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This could be why you're depressed or anxious | Johann Hari

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This could be why you're depressed or anxious | Johann Hari

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In a moving talk, journalist Johann Hari shares fresh insights on the causes of depression and anxiety from experts around the world -- as well as some exciting emerging solutions. If you're depressed or anxious, you're not weak and you're not crazy -- you're a human being with unmet needs, Hari says.

The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. You're welcome to link to or embed these videos, forward them to others and share these ideas with people you know. For more information on using TED for commercial purposes (e.g. employee learning, in a film or online course), please submit a Media Request here:

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The one factor causing depression and anxiety in the workplace | Johann Hari | Big Think

The one factor causing depression and anxiety in the workplace
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Expressions like feeling down or feeling low are more literal than we think, says Lost Connections author Johann Hari. A 30-year field study of wild African baboons by the incredible Stanford University professor Robert Sapolsky has shown that there is a remarkable relationship between depression, anxiety, and social hierarchies. Male baboons—who live in a very strict pecking order—suffer the most psychological stress when their social status is insecure, or when they are on the bottom rung, looking up at the luxuries of others. Does it sound familiar yet? If you live in the United States... we’re at the greatest levels of inequality since the 1920s, says Hari. There’s a few people at the very top, there’s a kind of precarious middle, and there’s a huge and swelling bottom. It's no coincidence that mental health gets poorer as the wealth gap continues to widen: depression and anxiety are socioeconomic diseases. The silver lining is that this relationship has been discovered. Could an economic revolution end the depression epidemic? And, most curiously, what can we learn from the Amish on this front? Johann Hari is the author of Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression – and the Unexpected Solutions.
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JOHANN HARI :
Johann Hari is the New York Times bestselling author of Chasing the Scream, which is being adapted into a feature film. He was twice named Newspaper Journalist of the Year by Amnesty International UK. He has written for many of the world’s leading newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, Le Monde, the Guardian, the Los Angeles Times, the New Republic, the Nation, Slate, El Mundo, and the Sydney Morning Herald. He was a lead op-ed columnist for the Independent, one of Britain’s leading newspapers, for nine years. He is a regular panelist on HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher. His TED talk, “Everything You Think You Know About Addiction Is Wrong,” has more than 20 million views.
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TRANSCRIPT:
Johann Hari: When I feel depressed, like loads of people I say, “I feel down,” right?
And as I was learning about the causes of depression and anxiety for my book 'Lost Connections' I started to realize—I don’t think that’s a metaphor. There’s this amazing professor at Stanford called Robert Sapolsky who, in his early twenties, went to live with a troop of baboons in Kenya. And it was his job to figure out: when are baboons most stressed out?
So his job was to hit them with little tranquilizer darts and then take a blood test and measure something called cortisol, which is a hormone that baboons and us release when we’re stressed. And baboons live in this hierarchy—so the females don’t, interestingly—but the men live in a very strict hierarchy. So if there’s 30 men, number one knows he’s above number two. Number two knows he’s above number three. Number 12 knows he’s above number 13. And that really determines a lot; it determines who you get to have sex with, it determines what you get to eat, it determines whether you get to sit in the shade or you’re pushed out into the heat. So really it's significant where you are in the hierarchy.
And what Professor Sapolsky found is that baboons are most stressed in two situations. One is when their status is insecure. So if you’re the top guy and someone’s circling which comes for you, you will be massively stressed.
And the other situation is when you feel you’re at the bottom of the hierarchy, you’ve been kind of humiliated. And what Professor Sapolsky noticed—and then it was later developed by other scientists—is, when you feel you’ve been pushed to the bottom, what you do is you show something called a submission gesture.
So you, baboons will raise— I say “you,” I assume no baboons are watching this, maybe they are—a baboon will put its body down physically or put it’s head down or put its bottom in the air and it will cover its head. So it’s clearly seems to be communicating: “Just leave me alone. You’ve beaten me, okay? You’ve beaten me.”
And what lots of scientists, like Professor Paul Gilbert in Britain and Professor Kate Pickett and Professor Richard Wilkinson, also in Britain, have really developed is this idea that actually what human depression is, in part—not entirely, but in part—is a form of a submission gesture. It’s a way of saying, “I can’t cope with this anymore,” right. Particularly people who feel th...
For the full transcript, check out
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Is Everything You Know About Depression Wrong? With Johann Hari | Feel Better Live More Podcast

RE-RELEASE: This episode originally aired last year as a two-part episode.

CAUTION ADVISED: this podcast contains swearing and themes of an adult nature.

For the past few decades, almost every year, levels of depression and anxiety have increased in Britain and across the Western world. But why? One of the most important voices in this area, Johann Hari, went on a forty-thousand-mile journey across the world to interview the leading experts about what causes depression and anxiety, and what solves them. He shares the fascinating findings of his research in this week’s podcast. Johann explains that although we have been told a story that drugs are the solution to depression and anxiety, in many cases, the cause is not in our biology but in the way we live.

Johann argues that being depressed or anxious does not mean that you are crazy, weak or broken, rather, that your natural psychological needs are not being met. And it’s hardly surprising – we are the loneliest society there has ever been. We discuss how loneliness affects us, how social prescribing can transform lives, the role trauma plays and how shame is both physically and emotionally destructive. Johann believes that societal values have been corrupted and explains the effect that this is having on our health. We talk about the role of the workplace and how having autonomy and choices can reduce the likelihood of depression and anxiety. Johann goes on to share the incredible heart-warming story of the people from Berlin district called Kotti – a story of how an unlikely community was borne out of desperation and the unbelievable transformations that occurred for the whole community as a result of it. Finally, Johann shares some truly inspirational top tips. This really is a captivating and incredibly important conversation – I hope you enjoy it!

Show notes available at

Find out more about Johann:
Website -
Facebook -
Instagram -
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Johann’s books:
Lost Connections: Why You’re Depressed and How to Find Hope -
Chasing the Scream: The Search for the Truth About Addiction -

Related FBLM podcasts:
#37 How Our Childhood Shapes Every Aspect of Our Health with Dr. Gabor Maté
#42 - Parkrun – A Celebration of Community with Nick Pearson

#feelbetterlivemore #johannhari #depression
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If You're Depressed Listen To This | Johann Hari | Inspirational Speech

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Everything you think you know about addiction is wrong | Johann Hari

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What really causes addiction — to everything from cocaine to smart-phones? And how can we overcome it? Johann Hari has seen our current methods fail firsthand, as he has watched loved ones struggle to manage their addictions. He started to wonder why we treat addicts the way we do — and if there might be a better way. As he shares in this deeply personal talk, his questions took him around the world, and unearthed some surprising and hopeful ways of thinking about an age-old problem.

The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. You're welcome to link to or embed these videos, forward them to others and share these ideas with people you know.

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What the best science really says about depression | Johann Hari | Big Think

What the best science really says about depression
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For almost the past 100 years, some mental health professionals have told us that depression is purely caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain. However, there's a much more realistic theory that depression happens due to an imbalance happening outside of your cranium. Journalist and author Johann Hari believes that while for some people it is a chemical imbalance, for many people suffering from depression, the cause stems from societal issues. Hari offers some staggering statistics showing that antidepressants seem to be doing much more harm than good — among them, that one out of every four middle-aged women in the United States is taking a chemical antidepressant in any given year. If we want to get rid of modern-day depression, he says, we have to change society. Johann Hari's new book is Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression – and the Unexpected Solutions.
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JOHANN HARI:

Johann Hari is the New York Times bestselling author of Chasing the Scream, which is being adapted into a feature film. He was twice named Newspaper Journalist of the Year by Amnesty International UK. He has written for many of the world’s leading newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, Le Monde, the Guardian, the Los Angeles Times, the New Republic, the Nation, Slate, El Mundo, and the Sydney Morning Herald. He was a lead op-ed columnist for the Independent, one of Britain’s leading newspapers, for nine years. He is a regular panelist on HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher. His TED talk, “Everything You Think You Know About Addiction Is Wrong,” has more than 20 million views.
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TRANSCRIPT:

Johann Hari: I kept learning intellectually about what causes depression and anxiety.

And that it’s much deeper than the story I’d been told by my doctor—that it’s just a missing chemical in your brain.

But I think it really emotionally fell into place when I went and met an incredible South African psychiatrist called Derek Summerfield. So Derek was in Cambodia when chemical antidepressants were first introduced there. And the Cambodian doctors didn’t know what they were, right? They’d never heard of it. So he explained it to them and they said, “Oh, we don’t need them. We’ve already got antidepressants.”

And Derek said what do you mean?

He thought they were going to talk about some kind of herbal remedy or something.

Instead they told him a story. There was a farmer in their community who one day, a rice farmer, who one day had stood on a landmine and had his leg blown off. And so they gave him an artificial limb and he went back to work in the fields. But it’s apparently very painful to work in water when you’ve got an artificial limb. And I imagine it was quite traumatic—He’s going back to the fields where he was blown up.

And he started crying all day. He didn’t want to get out of bed. Classic depression, right? And so they said to Derek, “Well we gave him an antidepressant.” Derek said what did you do? They explained that they sat with him, they listened to his problems, they realized that his pain made sense. He was depressed for perfectly good reasons. They figured if we bought him a cow he could become a dairy farmer then he wouldn’t be so depressed. They bought him a cow. Within a few weeks his crying stopped, he felt fine.

They said to Derek, “You see, Doctor, that cow was an antidepressant.” Now if you’ve been raised to think about depression the way that we’ve been indoctrinated to, that it’s just the result of – there are real biological factors but it’s just the result of a chemical imbalance in your brain—that sounds like a joke, a bad joke. They gave the guy a cow as an antidepressant and he stopped being depressed?

But what those Cambodian doctors knew intuitively is what the World Health Organization has been trying to tell us for years. Depression is a response to things going wrong deep in our lives and our environments. Our pain makes sense.

As the World Health Organization put it, mental health is produced socially. It’s a social indicator. It requires social as well as individual solutions. It requires social change, right?

Now that is a very different way of thinking about depression and anxiety but it happens to fit with the best scientific evidence.

And it really required me to reassess how I’d felt about my own pain and how I tried to deal it unsuccessfully and open up a whole different way...

Read the full transcript at

The Rising Depression and Anxiety Crisis with Johann Hari

Bestselling author Johann Hari discovered that, in reality, depression and anxiety are caused largely by crucial changes in the way we are living. Using vivid human stories and social science, he explains the evidence.

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Spirituality & Depression: A Conversation with author Johann Hari

With rates of depression and anxiety rising — skyrocketing during the pandemic — we’re all looking for a quick fix.But a quick fix doesn’t get to the root of the problem as author Johann Hari details in his book, Lost Connections: Why You’re Depressed and How to Find Hope. 

Suffering from depression for most of his life, Hari set out to study why so many are struggling and what he came up with, his 9 causes of depression, is spot-on. 

This is a topic that’s close to my heart - something I’ve spoken and written about for years and I couldn’t be happier to have this discussion with Johann. We talk about our struggles with depression, habits you can build to lessen the severity when the sadness strikes and how society and government contributes to people’s despair.

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Rethinking Depression with Johann Hari | Rich Roll Podcast Clips

Johann Hari has written for The NY Times & The LA Times, and is the author of 'Chasing The Scream' and 'Lost Connections'. This is an excerpt from our conversation about the causes and solutions for addiction and depression.
Enjoy!

Check out the full conversation if you haven’t already.
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Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression with Johann Hari | Feel Better Live More Podcast

CAUTION ADVISED: this podcast contains swearing and themes of an adult nature.

For the past few decades, almost every year, levels of depression and anxiety have increased in Britain and across the Western world. But why? One of the most important voices in this area, Johann Hari, went on a forty-thousand-mile journey across the world to interview the leading experts about what causes depression and anxiety, and what solves them. He shares the fascinating findings of his research in this podcast.

Johann explains that although we have been told a story that drugs are the solution to depression and anxiety, in many cases, the cause is not in our biology but in the way we live. He argues that being depressed or anxious does not mean that you are crazy, weak or broken, rather, that your natural psychological needs are not being met. And it’s hardly surprising - we are the loneliest society there has ever been. We discuss how loneliness affects us and how social prescribing can transform lives. We delve into the role trauma plays and how shame is both physically and emotionally destructive. Johann believes that societal values have been corrupted and explains the effect that this is having on our health. We talk about the role of the workplace and how having autonomy and choices can reduce the likelihood of depression and anxiety.

Johann shares the heart-warming story of how an unlikely community in Berlin's Kotti district was borne out of desperation and the unbelievable transformations that occurred for the whole community as a result of it. We discuss how our isolated lives mean that our basic psychological needs are not being met and how this is impacting suicide rates, particularly for white males. We delve into how a dramatic change in societal ideals is leading to more unhappiness. Also, how people are turning to screens, social media and other addictions to fulfill their unmet needs. Finally, Johann shares some truly inspirational top tips. This really is a captivating and incredibly important conversation – I hope you enjoy it! My new book, ‘The Stress Solution’ contains lots of practical solutions to help you with many of the issues discussed in this podcast. It is available to order on Amazon now.

Show notes available at

Find out more about Johann:
Website -
Facebook -
Instagram -
Twitter -

Johann’s books:
Lost Connections: Why You’re Depressed and How to Find Hope -
Chasing the Scream: The Search for the Truth About Addiction -

#feelbetterlivemore #johannhari #depression
------
Find Dr Chatterjee’s 4 Pillars of Health in The 4 Pillar Plan available via
The US version, How to Make Disease Disappear is available via
Order Dr Chatterjee’s book The Stress Solution
Dr Chatterjee’s NEW book Feel Better in 5 is out now -

-----
Listen to all previous podcast episodes on or via these podcast platforms by searching for 'Feel Better, Live More'.

iTunes -
Acast -
Stitcher -
Overcast -

-----
Follow Dr Chatterjee at:
Website:
Facebook:
Twitter:
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DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.
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The Truth About Depression (featuring Johann Hari)

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Johann Hari, Lost Connections (w/ Andrew Sullivan)

Johann Hari discusses his book, Lost Connections with Andrew Sullivan on 1/31/18.

Hari, author of Chasing the Scream, changed the terms of the debate about addiction with his influential TED talk, “Everything You Think You Know About Addiction Is Wrong.” In his second book he uses his own experience with depression and anti-depressant medication as the starting point for a critique of current chemical-imbalance theories of mental illness. Asking if the growing levels of depression could be related to the conditions we live in, Hari talked to social scientists as well as psychologists. Finding a link between depression and external factors such as loneliness, work-based dissatisfaction, and other discontents of consumer culture, he reports from around the world on unconventional treatments—community volunteer projects instead of pills, non-hierarchical workplaces—that improve mental health by fostering a sense of empowerment.

Hari is in conversation with Andrew Sullivan, former editor of The New Republic, and the author or editor of six books.



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Depression and the Secret to Happiness | Johann Hari

Society is making us depressed but it’s okay Johann Hari has found the secret to happiness ????

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Johann Hari challenges the way we think about depression | The TED Interview

Author Johann Hari offers a deeply personal and surprisingly uplifting perspective on how to tackle depression.

The TED Audio Collective videos may be used for non-commercial purposes under a Creative Commons License, Attribution–Non Commercial–No Derivatives (or the CC BY – NC – ND 4.0 International) and in accordance with our TED Talks Usage Policy ( For more information on using TED for commercial purposes (e.g. employee learning, in a film or online course), please submit a Media Request at

Johann Hari - Depression: The Real Causes (& Unexpected Solutions)

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What really causes depression and anxiety – and how can we really solve them? In this talk, award winning journalist Johann Hari will discuss his recent 40,000-mile journey across the world, where he interviewed social scientists uncovering evidence that depression and anxiety are not caused by a chemical imbalance in our brains – but rather, are largely caused by key problems with the way we live today.

Hari’s journey took him from an Amish community in Indiana, to a mind-blowing series of experiments in Baltimore, to an uprising in Berlin. Along the way, he uncovered nine real causes of depression and anxiety, which eventually led him to the scientists who are discovering seven very different solutions – ones that work.

Johann Hari is a New York Times best-selling author. His book ‘Chasing the Scream’ has been translated into 15 languages and is currently being adapted into a major Hollywood film, and into a non-fiction documentary series.

With over 20 million views, he is one of the most-watched TED speakers of all time. He has written for the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Guardian, and was twice named ‘National Newspaper Journalist of the Year’ by Amnesty International.

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If You're DEPRESSED Listen THIS- Johann Hari #shorts #viral

If You're DEPRESSED Listen THIS- Johann Hari #shorts #viral

Johann Eduard Hari is a British-Swiss writer and journalist. He has written for publications including The Independent and The Huffington Post, and has written books on the topics of depression, the war on drugs, and the British monarchy. 

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Johann Hari - The Antidote for Loneliness

Did you know being acutely lonely is as bad for your health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day? In this video, author Johann Hari outlines the importance of feeling connected to those around us.

Lost Connections Book Review || Johann Hari

Matthew gives his review and recommendation for Lost Connections, a book about depression and anxiety. If you struggle with depression and anxiety, is this the book for you? Check out the video to find out.

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Johann Hari discusses the real causes of depression

Journalist and author Johann Hari, who took antidepressants for 13 years, discusses his theories around what causes the mental illness - leading to columnist Nina Myscow revealing she once had to rebuild her life after she had a mental breakdown that left her in a nursing home.

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Depression and anxiety: How inequality is driving the mental health crisis | Johann Hari

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Expressions like feeling down or feeling low are more literal than we think, says Lost Connections author Johann Hari. A 30-year field study of wild African baboons by the incredible Stanford University professor Robert Sapolsky has shown that there is a remarkable relationship between depression, anxiety, and social hierarchies. Male baboons—who live in a very strict pecking order—suffer the most psychological stress when their social status is insecure, or when they are on the bottom rung, looking up at the luxuries of others. Does it sound familiar yet? If you live in the United States... we’re at the greatest levels of inequality since the 1920s, says Hari. There’s a few people at the very top, there’s a kind of precarious middle, and there’s a huge and swelling bottom. It's no coincidence that mental health gets poorer as the wealth gap continues to widen: depression and anxiety are socioeconomic diseases. The silver lining is that this relationship has been discovered. Could an economic revolution end the depression epidemic? And, most curiously, what can we learn from the Amish on this front? Johann Hari is the author of Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression – and the Unexpected Solutions.

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JOHANN HARI

Johann Hari is the New York Times bestselling author of Chasing the Scream, which is being adapted into a feature film. He was twice named Newspaper Journalist of the Year by Amnesty International UK. He has written for many of the world’s leading newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, Le Monde, the Guardian, the Los Angeles Times, the New Republic, the Nation, Slate, El Mundo, and the Sydney Morning Herald. He was a lead op-ed columnist for the Independent, one of Britain’s leading newspapers, for nine years. He is a regular panelist on HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher. His TED talk, “Everything You Think You Know About Addiction Is Wrong,” has more than 20 million views.
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TRANSCRIPT:

Johann Hari: When I feel depressed, like loads of people I say, “I feel down,” right?


And as I was learning about the causes of depression and anxiety for my book 'Lost Connections' I started to realize—I don’t think that’s a metaphor. There’s this amazing professor at Stanford called Robert Sapolsky who, in his early twenties, went to live with a troop of baboons in Kenya. And it was his job to figure out: when are baboons most stressed out?


So his job was to hit them with little tranquilizer darts and then take a blood test and measure something called cortisol, which is a hormone that baboons and us release when we’re stressed. And baboons live in this hierarchy—so the females don’t, interestingly—but the men live in a very strict hierarchy. So if there’s 30 men, number one knows he’s above number two. Number two knows he’s above number three. Number 12 knows he’s above number 13. And that really determines a lot; it determines who you get to have sex with, it determines what you get to eat, it determines whether you get to sit in the shade or you’re pushed out into the heat. So really it's significant where you are in the hierarchy.


And what Professor Sapolsky found is that baboons are most stressed in two situations. One is when their status is insecure. So if you’re the top guy and someone’s circling which comes for you, you will be massively stressed.


And the other situation is when you feel you’re at the bottom of the hierarchy, you’ve been kind of humiliated. And what Professor Sapolsky noticed—and then it was later developed by other scientists—is, when you feel you’ve been pushed to the bottom, what you do is you show something called a submission gesture.


So you, baboons will raise— I say “you,” I assume no baboons are watching this, maybe they are—a baboon will put its body down physically or put it’s head down or put its bottom in the air and it will cover its head. So it’s clearly seems to be communicating: “Just leave me alone. You’ve beaten me, okay? You’ve beaten me.”


And what lots of scientists, like Professor Paul Gilbert in Britain and Professor Kate Pickett and Professor Richard Wilkinson, also in Britain, have really developed is this idea that actually what human depression is, in part—not entirely, but in part—is a form of a submission gesture. It’s a way of saying, “I can’t cope with this anymore,” right. Particularly people who feel th...

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