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What Apollo 11 pilot Michael Collins feared most during critical NASA mission

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What Apollo 11 pilot Michael Collins feared most during critical NASA mission

This week marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, which first landed American astronauts on the moon's surface. Of the intrepid crew, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin have tended to dominate public attention, but it was pilot Michael Collins who flew the command module to the moon -- and faced his own distinct concerns about the return trip. Science correspondent Miles O’Brien reports.

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What Apollo 11 Astronaut Michael Collins Feared Most

Fifty years ago, as Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin bounced on the moon’s surface below, Apollo 11 Command Module Pilot Michael Collins briefly disappeared behind the lunar disk, becoming the first person to experience space entirely alone. As we set our sights on the stars, space travelers will need to cope with ever longer stretches—months, years, and beyond—in the lonely environs of the cosmos. What will that take? What will that be like? How will it affect who we are? Join Michael Collins and fellow astronauts for a whirlwind journey boldly going where only a handful of humans have gone before.

The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

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Michael Collins, Apollo 11 astronaut - BBC HARDtalk

This year marks the 50th anniversary of one of the most remarkable feats of exploration in the history of humankind, which landed men on the moon. While Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were setting foot on the moon’s surface, Michael Collins was piloting the command module which got them all home. In a special edition of HARDtalk, Stephen Sackur spoke to Michael Collins at his home in Florida. How does he reflect on the significance of that extraordinary mission?
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Michael Collins - How did the Apollo astronauts feel?

Moon landing conspiracy theorists like to point out the body language of Apollo astronauts during interviews and press conferences as a proof that they never went to the moon.

Here is Michael Collins' explanation as to why the Apollo astronauts seemed so distant and tight lipped in the public eye.

The clip is a bonus scene from the documentary In the Shadow of the Moon (2007). I'd highly recommend the movie to all space buffs.
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Trump meets with Apollo 11 astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins 50 years after moon landing

President Donald Trump met with astronauts Buzz Aldrin, Michael Collins and the family of Neil Armstrong in the oval office on Friday, July 19, to commemorate the 50 year anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. Aldrin and Armstrong walked on the moon on July 20, 1969, while Collins remained in orbit around the moon.

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Tribute to Apollo 11 Astronaut Michael Collins

Michael Collins was one of the third group of astronauts named by NASA in October 1963. He served as pilot on the 3-day Gemini 10 mission. His second flight was as command module pilot of the historic Apollo 11 mission in July 1969. He remained in lunar orbit while Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first men to walk on the Moon.

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Apollo 11's Mike Collins AeroAstro interview May 9, 2017

Apollo 11 command module pilot Michael Collins visits MIT AeroAstro for an interview and Q&A with students on May 9, 2017.

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins remembers historic mission

Former Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins, Charlie Duke of mission control, astronaut and engineer Rusty Schweickart and flight director Gerry Griffin are expected to speak about the historic mission in Florida.

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Apollo 11 Astronaut Michael Collins Talks Launch on 50th Anniversary

NASA's Apollo 11 command module pilot Michael Collins talks about the Saturn V rocket launching him towards the moon on July 16, 2019. -- Follow the Apollo Mission in Realtime, with mission audio and video:

Credit: NASA

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins reflects on the mission | USA TODAY

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins reflects on the mission that began 50 years ago with Kennedy Center Director Bob Cabana.

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Why the Apollo 11 Crew Was Quarantined Upon Return

The crew of Apollo 11 had made history by landing on the moon and coming back to Earth in one piece. But before the celebrations could begin, they would have to spend some time in quarantine.

From the Series: Apollo's Moon Shot: One Giant Leap

Hear Buzz Aldrin tell the story of the first moon landing

Buzz Aldrin was the second man to set foot on the moon. In February 2016 Aldrin came to the Science Museum in London to tell the story of the historic mission in his own words.

On 16 July 1969, Apollo 11 launched from Cape Kennedy on its way to becoming the first manned spacecraft to land on the moon. Aboard were Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin - the three brave men who made the historic journey. On 20 July, Armstrong became the first man to set foot on the moon and Aldrin joined him on the lunar surface soon after. The moon walk lasted nearly two-and-a-half hours while the pair collected lunar samples and conducted experiments.

The Kalb Report - A Conversation with Astronaut Michael Collins

In 1865, Jules Verne wrote the science fiction novel “From the Earth to the Moon and a Trip Around it.” Nearly 105 years later, Michael Collins “lived” what Jules Verne could only imagine.

In July of 1969, against the backdrop of the raging war in Vietnam and the social upheaval in American society, the eyes of the world turned skyward as three American astronauts roared their way toward history. In what has been described as the greatest technological achievement of the 20th century, Commander Neil Armstrong, Command Module Pilot Michael Collins and Lunar Module Pilot Edwin Buzz Aldrin fulfilled President John F. Kennedy’s commitment to “achieving the goal, before the end of the decade, of landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth.”

On April 15, 2019, Apollo 11 Astronaut Michael Collins will join moderator Marvin Kalb to discuss the impact of his historic mission on the nation, the world and humankind.

The Kalb Report series is underwritten by a grant from Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation. Maryland Public Television serves as presenting station.

Michael Collins: The fear and joy of the Apollo 11 mission

Inside the National Air and Space Museum, Michael Collins sits in front of a replica of a Lunar Landing Module. Just like the one he watched descend to the Moon surface 50 years ago.

“I wasn’t so worried about (Buzz and Neil’s) descent and landing nearly as I was about their return. If that engine didn’t ignite there were two dead men on the moon,” Collins said.

Apollo 11: former astronaut Michael Collins returns to launch site 50 years on

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Fifty years to the day since mankind launched the first mission to set foot on the moon, NASA is celebrating the occasion with a week full of events.

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Astronaut Michael Collins Recalls Landing on the Moon, 50 Years Later

Astronaut Michael Collins speaks on the significance of NASA's first moon landing 50 years to-the-day.

Michael Collins flew the Apollo 11 command module Columbia around the Moon while his crew mates, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, made the first crewed landing on the surface. Along with his Apollo 11 crew mates, Collins was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1969 and the Congressional Gold Medal in 2011.

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Apollo 11: A 50th Anniversary
One Small Step, One Giant Leap
July 20th, 2019

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Apollo 11 Astronaut Michael Collins Speaks With Expedition 60 Crew July 24, 2019

APOLLO 11 COMMAND MODULE PILOT TALKS TO THE SPACE STATION CREW

On the 50th anniversary of the return to Earth by the Apollo 11 astronauts from humanity’s first landing on the Moon, the pilot of the Apollo 11 command module Columbia spent a few minutes July 24 discussing spaceflight with the Expedition 60 crew aboard the International Space Station. Michael Collins conducted the call from the ISS Flight Control Room at the Johnson Space Center, Houston, one floor below the Mission Operations Control Room from which NASA engineers controlled the Apollo 11 mission.

The other Apollo Astronaut: Michael Collins #Apollo50

Michael Collins is a former astronaut who was part of the Apollo 11 moon mission. He was born in Rome on October 31, 1930, where his father, Major General James Collins, was stationed. After the United States entered World War II, the family moved to Washington, D.C., where Collins attended St. Albans School. During this time, he entered West Point Military Academy, and decided to follow his father into the armed services.
In 1952, Collins graduated from West Point with a Bachelor of Science degree. He joined the Air Force that same year. His excellent performance earned him a position on the advanced day fighter training team at Nellis Air Force Base, where he flew the advanced F-86 Sabres. He also served as an experimental flight test officer at Edwards Air Force Base in California, testing jet fighters.
Collins made the decision to become an astronaut after watching John Glenn's Mercury Atlas 6 flight. After his initial application was rejected, Collins entered the USAF Aerospace Research Pilot School as the Air Force began to research space more intensively. In 1963, NASA once again called for astronaut applications, and Collins was chosen to be part of the third group of astronauts.
Collins made two spaceflights as an astronaut. The first, on July 18, 1966, was the Gemini 10 mission, where Collins performed a spacewalk. The second was the famous Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969—the first lunar landing in history. Collins remained in the Command Module while his partners Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon's surface. After their safe return, Collins, Armstrong and Aldrin were all awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Richard Nixon.
Collins left NASA in January 1970 and joined the administrative staff of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. A decade later, in 1980, he entered the private sector, to work as an aerospace consultant. He remains active to this day, the least well known but no less important member of the Apollo 11 crew.

Secrets Of Astronaut Michael Collins

Michael Collins was born in Rome, Italy on October 31, 1930. Inspired by John Glenn, he was chosen by NASA to be part of the third group of astronauts. His first spaceflight was the Gemini 10 mission, where he performed a spacewalk. His second was Apollo 11—the first lunar landing in history. Collins received the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He currently works as an aerospace consultant.

WATCH: Astronaut Michael Collins discusses the Apollo 11 launch 50 years later

At the Kennedy Space Center, astronaut Michael Collins discusses the Apollo 11 launch 50 years later.

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