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This could be why you're depressed or anxious | Johann Hari

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This could be why you're depressed or anxious | Johann Hari

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In a moving talk, journalist Johann Hari shares fresh insights on the causes of depression and anxiety from experts around the world -- as well as some exciting emerging solutions. If you're depressed or anxious, you're not weak and you're not crazy -- you're a human being with unmet needs, Hari says.

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Johann Hari discusses the real causes of depression

Journalist and author Johann Hari, who took antidepressants for 13 years, discusses his theories around what causes the mental illness - leading to columnist Nina Myscow revealing she once had to rebuild her life after she had a mental breakdown that left her in a nursing home.

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Johann Hari - The Antidote for Loneliness

Did you know being acutely lonely is as bad for your health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day? In this video, author Johann Hari outlines the importance of feeling connected to those around us.
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The Rising Depression and Anxiety Crisis with Johann Hari

Bestselling author Johann Hari discovered that, in reality, depression and anxiety are caused largely by crucial changes in the way we are living. Using vivid human stories and social science, he explains the evidence.

Watch Johann Hari, bestselling author, in our latest RSA Spotlight - the edits which take you straight to the heart of the event!

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What the best science really says about depression | Johann Hari | Big Think

What the best science really says about depression
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For almost the past 100 years, some mental health professionals have told us that depression is purely caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain. However, there's a much more realistic theory that depression happens due to an imbalance happening outside of your cranium. Journalist and author Johann Hari believes that while for some people it is a chemical imbalance, for many people suffering from depression, the cause stems from societal issues. Hari offers some staggering statistics showing that antidepressants seem to be doing much more harm than good — among them, that one out of every four middle-aged women in the United States is taking a chemical antidepressant in any given year. If we want to get rid of modern-day depression, he says, we have to change society. Johann Hari's new book is Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression – and the Unexpected Solutions.
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JOHANN HARI:

Johann Hari is the New York Times bestselling author of Chasing the Scream, which is being adapted into a feature film. He was twice named Newspaper Journalist of the Year by Amnesty International UK. He has written for many of the world’s leading newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, Le Monde, the Guardian, the Los Angeles Times, the New Republic, the Nation, Slate, El Mundo, and the Sydney Morning Herald. He was a lead op-ed columnist for the Independent, one of Britain’s leading newspapers, for nine years. He is a regular panelist on HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher. His TED talk, “Everything You Think You Know About Addiction Is Wrong,” has more than 20 million views.
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TRANSCRIPT:

Johann Hari: I kept learning intellectually about what causes depression and anxiety.

And that it’s much deeper than the story I’d been told by my doctor—that it’s just a missing chemical in your brain.

But I think it really emotionally fell into place when I went and met an incredible South African psychiatrist called Derek Summerfield. So Derek was in Cambodia when chemical antidepressants were first introduced there. And the Cambodian doctors didn’t know what they were, right? They’d never heard of it. So he explained it to them and they said, “Oh, we don’t need them. We’ve already got antidepressants.”

And Derek said what do you mean?

He thought they were going to talk about some kind of herbal remedy or something.

Instead they told him a story. There was a farmer in their community who one day, a rice farmer, who one day had stood on a landmine and had his leg blown off. And so they gave him an artificial limb and he went back to work in the fields. But it’s apparently very painful to work in water when you’ve got an artificial limb. And I imagine it was quite traumatic—He’s going back to the fields where he was blown up.

And he started crying all day. He didn’t want to get out of bed. Classic depression, right? And so they said to Derek, “Well we gave him an antidepressant.” Derek said what did you do? They explained that they sat with him, they listened to his problems, they realized that his pain made sense. He was depressed for perfectly good reasons. They figured if we bought him a cow he could become a dairy farmer then he wouldn’t be so depressed. They bought him a cow. Within a few weeks his crying stopped, he felt fine.

They said to Derek, “You see, Doctor, that cow was an antidepressant.” Now if you’ve been raised to think about depression the way that we’ve been indoctrinated to, that it’s just the result of – there are real biological factors but it’s just the result of a chemical imbalance in your brain—that sounds like a joke, a bad joke. They gave the guy a cow as an antidepressant and he stopped being depressed?

But what those Cambodian doctors knew intuitively is what the World Health Organization has been trying to tell us for years. Depression is a response to things going wrong deep in our lives and our environments. Our pain makes sense.

As the World Health Organization put it, mental health is produced socially. It’s a social indicator. It requires social as well as individual solutions. It requires social change, right?

Now that is a very different way of thinking about depression and anxiety but it happens to fit with the best scientific evidence.

And it really required me to reassess how I’d felt about my own pain and how I tried to deal it unsuccessfully and open up a whole different way...

Read the full transcript at

The one factor causing depression and anxiety in the workplace | Johann Hari | Big Think

The one factor causing depression and anxiety in the workplace
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Expressions like feeling down or feeling low are more literal than we think, says Lost Connections author Johann Hari. A 30-year field study of wild African baboons by the incredible Stanford University professor Robert Sapolsky has shown that there is a remarkable relationship between depression, anxiety, and social hierarchies. Male baboons—who live in a very strict pecking order—suffer the most psychological stress when their social status is insecure, or when they are on the bottom rung, looking up at the luxuries of others. Does it sound familiar yet? If you live in the United States... we’re at the greatest levels of inequality since the 1920s, says Hari. There’s a few people at the very top, there’s a kind of precarious middle, and there’s a huge and swelling bottom. It's no coincidence that mental health gets poorer as the wealth gap continues to widen: depression and anxiety are socioeconomic diseases. The silver lining is that this relationship has been discovered. Could an economic revolution end the depression epidemic? And, most curiously, what can we learn from the Amish on this front? Johann Hari is the author of Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression – and the Unexpected Solutions.
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JOHANN HARI :
Johann Hari is the New York Times bestselling author of Chasing the Scream, which is being adapted into a feature film. He was twice named Newspaper Journalist of the Year by Amnesty International UK. He has written for many of the world’s leading newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, Le Monde, the Guardian, the Los Angeles Times, the New Republic, the Nation, Slate, El Mundo, and the Sydney Morning Herald. He was a lead op-ed columnist for the Independent, one of Britain’s leading newspapers, for nine years. He is a regular panelist on HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher. His TED talk, “Everything You Think You Know About Addiction Is Wrong,” has more than 20 million views.
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TRANSCRIPT:
Johann Hari: When I feel depressed, like loads of people I say, “I feel down,” right?
And as I was learning about the causes of depression and anxiety for my book 'Lost Connections' I started to realize—I don’t think that’s a metaphor. There’s this amazing professor at Stanford called Robert Sapolsky who, in his early twenties, went to live with a troop of baboons in Kenya. And it was his job to figure out: when are baboons most stressed out?
So his job was to hit them with little tranquilizer darts and then take a blood test and measure something called cortisol, which is a hormone that baboons and us release when we’re stressed. And baboons live in this hierarchy—so the females don’t, interestingly—but the men live in a very strict hierarchy. So if there’s 30 men, number one knows he’s above number two. Number two knows he’s above number three. Number 12 knows he’s above number 13. And that really determines a lot; it determines who you get to have sex with, it determines what you get to eat, it determines whether you get to sit in the shade or you’re pushed out into the heat. So really it's significant where you are in the hierarchy.
And what Professor Sapolsky found is that baboons are most stressed in two situations. One is when their status is insecure. So if you’re the top guy and someone’s circling which comes for you, you will be massively stressed.
And the other situation is when you feel you’re at the bottom of the hierarchy, you’ve been kind of humiliated. And what Professor Sapolsky noticed—and then it was later developed by other scientists—is, when you feel you’ve been pushed to the bottom, what you do is you show something called a submission gesture.
So you, baboons will raise— I say “you,” I assume no baboons are watching this, maybe they are—a baboon will put its body down physically or put it’s head down or put its bottom in the air and it will cover its head. So it’s clearly seems to be communicating: “Just leave me alone. You’ve beaten me, okay? You’ve beaten me.”
And what lots of scientists, like Professor Paul Gilbert in Britain and Professor Kate Pickett and Professor Richard Wilkinson, also in Britain, have really developed is this idea that actually what human depression is, in part—not entirely, but in part—is a form of a submission gesture. It’s a way of saying, “I can’t cope with this anymore,” right. Particularly people who feel th...
For the full transcript, check out

Depression and the Secret to Happiness | Johann Hari

Society is making us depressed but it’s okay Johann Hari has found the secret to happiness ????

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Everything You Think You Know About Addiction Is Wrong TedTalk Johann Hari TED Talks 720p

Johann Hari on Lost Connections

We discussed depression and anxiety with Johann Hari, author of the new book Lost Connections called “wise, probing and deeply generous” by Naomi Klein and “a brilliant, stimulating, radical take on mental health” by Matt Haig.

Loneliness kills: How to fight depression with social support | Johann Hari | Big Think

Loneliness kills: How to fight depression with social support

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Thanks in no small part to the digitization of our social lives, depression is becoming a bigger and bigger issue in western societies. In the space of just one generation, we've closed ourselves off and now spend more time in front of screens — on average, 10 hours a day according to a Neilsen report — than we do with our loved ones. Author and journalist and author Johann Hari explains that this isn't at all how the human species is supposed to behave. He suggests more actual face time with people, more community, and above all: becoming the social creatures that we have been for millennia. Johann's new book is the fascinating
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JOHANN HARI:

Johann Hari is the New York Times bestselling author of Chasing the Scream, which is being adapted into a feature film. He was twice named Newspaper Journalist of the Year by Amnesty International UK. He has written for many of the world’s leading newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, Le Monde, the Guardian, the Los Angeles Times, the New Republic, the Nation, Slate, El Mundo, and the Sydney Morning Herald. He was a lead op-ed columnist for the Independent, one of Britain’s leading newspapers, for nine years. He is a regular panelist on HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher. His TED talk, “Everything You Think You Know About Addiction Is Wrong,” has more than 20 million views.
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TRANSCRIPT:
Johann Hari: There’s a really heartbreaking study that asked Americans, “How many close friends do you have that you can call on in a crisis?”

And when they started doing it decades ago the most common answer was five. Today the most common answer is none. It’s not the average but it’s the most common answer.

And I thought a lot about that in so many of the places I’ve been in the United States. I interviewed and got to know an incredible man called Professor John Cacioppo, a world expert on loneliness. He’s at the University of Chicago.

And Professor Cacioppo explained to me, you know, if you think about the circumstances where human beings evolved, right, we evolved—the reason why you’re able to watch this through your laptop or wherever you’re watching it, the reason why we exist is because our ancestors on the savannahs of Africa were really good at one thing. They weren’t bigger than the animals they took down but they were much better at cooperating than them.

Every human instinct human beings have is to be part of a cooperative tribe, right. Bees need a hive. Humans need a tribe. And if you think about the circumstances where human beings evolved, if you were separated from the group you would become depressed and anxious for an incredibly good reason. You were in terrible danger. You were probably about to die. Those are the instincts we still have.

Yet we’ve told ourselves a story that we can live without tribes. We are the first human beings ever to try to live without communities, to imagine that like some cowboy on the horizon—and even the cowboys didn’t do it this way—we can live alone, we can be alone. That’s not the species we are.

And it’s causing, and Professor Cacioppo has proven that this loneliness epidemic is one of the key causes of the epidemic of depression and anxiety that we have across our society.

And I was really interested to find out well, who has acted on that? Who has tried to find an antidepressant for the loneliness crisis? I met an incredible man, one of the heroes of my book Lost Connections called Sam Everington. Sam is a doctor in East London, one of the poorest parts of East London actually where I lived for many years.

And Sam was really uncomfortable because he had loads of patients coming to him who were depressed and anxious. And he had been told in his training even though he knew the science was much more sophisticated than this to tell people, “Well you feel this way because you’ve got a chemical imbalance in your brain,” and just give them drugs.

Like me, Sam is not opposed to those drugs. He’s in favor of them but he just thought this is not enough. This isn’t solving the reason why these people are depressed and anxious.

He could see how lonely and cut-off they were. So he pioneered a different approach. And I’ll tell you about it through one of the patients of his that I got to know.

A woman called Lisa Cunningham came to Sam, and Lisa has been shut away in her home for seven years with crippling anxiety and depression.

Read the full transcript at
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8 Signs Someone is Secretly Depressed

Have you ever heard of the term “smiling depression”, “high-functioning depression” or “hidden depression”? As these names imply, this is when a clinically depressed person tries to keep the depression a secret from others. They often appear cheerful, successful, and seemingly put-together - leading you to the belief their lives are perfectly happy, fine and without mental illness.

#depression #mentalhealth #hiddendepression

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Suggested video(s):
5 Things Not To Say To Someone With Depression


Writer: Chloe Avenasa
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VO: Amanda Silvera
Animator: Clarisse Lim Xingyi
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References:
· Brownhill, Suzanne, et al. “‘Big build’: hidden depression in men.” Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry10 (2005): 921-931.
· Abroms, Gene M. “The diagnosis and treatment of hidden depression.” Psychiatric Quarterly4 (1981): 235-241.
· Fisch, Robert Z., and Gidon Nesher. “Masked depression: Help for the hidden misery.” Postgraduate medicine3 (1986): 165-169.
· Grohol, J. (2018). 6 Secret Signs of Hidden Depression. Psych Central. Retrieved on February 7, 2020, from

Would you like to help share our content? Contact us at editorial@psych2go.net

Johann Hari Challenges What We Think About Depression | Studio 10

Could we be looking for solutions to depression in the wrong places? Journalist and author Johann Hari shares his research from his book 'Lost Connections'.

Get more out of your mornings with Studio 10 | 8.30am – 12pm weekdays on Channel Ten featuring hosts Sarah Harris, Joe Hildebrand, Angela Bishop, Kerri-Anne Kennerley, Denise Scott and Denise Drysdale.

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Johann Hari slices and dices Richard Littlejohn - the full version

Johann Hari challenges Richard Littlejohn over his propagation of anti-asylum seeker lies. Littlejohn responds by ruthlessly exposing the biggest flaw in Hari's argument: his youthful looks.

You can read Hari's account of the interview here:

Is neoliberalism making us depressed and anxious? Johann Hari explains

This event was recorded at Houseman’s bookshop on 11th April, 2018. To get the audiobook or physical book Johann is discussing here, go to

????JOHANN HARI: The Real Cause of Your Stress, Anxiety or Depression & the Surprising Solutions!

If you’ve ever struggled with anxiety or depression, then do we have the Lost Connections show for you!

Today I’ll be talking with Johann Hari, award-winning journalist, the best-selling author of at least seven books including Chasing the Scream Ted-Talker Extraordinaire (his talk on connection has been viewed over 25 million times), and the author of a brilliant new book on Depression, The Lost Connections.

And that’s just what I want to talk with him about today, about uncovering the real causes of depression and the unexpected solutions.

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MORE ON JOHANN HARI:

Johann Hari is a New York Times best-selling author. His book ‘Chasing the Scream: the First and Last Days of the War on Drugs’ has been translated into 15 languages and is currently being adapted into a major Hollywood film, and into a non-fiction documentary series.

He is one of the most-viewed TED talkers of all time: his talk, ‘Everything You Think You Know About Addiction is Wrong’, has (along with the animation based on it) been viewed more than 20 million times.

He has written over the past seven years for some of the world’s leading newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Guardian, the Spectator, Le Monde Diplomatique, the Melbourne Age, and Politico. He has also appeared on leading TV shows, including HBO’s Realtime With Bill Maher.

He was twice named ‘National Newspaper Journalist of the Year’ by Amnesty International. He has also been named ‘Cultural Commentator of the Year’ and ‘Environmental Commentator of the Year’ at the Comment Awards.

He lives half the year in London, and spends the other half of the year traveling to research his books.
To read about what Johann is working on now, click here.

Key Topics:
* How did Johann Hari end up clinically depressed?
* What was really going on?
* How long was he on anti-depressants?
* How can a cow literally be a type of anti-depressant???
* How did he begin a 40,000 mile quest to understand stress and depression?
* What did he learn about why people are feeling so depressed and severely anxious?
* Could something other than bad brain chemistry be causing depression and anxiety?
* How have we been misinformed about what depression and anxiety really art?
* Are stress and depression really in our heads?
* Is our environment kick-starting our depression?
* What can we learn about shame and depression?
* What are the top causes of depression and anxiety?
* What are disconnections?
* What’s the importance of others in our lives?
* What’s the importance of meaningful work?
* What’s the importance of meaningful values?
* Can materialism actually cause depression?
* What can we learn about baboons and depression?
* What’s the harm in being disconnected from the “natural” world?
* What’s the importance of a hopeful future?
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This Might Be Why You're Unhappy

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I decided to make this piece to talk about something I've struggled with quite a bit this year. It has to do with my ego, and although I'm not proud of this, just being honest about where I'm at and making this was really helpful.

Comparison is the thief of joy, were words from Theodore Roosevelt and they feel very relevant in a competitive world.

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Depression and anxiety: How inequality is driving the mental health crisis | Johann Hari

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Expressions like feeling down or feeling low are more literal than we think, says Lost Connections author Johann Hari. A 30-year field study of wild African baboons by the incredible Stanford University professor Robert Sapolsky has shown that there is a remarkable relationship between depression, anxiety, and social hierarchies. Male baboons—who live in a very strict pecking order—suffer the most psychological stress when their social status is insecure, or when they are on the bottom rung, looking up at the luxuries of others. Does it sound familiar yet? If you live in the United States... we’re at the greatest levels of inequality since the 1920s, says Hari. There’s a few people at the very top, there’s a kind of precarious middle, and there’s a huge and swelling bottom. It's no coincidence that mental health gets poorer as the wealth gap continues to widen: depression and anxiety are socioeconomic diseases. The silver lining is that this relationship has been discovered. Could an economic revolution end the depression epidemic? And, most curiously, what can we learn from the Amish on this front? Johann Hari is the author of Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression – and the Unexpected Solutions.

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JOHANN HARI

Johann Hari is the New York Times bestselling author of Chasing the Scream, which is being adapted into a feature film. He was twice named Newspaper Journalist of the Year by Amnesty International UK. He has written for many of the world’s leading newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, Le Monde, the Guardian, the Los Angeles Times, the New Republic, the Nation, Slate, El Mundo, and the Sydney Morning Herald. He was a lead op-ed columnist for the Independent, one of Britain’s leading newspapers, for nine years. He is a regular panelist on HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher. His TED talk, “Everything You Think You Know About Addiction Is Wrong,” has more than 20 million views.







 


 

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TRANSCRIPT:

Johann Hari: When I feel depressed, like loads of people I say, “I feel down,” right?


And as I was learning about the causes of depression and anxiety for my book 'Lost Connections' I started to realize—I don’t think that’s a metaphor. There’s this amazing professor at Stanford called Robert Sapolsky who, in his early twenties, went to live with a troop of baboons in Kenya. And it was his job to figure out: when are baboons most stressed out?


So his job was to hit them with little tranquilizer darts and then take a blood test and measure something called cortisol, which is a hormone that baboons and us release when we’re stressed. And baboons live in this hierarchy—so the females don’t, interestingly—but the men live in a very strict hierarchy. So if there’s 30 men, number one knows he’s above number two. Number two knows he’s above number three. Number 12 knows he’s above number 13. And that really determines a lot; it determines who you get to have sex with, it determines what you get to eat, it determines whether you get to sit in the shade or you’re pushed out into the heat. So really it's significant where you are in the hierarchy.


And what Professor Sapolsky found is that baboons are most stressed in two situations. One is when their status is insecure. So if you’re the top guy and someone’s circling which comes for you, you will be massively stressed.


And the other situation is when you feel you’re at the bottom of the hierarchy, you’ve been kind of humiliated. And what Professor Sapolsky noticed—and then it was later developed by other scientists—is, when you feel you’ve been pushed to the bottom, what you do is you show something called a submission gesture.


So you, baboons will raise— I say “you,” I assume no baboons are watching this, maybe they are—a baboon will put its body down physically or put it’s head down or put its bottom in the air and it will cover its head. So it’s clearly seems to be communicating: “Just leave me alone. You’ve beaten me, okay? You’ve beaten me.”


And what lots of scientists, like Professor Paul Gilbert in Britain and Professor Kate Pickett and Professor Richard Wilkinson, also in Britain, have really developed is this idea that actually what human depression is, in part—not entirely, but in part—is a form of a submission gesture. It’s a way of saying, “I can’t cope with this anymore,” right. Particularly people who feel th...

For the full transcript, check out

6 Key Lessons from Lost Connections by Johann Hari

For the longest time anxiety and depression has been blamed primarily on “chemical imbalances in the brain”. Johann Hari challenges this old school notions and points towards 9 very different causes for depression and anxiety.
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Disconnection from:
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???? Meaningful work
???? Meaningful values
????Other people
????Status and respect
???? Childhood trauma
???? The natural world
???? A hopeful and secure future
???? The real role of genes and brain changes (8 & 9)
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???? “You are not a machine with broken parts you are an animal whose need have not been met.
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We all have people around us, friends or family members, that suffer from depression. Reading this book helped me gain a deeper understanding why modern society is a breeding ground for mental disorders.
.
⁉️ What activities and habits in protect you from depression and anxiety ⁉️


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#booktube #nonfictionbooks #lostconnections

How Important Relationships Can Decrease Anxiety & Depression | Dr. Maxine Ruddock | TEDxBoggyCreek

When we are socially connected we feel less depressed or anxious, we feel better about ourselves, and have better overall mental and physical health. Although many people have hundreds or thousands of social connections, that is often not enough. As a matter of fact, more and more Baby Boomers, Millennials and GenZs are reporting that they feel lonely or disconnected from others. Join Clinical Psychologist and Life Coach Dr. Max as she talks about the alarming decline in social connectedness, the spiritual, physical and emotional benefits of developing positive relationships, and simple ways to increase meaningful relationships. Dr Maxine Ruddock is a clinical Psychologist who has been
successfully coaching and counseling people for many years.
She is also the clinical director at Comprehensive Psychological and Assessment Services where she manages the development of the mental health programs, provides consultation to upper level clinicians regarding especially challenging clinical cases and trains Masters and Doctorate level students. Dr Ruddock is passionate about helping people identify and live their created purpose and utilizes proven strategies for helping them to do so. She is especially passionate about working with women and specializes in women’s issues. disabilities. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at

Depressed or anxious? There Is An Answer

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After bumping into someone whom had been or is still in a state of depression and anxiety, I thought it worth posting this video on a method that could help.
This is not, in any way a promotion of any particular business, but instead a shining light on a methodology that I know helps people get out of the dark depths of depression and anxiety.
Its sad to say that both are on a significant increase in the western world, the world in which we supposedly have it all, yet there is so much working against us, that for many it is all too easy to fall foul of this terrible condition.

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