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Travel INSIDE a Black Hole

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Travel INSIDE a Black Hole

Black holes, light speed travel, and the center of the universe!
Watch Numberphile discuss a Googol:

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All music by Jake Chudnow:

Einstein Ring (a special type of gravitational lensing):

Earth orbiting black hole (gif):

Visual distortion caused by massive gravity:

What would it be like to travel into a black hole? (text):

INTO A BLACK HOLE (with videos):

Black Hole view from behind:

Spaghettification:

Dumbhole:

more on the dumbhole:

what it would look like to approach the speed of light:

pinhole camera demo of seeing behind yourself:

More on visual changes while approaching lightspeed:

Where is the center of the universe?

Expansion layer demo:

Falling into a black hole (Realistic Ultra HD 360 VR movie) [8K]

On smartphones this video is best viewed using the youtube app. Try google cardboard on your smartphone with a VR headset for the most immersive experience (smartphone with gyro sensor required). For desktop computers try viewing in Google Chrome browser or Firefox.

If you're in a hurry, jump forward to 2:00 where it gets really interesting.

Science note: this is a real physics calculation (not simulation or rendering) of what we would actually see if we were unfortunate enough to fall into a black hole, from far away all the way up to the event horizon! Each frame is rendered at a resolution of 8K and the video plays at 60fps. Calculations are performed using my own general relativistic ray tracing and radiative transfer computer code, 'BHOSS' (Younsi et al. 2017), i.e., solving the equations of motion of light/photons (null geodesics) for a given spacetime, in this case a spinning black hole (Kerr).

For now there are no Doppler or gravitational redshifting effects for the sake of clarity. I've omitted an accretion disk and proper radiative transport of light as it distracts from the gravitational lensing of the starlight and the black hole's shadow. Including an accretion disk or even a torus calculated from a proper general relativistic magnetohydrodynamical computer simulation of gas falling onto a black hole is also possible and I may do this in the future.

In this movie the black hole is spinning rapidly (almost at the maximum possible rate). The starfield is taken from real observational data. The movie starts one thousand gravitational radii away from the black hole and ends at the event horizon, where eventually all light focuses into a single point and vanishes. Try looking around as you approach, or you'll miss it!

This VR movie was specially-created to feature in the Einstein Inside exhibition touring Germany, where it was first shown in November and December at the Goethe University of Frankfurt.
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A Journey into a Black Hole

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Many Space Fans have been asking for more information about black holes, specifically, what would it be like to go inside one?

Andrew Hamilton of the University of Colorado made this amazing animation and I wrote a script around it.


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Touch the sky: Iambic^2
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What Would Happen If You Traveled Through A Black Hole

Science fiction films have long depicted black holes as portals through space and time or gateways to other dimensions. And now, physicists have found that black holes might be suitable for hyperspace travel after all.

Following is a transcript of the video:

Black holes skirt the line between science fiction and science fact. On the one hand, scientists have seen real black holes in action, consuming unsuspecting stars that pass too close. But where reality ends and fiction takes over is at the edge of a black hole – a place called the event horizon, where no spacecraft has ever gone.

So, whatever happens beyond that boundary, inside of a black hole, is anyone’s guess. Scientists agree that if you travel far enough into a black hole, gravity will eventually become so strong that it kills anything in its path. But sci-fi films are more optimistic, depicting black holes as portals through space and time or gateways to other dimensions. And it turns out, some scientists now think the sci-fi buffs may be onto something. Black holes might be suitable for hyperspace travel, after all; it just takes the right kind of black hole.

At the center of every black hole is a point of infinite density, called a singularity. It’s what gives black holes their strong gravitational pull. And for decades, scientists thought singularities were all the same, so anything that passed the event horizon would be destroyed the same way: by being stretched and pulled like an infinitely long piece of spaghetti.

But that all changed in the early 1990s when different research teams in Canada and the US discovered a second singularity called a “mass inflation singularity.” It still has a strong gravitational pull, but it would only stretch you by a finite amount, and potentially NOT kill you in the process, meaning, you might survive the trip through a black hole. More specifically, through a large, rotating black hole, which is where these types of singularities exist.

Now, astronomers obviously can’t travel through a black hole yet to test this theory. In fact, the best place to test this is at the supermassive black hole in the center of our home galaxy, the Milky Way, which is 27,000 light years away. Not conveniently close to the least.

Therefore, scientists instead run computer simulations to see what would happen if we did manage to reach an isolated, rotating black hole, and now, for the first time, a team of scientists at UMass Dartmouth and Georgia Gwinnett College has done exactly that.

Lior Burko: “You would feel a slight increase in temperature, but it would not be a dramatic increase. It’s just that you don’t have enough time to respond to the very strong forces. It would just go through you too quickly.”

He added that passing through a weak singularity is like quickly running your finger through a candle flame that’s 1,000 degrees Celsius. If you hold your finger in the flame long enough, you’ll get burned, but pass your finger through quickly, and you’ll barely feel a thing. Similarly, if you pass through a weak singularity with the right speed and momentum, and at the right time, you may not feel much at all.

As for what happens once you get through to the other side, no one really knows, but Burko has his own ideas. He says one possibility is that we’d arrive at some other remote part of our galaxy, potentially light years away from any planets or stars, but a second, and perhaps more intriguing, a possibility is that we’d arrive in a different galaxy altogether. That's if you even make it that far.

Scientists say more research is needed before we’re anywhere close to successfully traveling through a black hole. But when we are ready, one of the safest passageways might be the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy called Sagittarius A*, and it might just be our ticket out of the Milky Way.

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What Would Happen If You Traveled Through A Black Hole
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Journey into a realistic black hole

This journey into a black hole was rendered on supercomputer by John Hawley at the University of Virginia. Author of the video is Andrew Hamilton, you can see more videos of black hole simulations on his webpage

The music is by Dark Ambient project Collapsar ( - the track Into the wormhole from the album Beyond The Event Horizon

ENTER THE BLACKHOLE IN 360 - Space Engine [360 video]

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In this video, we will enter a black hole and fly around it as well. This video is in full 360.

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What's Inside A Black Hole?

What's Inside A Black Hole?
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Black holes are mysterious and bizarre objects in the universe that really have no explanation. In fact, we hardly know anything about what lies inside of a black hole. We know and understand what we see on the outside of a black hole, but we have no way of going inside one to take a look at what is really happening. Even if we sent a probe inside a black hole, it would not survive the journey, and there would be no way that the probe could transmit a signal outside once it had been sucked inside. This is because a black hole is the product of mass being squeezed together so densely, and so tightly, that it creates a gravitational pull that is so strong, that not even light can escape its grasp.

Supermassive black holes with masses millions to billions of times that of the sun are thought to lurk at the hearts of all galaxies in the universe. You may notice that when you see a photo of a spiral galaxy, such as the Milky Way, in the center of the galaxy is a giant mass of light, which many people would think looks like a massive sun.

But this is not light coming from the black hole itself. Remember, that light cannot escape the heavy gravitational pull. Instead, the light we see comes from the magnetic fields near a spinning black hole that propel electrons outward in a jet along the rotation axis. The electrons produce bright radio waves. Quasars are believed to produce their energy from massive black holes in the center of the galaxies in which the quasars are located. Because quasars are so bright, they drown out the light from all the other stars in the same galaxy.

You’re probably asking, ‘well, what’s a quasar?’ A Quasar is the short name for ‘quasi-stellar object’ and is a very highly energetic object surrounding an actively feeding Supermassive Black Hole. In more basic terms, the Supermassive Black Hole in the middle of a galaxy feeds intermittently. As it feeds, gas swirls around it at incredible speeds and forms an insanely bright hot orbiting disk. And if the black hole is swallowing a large amount of material, this feeding is accompanied by gigantic jets of gas. These are called Quasar. They are essentially fueled by the Black Holes they orbit.

What If You Fell Into a Black Hole?

What would the outcome be if you took a leap of faith straight into a black hole? We looked to Einstein and Hawking to ponder the scenario.

Say one day you were exploring space looking for a new planet for humans to inhabit, but came across a black hole and decided – why not check it out? Would you have any chance of survival? How would you get out if at all? Would you find a shortcut to another universe? Watch the video to learn about what would happen if you fell into a black hole.

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What If asks some of the most provocative hypothetical questions in science — and then tries to answer them with the help of established scientific theory and the latest research.

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Interstellar Cooper entering into the Black hole 1080p mp4

Could Black Holes Made Of Light Power Our Spaceships?

What exactly would it take to create our very own Swartzchild Kugelblitz?

Could a Dyson Sphere Harness the Full Power of the Sun? -

Read More:
Kugelblitz! Powering a Starship With a Black Hole

Interstellar flight certainly ranks among the most daunting challenges ever postulated by human civilization. The distances to even the closest stars are so stupendous that constructing even a scale model of interstellar distance is impractical. For instance, if on such a model the separation of the Earth and sun is 1 inch (2.5 centimeters), the nearest star to our solar system (Proxima Centauri) would be 4.3 miles (6.9 kilometers) away!

Kugelblitz Black Holes: Lasers & Doom

A kugelblitz black hole could theoretically be created by aiming lasers vastly more powerful than anything we have today at a single point. Logically, one could assume that turning off the lasers would ‘turn off’ the black hole? Well, that’s not quite right

What is a Dyson sphere?

In recent years, astronomers explored that possibility with a bizarre star, known to astronomers as KIC 8462852 – more popularly called Tabby’s Star for its discoverer Tabetha Boyajian. This star’s strange light was originally thought to indicate a possible Dyson sphere. That idea has been discarded, but, in 2018, other possibilities emerged, such as that of using the Gaia mission to search for Dyson spheres.
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Travel into Black Hole

NASA Captured First Ever Image of a Black Hole!

Black Holes are known to swallow everything coming in their path but that's not the end. With time they they emit enormous amounts of energy.

In 2015 Hubble Telescope captured something that shocked the entire world. It was a burst of plasma jet 260 million light years away in space coming from an unknown source. Calculations showed that the jet was travelling at 98% the speed of light.

Scientists finally concluded that they have captured a plasma burst coming from a super-massive Black Hole. Which is located inside a galaxy 260 million light-years away.

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Black Hole destroying star
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What If All The Black Holes In The Universe Collided?

What If All The Black Holes In The Universe Collided?
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Black Holes… These monstrous and seemingly voids of black space suck in everything that gets too close to them; space dust, asteroids, planets, and even entire stars. The nearest one is 1,600 light-years from us. And in the region of the Universe visible from the Earth, there are perhaps 100 billion galaxies. Each one has around 100 million stellar-mass black holes in the center, ready to devour anything that gets close enough to its event horizon. But what would happen if all the black holes in the universe collided? Keep watching to find out.

We can’t see them, and some say they might not even exist, but we know that something is there from the behavior of stars that orbit these strange phenomena. Black holes lie at the center of almost every known galaxy. Some of them are active, devouring the galaxy that surrounds it, and some are dormant. The ones that are feeding shoot out massive jets of ionized matter close to the speed of light. These are the brightest objects in the universe, and they are also the largest.

Some black holes are so big that it’s almost impossible to comprehend their size. The largest one ever found is 17 billion times the size of our sun. Everything in the Milky Way galaxy, including us, is orbiting a mostly dormant supermassive black hole called Sagittarius A. This massive giant is 4.1 million times the mass of our Sun. It’s 26,000 light-years away from us, and right now as we speak, it’s tearing apart entire star systems and eating five times the mass of the moon every year. That doesn’t sound like very much, and it’s not because Sagittarius A is now a sleeping giant that could awaken if another black hole collided with it.

We’re always learning something new about this phenomenon. Some people think that a black hole just sits where it’s at and doesn’t move, but you might be shocked to learn that’s not true. Recently a black hole was spotted in space by the Hubble telescope, it’s large bright ring of gas shining through the darkness of space, and even more surprising, it was moving. For some reason, this black hole was evicted from the center of its galaxy and right now its blasting through space at 1300 miles per second, about 2000 kilometers per second. What that means is there is a rogue black hole flying through space that is estimated to be 1 billion times more massive than our sun. It would take something massive to push this black hole from the center of its galaxy and into space at such speed… another black hole.

Black holes aren’t usually traveling through space looking for something to eat. But we now know it’s possible that somewhere from space, a rogue black hole could be heading towards our galaxy, and the collision would be epic on a cosmic scale.

There are so many black holes in the universe that it is impossible to count them, and there are even more we have not discovered.
If all of the known black holes were to collide together, it would be the end of the universe as we know it. Some of these stellar giants would be so massive that they would easily swallow smaller ones, and become even larger. And if these black holes were like ours and the ones inside the Andromeda galaxy, then you could imagine the incredible cosmic cataclysm if they all collided at once, perhaps creating a black hole so massive that it would suck in the entire universe. Entire stars would be stripped and sucked inside, planets ripped apart, collisions of planets and stars, those star collisions possibly creating more black holes. It would be a chain of cosmic destruction.

What if you Were Sent to a BLACK HOLE?

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Is Time Travel Possible?: Mind Blow (Special Edition)

***LINKS***

Buy Delorean Time Machine Parts


Anderson Institute Near-Lightspeed Travel


Time Travel Reference


Hawking's Wormholes


John Titor - Time Traveler Hoax


Wormhole Example


Einstein's Light Theory


Frame Dragging. Black holes move empty space. Coffee example.


David Deutsch - Parallel Universe Theory



The Physics Of Time Travel


Mallett's Machine


Time flows differently in different places


Time Machine Trailer


Time Travel - Journey Into Time


Rowan Atkinson Is Doctor Who


Satellite Orbiting Earth Animation


Albert Einstein Clips


Stephen Hawking's Universe


The Largest Black Holes In The Universe


Portal Gun
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INSIDE a black hole

Spoiler Alert: You will die.

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Music: Erik Satie: Gnossienne
5:50: Gymnopédie No. 1

BLACK HOLES - Full Documentary - Penetrating the Mystery of Singularities

A black hole is a place in space where gravity pulls so much that even light can not get out. The gravity is so strong because matter has been squeezed into a tiny space. This can happen when a star is dying. Because no light can get out, people can't see black holes. They are invisible. Space telescopes with special tools can help find black holes. The special tools can see how stars that are very close to black holes act differently than other stars.

How Big Are Black Holes?

Black holes can be big or small. Scientists think the smallest black holes are as small as just one atom. These black holes are very tiny but have the mass of a large mountain. Mass is the amount of matter, or stuff, in an object.

Another kind of black hole is called stellar. Its mass can be up to 20 times more than the mass of the sun. There may be many, many stellar mass black holes in Earth's galaxy. Earth's galaxy is called the Milky Way.

The largest black holes are called supermassive. These black holes have masses that are more than 1 million suns together. Scientists have found proof that every large galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its center. The supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy is called Sagittarius A. It has a mass equal to about 4 million suns and would fit inside a very large ball that could hold a few million Earths.


How Do Black Holes Form?
Scientists think the smallest black holes formed when the universe began.

Stellar black holes are made when the center of a very big star falls in upon itself, or collapses. When this happens, it causes a supernova. A supernova is an exploding star that blasts part of the star into space.

Scientists think supermassive black holes were made at the same time as the galaxy they are in.


If Black Holes Are Black, How Do Scientists Know They Are There?
A black hole can not be seen because strong gravity pulls all of the light into the middle of the black hole. But scientists can see how the strong gravity affects the stars and gas around the black hole. Scientists can study stars to find out if they are flying around, or orbiting, a black hole.

When a black hole and a star are close together, high-energy light is made. This kind of light can not be seen with human eyes. Scientists use satellites and telescopes in space to see the high-energy light.


Could a Black Hole Destroy Earth?
Black holes do not go around in space eating stars, moons and planets. Earth will not fall into a black hole because no black hole is close enough to the solar system for Earth to do that.

Even if a black hole the same mass as the sun were to take the place of the sun, Earth still would not fall in. The black hole would have the same gravity as the sun. Earth and the other planets would orbit the black hole as they orbit the sun now.

The sun will never turn into a black hole. The sun is not a big enough star to make a black hole.


How Is NASA Studying Black Holes?
NASA is using satellites and telescopes that are traveling in space to learn more about black holes. These spacecraft help scientists answer questions about the universe.

What Happens Inside A Black Hole?

We were recently wondering what would happen to you if you fall into a black hole. Julian decided to tackle this tough question based on what we know.

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What Would Happen If You Fell into a Black Hole?

“Black holes are without question some of the strangest places in the universe.”

What if you fell into a black hole?

“Here's where it starts to get bad. Tidal forces -- so named because similar gravitational forces between the moon and the Earth cause ocean tides -- increase dramatically as the distance between you and the black hole shrinks.”

What would happen to me if I fell into a black hole?

“Let's suppose that you get into your spaceship and point it straight towards the million-solar-mass black hole in the center of our galaxy.”

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Event Horizon


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How Scientists Slowed Down Time


Are We Living in a Hologram?


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What's Inside a Black Hole?

What's inside a black hole? Here are three awesome theories.

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Host, Writer, Producer: Greg Kestin

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What Happens at the Event Horizon? | Space Time | PBS Digital Studios

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