors and try to have a relaxing day afterward.

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What Would a Trip to the Mariana Trench Be Like?

Ever wanted to take a dive into the deepest parts of the ocean? Well, today you’re gonna have this opportunity! Now, how good are you at holding your breath? Not that good? Well not to worry. Hop on board of my submersible craft and join me in the voyage to the depths! Ready? Let’s dive!

The Mariana trench begins at about 19,700 ft deep. It’s both the least explored and the most fascinating area for the scientists and adventurers alike. The Challenger Deep is the bottom of the Mariana trench, and its depth is 35,853 ft. Few people have been here, and very little is known about it yet. But scientists aren’t going to stop, and there’s hope we’ll soon find out what secrets the depths of the ocean hold. Ready? Let’s dive!

Other videos you might like:
Mariana Trench Creatures That Are Scarier Than Megalodon
How Deep Is the Ocean In Reality?
Who Lives at the Bottom of the Bermuda Triangle?

TIMESTAMPS:
Something interesting about orcas 1:03
What decompression sickness is 1:47
The dark part of the ocean 2:11
Why blue whales are so awesome 3:14 ????
The creature with eyes the size of frisbees 4:09
The Midnight Zone 4:49
“I don’t see you, but I’ll still eat you.” Brr! 5:20 ????
Black dragonfish (It looks like something from a horror movie) 6:19
It’s time to delve into the Abyss 7:24
The black swallower (Now I'm scared) 8:01 ????
The deepest shipwreck 8:48 ⛵️
The deepest fish ever found 9:22
The very bottom of the Earth 9:53

#ocean #MarianaTrench #brightside

SUMMARY:
- At 65 ft, there’s a whole new world opening before your eyes: shallow coral reefs are standing beautifully not far from the shore.
- 130 ft is the depth where we say goodbye even to recreational scuba divers — it’s the maximum allowed for them.
- At 230 ft we meet whale sharks — the largest known fish species, weighing up to 60 tons.
- And now we’re entering the dark part of the ocean: at 490 ft, just 1% of the light from the surface reaches us.
- Going deeper now, and at 1,640 ft you’re going to see the last of the blue whales — no, not really the last of them, I mean, that’s the deepest they can swim.
- At the depth of 2,723 ft we have reached the point where the Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world, would not even show its tip on the surface if it were put underwater.
- The giant squid inhabits the depths of 2,950 ft. Just imagine the creature with eyes the size of frisbees!
- The Midnight Zone. The pressure here is so huge that, if you somehow end up being here without a submersible, you’ll simply be crushed in a couple of seconds.
- 4,200 ft down below, and we see the ferocious great white sharks — these ultimate predators feel great at such a depth.
- See those huge nets? That’s because we’re now at the depth of 4,900 ft where the “catch-all” fishing method is used.
- At 6,000 ft, if we were in the Grand Canyon, we’d be sitting at its lowest and deepest point.
- Now, if we’re really careful, then at the depth of 6,600 ft, we’ll be able to see the black dragonfish — a nightmarish creature that dwells in the deep and dark parts of the ocean.
- At 7,400 ft we’ll be saying goodbye to sperm whales — this is the deepest point they can dive.
- At 15,000 ft, the monsters out of your worst nightmares pop up.
- The black swallower can swallow prey that’s twice its size!
- And now the deepest and darkest part of the ocean begins: we’re diving into the Mariana trench. Officially, it begins at about 19,700 ft deep.
- Going lower and deeper, you won’t see any other kind of fish or vertebrate animal whatsoever — the pressure is just too much for such creatures.

Music by Epidemic Sound

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What Are The Sea Zones? Explaining Deep Sea Exploration - Behind the News

This is an excerpt from the BTN story DEEP SEA EXPLORATION


The Ocean is actually split up into 3 zones. The first is the Sunlight Zone. That's where a lot of the most well-known fish live and is about as far down as most humans can go. At 200 metres, you reach the Twilight Zone, where light starts to disappear. At more than 1000 metres down, sunlight disappears completely. This is the Midnight Zone. It's a cold, dark place that we still don't know much about. It's also where huge, freaky sea life starts appearing, like the giant squid. But it's still not even close to the bottom in most places on earth. The lowest point is a whopping 11,000 metres down. That's about the same depth as stacking 36 Eiffel towers on top of each other. That place is called Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench.

Most Mysterious Deep Sea Sounds Ever Recorded

In today's BlueGum we will look at the Most Mysterious Deep Sea Sounds Ever Recorded.
The ocean really is unbelievably big and that makes it pretty scary by itself. 71% of the Earth's surface is covered by the various seas. The Pacific Ocean alone, already has a larger surface than all the continents of the world combined and is on average about 4000m deep.
No wonder that this gigantic space has hardly been explored by us humans so far. It is said that the back of the moon is better known than the ocean and that's true. Today only about 5% of the sea has been really explored.
Of course this raises the question of what could live down there. The first things that come to mind are mystical creatures of legends that make you shudder.
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Music: Kevin Macleod


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This incredible graphic shows you just how deep the ocean really is

This incredible graphic shows you just how deep the ocean really is
View the graphic image on

This incredible animation shows how deep the ocean really is

Wow I didn't know some of them facts. If you did comment & tell me what u knew, Peace. :3.

Link to the vid:

This incredible animation shows how deep the ocean really is

Just how deep does the ocean go? Way further than you think. This animation puts the actual distance into perspective, showing a vast distance between
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This Incredible Animation Shows How Deep The Ocean Really Is

#Toonworld

Incredible Animation Shows How Deep Humans Have Dug

If we were to journey to the center of the Earth, it would take a lot longer than you might expect. Here's how deep humans have dug underground.

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The Ocean is Way Deeper Than You Think

The Ocean is a deep and scary world that is completely removed from most of our lives. In this video I explore just how deep the ocean actually is while discussing some of the strange life down there... and other just plain weird and odd things about the ocean. Feel free to leave any comments and share what you found interesting, or anything else you think that I should have added!

Music is by Ross Bugden, seriously, his channel is great.

Song used is called Something Wicked

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How Deep Is The Ocean? - Incredible Animation Shows Us

Courtesy of Tech Insider -- Song: Bottom of the Sea by Dhruva Aliman ...and ...The deepest part of the ocean is called the Challenger Deep and is located beneath the western Pacific Ocean in the southern end of the Mariana Trench, which runs several hundred kilometers southwest of the U.S. territorial island of Guam. Challenger Deep is approximately 36,200 feet deep.

Depths from the surface to 0.2km is known as the “littoral zone”, from 0.2km to 3km, the “bathyal zone”, and from 3km to 6km, the “abyssal zone”. Anything deeper than that is the “hadal zone”.

The hadal zone is largely comprised of deep trenches caused by tectonic plate subduction that drive the vast abyssal plains steeply down to depths of 11,000 metres in places. But even here, animals thrive, blissfully unaware of how little attention they receive. Here’s an insight into their incredible world.

The term “hadal” comes from “Hades,” which refers both to the Greek kingdom of the Underworld and the god of the Underworld himself, Hades (brother of Zeus and Poseidon). The term can also mean the “abode of the dead”. In modern times, Hades is seen as evil, but in mythology he was often portrayed as unreasonably “stringent” rather than actively malicious. Interestingly, he strictly prohibited the inhabitants of his dominion to leave, which is a rather apt analogy for hadal fauna, as these species are often confined to trenches and are rarely capable of going elsewhere.

The extreme depths of the hadal trenches were discovered using “bomb sounding”, whereby someone threw a half-pound block of TNT off a ship and the echo was recorded on board the ship. This method was used to sound the depths of many trenches, but the exact depth of the deepest point, currently in the Mariana Trench, is still difficult to compute. Four other trenches, all in the Western Pacific, also exceed 10km: the Tonga, Kuril-Kamchatka, Philippine, and Kermadec trenches.

The HMS Challenger expedition (1873 to 1876) was the first to sample hadal depths – having collected sediment from about 8km – although it could not confirm whether or not the sediment was merely the remnants of shallower animals. The 1901 Princess Alice expedition successfully trawled specimens from over 6km. However, it was a 1948 Swedish expedition, which successfully trawled a variety of species from 7km to 8km in the Puerto Rico Trench, that finally proved that life existed at depths greater than 6km. In 1956, the first photographs of the hadal zone were taken by none other than

The hadal zone comprises a series of disjointed trenches and other deep spots. There are 33 trenches and 13 troughs around the world – 46 individual hadal habitats in total. The mean depth of the trenches is 8.216km. The total area of the hadal zone is less than 0.2% of the entire seafloor but accounts for 45% of the total depth range. It is therefore surprising that the deepest 45% of the sea is rarely mentioned in deep sea literature.

Of the 33 hadal trenches, 26 (84%) are located in the Pacific, three are found in the Atlantic (8%), two (4%) in the Indian Ocean, and two (4%) in the Southern Ocean. The majority run up the western Pacific. Most of the hadal trenches in their modern form are believed to have formed 65.5m years ago during the Cenozoic period.

Earth appears to be the only terrestrial planet with subduction zones and plate tectonics. Both Mercury and the Earth’s moon are tectonically dead. Mars appears to have tectonically ceased, and Venus is dominated by thick lithosphere with mantle plumes. On Earth, subduction zones produce continental crust, which can protrude from the ocean (the continents). It has been speculated that without subduction, the land would still be underwater and terrestrial life, including humans, would never have evolved.

Many marine organisms are found at hadal depths and the most common groups are the polychaetes, bivalves, gastropods, amphipods and holothurians. All of these groups are found at full-ocean depth and often in large aggregations. Contrary to popular media, the hadal zone is not a mysterious realm inhabited by aliens or “monsters of the deep”. Instead, it is a poorly understood region largely inhabited by hoppers, snails, worms, and sea cucumbers. In fact, the upper trenches are inhabited by little pink fish and bright red prawns.

The 2011 magnitude 9.0 Tōhoku-Oki earthquake off Japan was caused by a fault rupture in the Japan Trench. The event and subsequent tsunami left about 20,000 dead or missing and affected more than 35 coastal cities. The quake was followed by 666 aftershocks that exceeded magnitude 5.0. The energy involved in high-magnitude earthquakes originating in trenches is immense. The 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake in the Java Trench caused a sufficiently massive release of energy to alter the Earth’s rotation, shortening the day by 2.68 microseconds.

This Incredible Animation Shows How Deep The Ocean Really Is

Just how deep does the ocean go? Way further than you think. This animation puts the actual distance into perspective, showing a vast distance between the waves we see and the mysterious point we call Challenger Deep.

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#DeepSea #Ocean #TechInsider

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This Incredible Animation Shows How Deep The Ocean Really Is
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8 Incredible Deep Sea Oddities!

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There's some strange creatures down in the deep …
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We know more about some other planets than we do about the deepest corners of Earth's oceans, and the species we've found there are almost alien. Here's some of the most unbelievable oddities ever observed! Special thanks to the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) for help with this video!

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(Whale illustrations by Nobu Tamura/CC-BY-3.0)

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The Alvin Submarine Part 2: Incredible Views On-Board the Deep-Sea Vessel​

The technological upgrades on the U.S. Navy-owned Alvin submersible allow the deep-sea diving vessel to go to new depths. Reaching 98 percent of the sea floor, the submarine is able to explore complex hydrothermal vents and ecosystems.


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The Alvin Submarine Part 2: Incredible Views On-Board the Deep-Sea Vessel​

Great Animation Shows How Deep Humans Dug Into The Earth

Courtesy of Tech Insider --- Extreme Journey to the center of the Earth - Scientific drilling into the Earth is a way for scientists to probe the Earth's sediments, crust, and upper mantle. In addition to rock samples, drilling technology can unearth samples of connate fluids and of the subsurface biosphere, mostly microbial life, preserved in drilled samples. Most of the technology used for drilling come from advances in the oil and gas industry. Scientific drilling is carried out on land by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) and at sea by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). Scientific drilling on the continents includes drilling down into solid ground as well as drilling from small boats on lakes. Sampling thick glaciers and ice sheets to obtain ice cores is related but will not be described further here.

Like probes sent into outer space, scientific drilling is a technology used to obtain samples from places that people cannot reach. Human beings have descended as deep as 2,080 m (6,822 ft) in Voronya Cave, the world's deepest known cave, located in the Caucasus mountains of the country of Georgia. Gold miners in South Africa regularly go deeper than 3,400 m, but no human has ever descended to greater depths than this below the Earth's solid surface. As depth increases into the Earth, temperature and pressure rise. Temperatures in the crust increase about 15°C per kilometer, making it impossible for humans to exist at depths greater than several kilometers, even if it was somehow possible to keep shafts open in spite of the tremendous pressure.

Scientific drilling is interdisciplinary and international in scope. Individual scientists cannot generally undertake scientific drilling projects alone. Teamwork between scientists, engineers, and administrators is often required for success in planning and in carrying out a drilling project, analyzing the samples, and interpreting and publishing the results in scientific journals.

Humans have reached the moon and are planning to return samples from Mars, but when it comes to exploring the land deep beneath our feet, we have only scratched the surface of our planet.
This may be about to change with a $1 billion mission to drill 6 km (3.7 miles) beneath the seafloor to reach the Earth's mantle -- a 3000 km-thick layer of slowly deforming rock between the crust and the core which makes up the majority of our planet -- and bring back the first ever fresh samples.
It could help answer some of our biggest questions about the origins and evolution of Earth itself, with almost all of the sea floor and continents that make up the Earth´s surface originating from the mantle.
Geologists involved in the project are already comparing it to the Apollo Moon missions in terms of the value of the samples it could yield.
However, in order to reach those samples, the team of international scientists must first find a way to grind their way through ultra-hard rocks with 10 km-long (6.2 miles) drill pipes -- a technical challenge that one of the project co-leaders Damon Teagle, from the UK's University of Southampton calls, the most challenging endeavor in the history of Earth science.
'A ship flying in space:' Earth seen through the eyes of an astronaut
Their task will be all the more difficult for being conducted out in the middle of the ocean. It is here that the Earth´s crust is at its thinnest at around 6 km compared to as much as 60 km (37.3 miles) on land.
Drilling all the way to the mantle would also give geologists a look at what they call the Mohorovičić discontinuity, or Moho, for short. Above this mysterious zone, named for the Croatian seismologist who discovered it in 1909, seismic waves travel at around 4.3 miles per second, a rate consistent with those waves traveling through basalt, or cooled lava. Below the Moho, the waves rip along at around 5 miles per second, similar to the rate they travel through a silica-poor type of igneous rock called peridotite. The Moho typically lies between 3 to 6 miles below the ocean floor and anywhere between 12 to 56 miles beneath the continents.

This zone has long been considered the crust-mantle boundary, where material gradually cools and sticks to the overlying crust. But some lab studies suggest it’s possible that the Moho represents the zone where water seeping down from the overlying crust reacts with mantle peridotites to create a type of mineral called serpentine. This possibility is exciting, Dick and MacLeod suggest. The geochemical reactions that generate serpentine also produce hydrogen, which can then react with seawater to produce methane, a source of energy for some types of bacteria. Or, the researchers note, the Moho could be something else entirely unknown to science.

Music: Land of Giants by Dhruva Aliman

What’s Hiding at the Most Solitary Place on Earth? The Deep Sea

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Sometimes the world feels boring. All the remote islands are visited, the arctic conquered, the dense jungles discovered. Except, there is still a place to explore: A wet deadly desert where mysterious creatures live in total darkness: The deep sea. Let us dive down.

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The Ocean is Way Deeper Than You Think REACTIONS MASHUP

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