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This could be why you're depressed or anxious | Johann Hari

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This could be why you're depressed or anxious | Johann Hari

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In a moving talk, journalist Johann Hari shares fresh insights on the causes of depression and anxiety from experts around the world -- as well as some exciting emerging solutions. If you're depressed or anxious, you're not weak and you're not crazy -- you're a human being with unmet needs, Hari says.

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Johann Hari discusses the real causes of depression

Journalist and author Johann Hari, who took antidepressants for 13 years, discusses his theories around what causes the mental illness - leading to columnist Nina Myscow revealing she once had to rebuild her life after she had a mental breakdown that left her in a nursing home.

Jeremy Vine is on television every weekday at 9:15am until 11:15am on Channel 5. To watch full episodes, visit

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The one factor causing depression and anxiety in the workplace | Johann Hari

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Expressions like feeling down or feeling low are more literal than we think, says Lost Connections author Johann Hari. A 30-year field study of wild African baboons by the incredible Stanford University professor Robert Sapolsky has shown that there is a remarkable relationship between depression, anxiety, and social hierarchies. Male baboons—who live in a very strict pecking order—suffer the most psychological stress when their social status is insecure, or when they are on the bottom rung, looking up at the luxuries of others. Does it sound familiar yet? If you live in the United States... we’re at the greatest levels of inequality since the 1920s, says Hari. There’s a few people at the very top, there’s a kind of precarious middle, and there’s a huge and swelling bottom. It's no coincidence that mental health gets poorer as the wealth gap continues to widen: depression and anxiety are socioeconomic diseases. The silver lining is that this relationship has been discovered. Could an economic revolution end the depression epidemic? And, most curiously, what can we learn from the Amish on this front? Johann Hari is the author of Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression – and the Unexpected Solutions.

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JOHANN HARI

Johann Hari is the New York Times bestselling author of Chasing the Scream, which is being adapted into a feature film. He was twice named Newspaper Journalist of the Year by Amnesty International UK. He has written for many of the world’s leading newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, Le Monde, the Guardian, the Los Angeles Times, the New Republic, the Nation, Slate, El Mundo, and the Sydney Morning Herald. He was a lead op-ed columnist for the Independent, one of Britain’s leading newspapers, for nine years. He is a regular panelist on HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher. His TED talk, “Everything You Think You Know About Addiction Is Wrong,” has more than 20 million views.







 


 

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TRANSCRIPT:

Johann Hari: When I feel depressed, like loads of people I say, “I feel down,” right?


And as I was learning about the causes of depression and anxiety for my book 'Lost Connections' I started to realize—I don’t think that’s a metaphor. There’s this amazing professor at Stanford called Robert Sapolsky who, in his early twenties, went to live with a troop of baboons in Kenya. And it was his job to figure out: when are baboons most stressed out?


So his job was to hit them with little tranquilizer darts and then take a blood test and measure something called cortisol, which is a hormone that baboons and us release when we’re stressed. And baboons live in this hierarchy—so the females don’t, interestingly—but the men live in a very strict hierarchy. So if there’s 30 men, number one knows he’s above number two. Number two knows he’s above number three. Number 12 knows he’s above number 13. And that really determines a lot; it determines who you get to have sex with, it determines what you get to eat, it determines whether you get to sit in the shade or you’re pushed out into the heat. So really it's significant where you are in the hierarchy.


And what Professor Sapolsky found is that baboons are most stressed in two situations. One is when their status is insecure. So if you’re the top guy and someone’s circling which comes for you, you will be massively stressed.


And the other situation is when you feel you’re at the bottom of the hierarchy, you’ve been kind of humiliated. And what Professor Sapolsky noticed—and then it was later developed by other scientists—is, when you feel you’ve been pushed to the bottom, what you do is you show something called a submission gesture.


So you, baboons will raise— I say “you,” I assume no baboons are watching this, maybe they are—a baboon will put its body down physically or put it’s head down or put its bottom in the air and it will cover its head. So it’s clearly seems to be communicating: “Just leave me alone. You’ve beaten me, okay? You’ve beaten me.”


And what lots of scientists, like Professor Paul Gilbert in Britain and Professor Kate Pickett and Professor Richard Wilkinson, also in Britain, have really developed is this idea that actually what human depression is, in part—not entirely, but in part—is a form of a submission gesture. It’s a way of saying, “I can’t cope with this anymore,” right. Particularly people who feel th...

For the full transcript, check out
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Johann Hari - The Antidote for Loneliness

Did you know being acutely lonely is as bad for your health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day? In this video, author Johann Hari outlines the importance of feeling connected to those around us.
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What the best science really says about depression | Johann Hari | Big Think

What the best science really says about depression
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For almost the past 100 years, some mental health professionals have told us that depression is purely caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain. However, there's a much more realistic theory that depression happens due to an imbalance happening outside of your cranium. Journalist and author Johann Hari believes that while for some people it is a chemical imbalance, for many people suffering from depression, the cause stems from societal issues. Hari offers some staggering statistics showing that antidepressants seem to be doing much more harm than good — among them, that one out of every four middle-aged women in the United States is taking a chemical antidepressant in any given year. If we want to get rid of modern-day depression, he says, we have to change society. Johann Hari's new book is Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression – and the Unexpected Solutions.
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JOHANN HARI:

Johann Hari is the New York Times bestselling author of Chasing the Scream, which is being adapted into a feature film. He was twice named Newspaper Journalist of the Year by Amnesty International UK. He has written for many of the world’s leading newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, Le Monde, the Guardian, the Los Angeles Times, the New Republic, the Nation, Slate, El Mundo, and the Sydney Morning Herald. He was a lead op-ed columnist for the Independent, one of Britain’s leading newspapers, for nine years. He is a regular panelist on HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher. His TED talk, “Everything You Think You Know About Addiction Is Wrong,” has more than 20 million views.
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TRANSCRIPT:

Johann Hari: I kept learning intellectually about what causes depression and anxiety.

And that it’s much deeper than the story I’d been told by my doctor—that it’s just a missing chemical in your brain.

But I think it really emotionally fell into place when I went and met an incredible South African psychiatrist called Derek Summerfield. So Derek was in Cambodia when chemical antidepressants were first introduced there. And the Cambodian doctors didn’t know what they were, right? They’d never heard of it. So he explained it to them and they said, “Oh, we don’t need them. We’ve already got antidepressants.”

And Derek said what do you mean?

He thought they were going to talk about some kind of herbal remedy or something.

Instead they told him a story. There was a farmer in their community who one day, a rice farmer, who one day had stood on a landmine and had his leg blown off. And so they gave him an artificial limb and he went back to work in the fields. But it’s apparently very painful to work in water when you’ve got an artificial limb. And I imagine it was quite traumatic—He’s going back to the fields where he was blown up.

And he started crying all day. He didn’t want to get out of bed. Classic depression, right? And so they said to Derek, “Well we gave him an antidepressant.” Derek said what did you do? They explained that they sat with him, they listened to his problems, they realized that his pain made sense. He was depressed for perfectly good reasons. They figured if we bought him a cow he could become a dairy farmer then he wouldn’t be so depressed. They bought him a cow. Within a few weeks his crying stopped, he felt fine.

They said to Derek, “You see, Doctor, that cow was an antidepressant.” Now if you’ve been raised to think about depression the way that we’ve been indoctrinated to, that it’s just the result of – there are real biological factors but it’s just the result of a chemical imbalance in your brain—that sounds like a joke, a bad joke. They gave the guy a cow as an antidepressant and he stopped being depressed?

But what those Cambodian doctors knew intuitively is what the World Health Organization has been trying to tell us for years. Depression is a response to things going wrong deep in our lives and our environments. Our pain makes sense.

As the World Health Organization put it, mental health is produced socially. It’s a social indicator. It requires social as well as individual solutions. It requires social change, right?

Now that is a very different way of thinking about depression and anxiety but it happens to fit with the best scientific evidence.

And it really required me to reassess how I’d felt about my own pain and how I tried to deal it unsuccessfully and open up a whole different way...

Read the full transcript at

Depression and the Secret to Happiness | Johann Hari

Society is making us depressed but it’s okay Johann Hari has found the secret to happiness ????

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If you’ve ever struggled with anxiety or depression, then do we have the Lost Connections show for you!

Today I’ll be talking with Johann Hari, award-winning journalist, the best-selling author of at least seven books including Chasing the Scream Ted-Talker Extraordinaire (his talk on connection has been viewed over 25 million times), and the author of a brilliant new book on Depression, The Lost Connections.

And that’s just what I want to talk with him about today, about uncovering the real causes of depression and the unexpected solutions.

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MORE ON JOHANN HARI:

Johann Hari is a New York Times best-selling author. His book ‘Chasing the Scream: the First and Last Days of the War on Drugs’ has been translated into 15 languages and is currently being adapted into a major Hollywood film, and into a non-fiction documentary series.

He is one of the most-viewed TED talkers of all time: his talk, ‘Everything You Think You Know About Addiction is Wrong’, has (along with the animation based on it) been viewed more than 20 million times.

He has written over the past seven years for some of the world’s leading newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Guardian, the Spectator, Le Monde Diplomatique, the Melbourne Age, and Politico. He has also appeared on leading TV shows, including HBO’s Realtime With Bill Maher.

He was twice named ‘National Newspaper Journalist of the Year’ by Amnesty International. He has also been named ‘Cultural Commentator of the Year’ and ‘Environmental Commentator of the Year’ at the Comment Awards.

He lives half the year in London, and spends the other half of the year traveling to research his books.
To read about what Johann is working on now, click here.

Key Topics:
* How did Johann Hari end up clinically depressed?
* What was really going on?
* How long was he on anti-depressants?
* How can a cow literally be a type of anti-depressant???
* How did he begin a 40,000 mile quest to understand stress and depression?
* What did he learn about why people are feeling so depressed and severely anxious?
* Could something other than bad brain chemistry be causing depression and anxiety?
* How have we been misinformed about what depression and anxiety really art?
* Are stress and depression really in our heads?
* Is our environment kick-starting our depression?
* What can we learn about shame and depression?
* What are the top causes of depression and anxiety?
* What are disconnections?
* What’s the importance of others in our lives?
* What’s the importance of meaningful work?
* What’s the importance of meaningful values?
* Can materialism actually cause depression?
* What can we learn about baboons and depression?
* What’s the harm in being disconnected from the “natural” world?
* What’s the importance of a hopeful future?

Everything You Think You Know About Addiction Is Wrong TedTalk Johann Hari TED Talks 720p

Depression and anxiety: How inequality is driving the mental health crisis | Johann Hari

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Expressions like feeling down or feeling low are more literal than we think, says Lost Connections author Johann Hari. A 30-year field study of wild African baboons by the incredible Stanford University professor Robert Sapolsky has shown that there is a remarkable relationship between depression, anxiety, and social hierarchies. Male baboons—who live in a very strict pecking order—suffer the most psychological stress when their social status is insecure, or when they are on the bottom rung, looking up at the luxuries of others. Does it sound familiar yet? If you live in the United States... we’re at the greatest levels of inequality since the 1920s, says Hari. There’s a few people at the very top, there’s a kind of precarious middle, and there’s a huge and swelling bottom. It's no coincidence that mental health gets poorer as the wealth gap continues to widen: depression and anxiety are socioeconomic diseases. The silver lining is that this relationship has been discovered. Could an economic revolution end the depression epidemic? And, most curiously, what can we learn from the Amish on this front? Johann Hari is the author of Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression – and the Unexpected Solutions.

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JOHANN HARI

Johann Hari is the New York Times bestselling author of Chasing the Scream, which is being adapted into a feature film. He was twice named Newspaper Journalist of the Year by Amnesty International UK. He has written for many of the world’s leading newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, Le Monde, the Guardian, the Los Angeles Times, the New Republic, the Nation, Slate, El Mundo, and the Sydney Morning Herald. He was a lead op-ed columnist for the Independent, one of Britain’s leading newspapers, for nine years. He is a regular panelist on HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher. His TED talk, “Everything You Think You Know About Addiction Is Wrong,” has more than 20 million views.







 


 

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TRANSCRIPT:

Johann Hari: When I feel depressed, like loads of people I say, “I feel down,” right?


And as I was learning about the causes of depression and anxiety for my book 'Lost Connections' I started to realize—I don’t think that’s a metaphor. There’s this amazing professor at Stanford called Robert Sapolsky who, in his early twenties, went to live with a troop of baboons in Kenya. And it was his job to figure out: when are baboons most stressed out?


So his job was to hit them with little tranquilizer darts and then take a blood test and measure something called cortisol, which is a hormone that baboons and us release when we’re stressed. And baboons live in this hierarchy—so the females don’t, interestingly—but the men live in a very strict hierarchy. So if there’s 30 men, number one knows he’s above number two. Number two knows he’s above number three. Number 12 knows he’s above number 13. And that really determines a lot; it determines who you get to have sex with, it determines what you get to eat, it determines whether you get to sit in the shade or you’re pushed out into the heat. So really it's significant where you are in the hierarchy.


And what Professor Sapolsky found is that baboons are most stressed in two situations. One is when their status is insecure. So if you’re the top guy and someone’s circling which comes for you, you will be massively stressed.


And the other situation is when you feel you’re at the bottom of the hierarchy, you’ve been kind of humiliated. And what Professor Sapolsky noticed—and then it was later developed by other scientists—is, when you feel you’ve been pushed to the bottom, what you do is you show something called a submission gesture.


So you, baboons will raise— I say “you,” I assume no baboons are watching this, maybe they are—a baboon will put its body down physically or put it’s head down or put its bottom in the air and it will cover its head. So it’s clearly seems to be communicating: “Just leave me alone. You’ve beaten me, okay? You’ve beaten me.”


And what lots of scientists, like Professor Paul Gilbert in Britain and Professor Kate Pickett and Professor Richard Wilkinson, also in Britain, have really developed is this idea that actually what human depression is, in part—not entirely, but in part—is a form of a submission gesture. It’s a way of saying, “I can’t cope with this anymore,” right. Particularly people who feel th...

For the full transcript, check out

Johann Hari - A Story of Connection

Writer Johann Hari recounts a moving tale that taught him the power of connection better than any research could.
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Catastrophizing-How to stop making yourself depressed and anxious (Cognitive Distortion) Skill #6

Catastrophizing is a Thinking Error (aka Cognitive Distortion) that makes you anxious, depressed, and unmotivated.
In this video, I explain what catastrophizing is, how to stop, and what to do instead.

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Therapy in a Nutshell, and the information provided by Emma McAdam, is solely intended for informational and entertainment purposes and is not a substitute for advice, diagnosis, or treatment regarding medical or mental health conditions. Although Emma McAdam is a licensed marriage and family therapist, the views expressed on this site or any related content should not be taken for medical or psychiatric advice. Always consult your physician before making any decisions related to your physical or mental health.

If you are in crisis please contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at: or 1-800-273-TALK (8255), or your local emergency services.
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People With Anxiety & Depression Share Advice For Anyone Who's Struggling | Soul Stories

We asked people living with depression and anxiety to share some advice for anyone who may also be struggling with a mental health condition.

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Is neoliberalism making us depressed and anxious? Johann Hari explains

This event was recorded at Houseman’s bookshop on 11th April, 2018. To get the audiobook or physical book Johann is discussing here, go to

Loneliness kills: How to fight depression with social support | Johann Hari

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How Important Relationships Can Decrease Anxiety & Depression | Dr. Maxine Ruddock | TEDxBoggyCreek

When we are socially connected we feel less depressed or anxious, we feel better about ourselves, and have better overall mental and physical health. Although many people have hundreds or thousands of social connections, that is often not enough. As a matter of fact, more and more Baby Boomers, Millennials and GenZs are reporting that they feel lonely or disconnected from others. Join Clinical Psychologist and Life Coach Dr. Max as she talks about the alarming decline in social connectedness, the spiritual, physical and emotional benefits of developing positive relationships, and simple ways to increase meaningful relationships. Dr Maxine Ruddock is a clinical Psychologist who has been
successfully coaching and counseling people for many years.
She is also the clinical director at Comprehensive Psychological and Assessment Services where she manages the development of the mental health programs, provides consultation to upper level clinicians regarding especially challenging clinical cases and trains Masters and Doctorate level students. Dr Ruddock is passionate about helping people identify and live their created purpose and utilizes proven strategies for helping them to do so. She is especially passionate about working with women and specializes in women’s issues. disabilities. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at
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Anxiety and Depression: What's the Difference?

Anxiety and depression may be confusing, especially if a person has both. These mental disorders can be co-morbid. Someone with depression can have anxiety symptoms, and vice versa. So, what's the difference between anxiety and depression?

If you’re looking for affordable and convenient therapy to deal with stress, anxiety, or depression, please check out our sponsor BetterHelp:



#depression #anxiety #psych2go

Suggested Videos:

5 Types of Depressive Disorders


10 Things Depression Makes Us Do


The 5 Major Anxiety Disorders


Credits
Script Writer: Michelle Gaston
Script Editor & VO: Lily Hu
Animator: Annie Bearden
YouTube Manager: Cindy Cheong

References

Medical News Today. (2018). What Causes Anxiety. Retrieved from:

Medical News Today. (2017). What is depression and what can I do about it. Retrieved from:

Johann Hari: Lost Connections

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Johann Hari joins Zach Rhoads for a conversation about his new book, Lost Connections.

Hari embarked on an epic journey around the world, in preparation for the book, to look for answers-- not answers about addiction (per his last book, Chasing The Scream). In this journey-- which he describes in this talk-- Hari discovers the truth about what causes mental illnesses like anxiety and depression.

After traveling the world, sifting through countless academic journals, and speaking to the world's leading authorities on the issue, Johann has arrived at an unexpected conclusion: depression is not just a problem for western medicine-- it is an issue in the purview of social science. Johann is now aware of nine primary social causes of depression, and seven social solutions-- keys to living a flourishing life.

**********

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@johanhari101

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This Might Be Why You're Unhappy

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I decided to make this piece to talk about something I've struggled with quite a bit this year. It has to do with my ego, and although I'm not proud of this, just being honest about where I'm at and making this was really helpful.

Comparison is the thief of joy, were words from Theodore Roosevelt and they feel very relevant in a competitive world.

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How to spot unhealthy ideas that stop true happiness | Johann Hari | Big Think

How to spot unhealthy ideas that stop true happiness
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Author and journalist Johann Hari thinks that modern life sets you up to be depressed.

The constant insecurity we get from heavy marketing ruins true human connections, and doesn't lead to any growth for society as a whole.

But there's hope.
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JOHANN HARI:

Johann Hari is the New York Times bestselling author of Chasing the Scream, which is being adapted into a feature film. He was twice named Newspaper Journalist of the Year by Amnesty International UK. He has written for many of the world’s leading newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, Le Monde, the Guardian, the Los Angeles Times, the New Republic, the Nation, Slate, El Mundo, and the Sydney Morning Herald. He was a lead op-ed columnist for the Independent, one of Britain’s leading newspapers, for nine years. He is a regular panelist on HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher. His TED talk, “Everything You Think You Know About Addiction Is Wrong,” has more than 20 million views.
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TRANSCRIPT:

Johann Hari: Of the nine causes of depression and anxiety I learned about for my book Lost Connections, there were a few that were really challenging for me because I realized how much I recognized them in myself. So one of the hardest – I have to tell you a story about something else first, but when I was, in 2009 on Christmas Eve—it makes it even sadder that this story happened on Christmas Eve. So I use to live on junk food. I used to eat appallingly.

And on Christmas Eve 2009 I went into my local KFC at lunchtime and I turned up and I gave my order—which is so disgusting I won’t even repeat it.

And the guy behind the counter said “Oh Johann, I’m so glad you’re here! Wait a minute.”

I was like, “Okay….”

So he walked off and he came back with all the other staff and they’d bought me a massive Christmas card. And they’d written in it “To our best customer.”

And so I was looking at this and my clogged heart sank. I thought, “This isn’t even the fried chicken shop I come to the most.” It was a very unfortunate low point.

But we all know, right, junk food has taken over our diets. Not admittedly to the extreme that I was, but junk food is increasingly dominating our diets and it’s making us physically sick.

One of the things that really shocked me in the research is that there’s really good evidence that something similar has happened with our minds. Our kind of junk values have taken over our minds and they’ve made us mentally sick.

So for thousands of years now philosophers have said, if you think life is about, you know, money and status and showing off you’re going to feel terrible, right? From Confucius on down, people have been warning us of that. But weirdly nobody had actually scientifically investigated it, until an incredible man I got to know called Professor Tim Kasser who’s at Knox University in Illinois.

So Professor Kasser knew when it comes to human motivation there’s basically—to put it crudely—two kinds of human motivation, right.

Imagine you play the piano. If you play the piano in the morning because you love it and it gives you joy, that’s an intrinsic motivation. You’re not doing it to get something out of it. You’re just doing it because that thing gives you joy, right?

Okay, now imagine you play the piano not because it gives you joy, but in a dive bar to pay the rent or because your parents are really pressuring you to be a piano maestro, or to impress a man, maybe some weird piano fetishist, right? That would be an extrinsic reason to play the piano. You’re not doing it for the experience itself. You’re doing it to get something out of it. You’re doing it one removed. You’re doing it to get something out of the experience.

Now we’re all a mixture of intrinsic and extrinsic values obviously, and we change throughout our lives. But Professor Kasser discovered some really fascinating things. The first thing is, the more your life is dominated by extrinsic values—the more you’re doing things not because you think they’re important but because of how you’ll look to other people, how you’ll seem on the outside—the more likely you are to become depressed and anxious. It’s a quite significant effect that’s been found in 22 studies with depression and 14 studies with anxiety.

Now there are many reasons. I’ll give you just one. One of the things we know is that something that’s a real source of joy in human life,...

For the full transcript, check out

Lost Connections, Johann Hari. A video review

This book takes a fresh, practical look at the causes of depression which are under our control. Hari gives a hopeful checklist - things we can change or improve in our everyday lives which have been shown to influence the likelihood of depression.

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