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What If You Jumped Into Lake Natron?

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What If You Jumped Into Lake Natron?

Have you ever heard of Medusa? The snake-haired greek monster who turns people to stone with a single glance? Well, she might just be a myth, but there is an area so deadly that it could actually turn you to stone. The infamous Lake Natron. What makes Lake Natron's water so dangerous? What kind of creatures live there? Could you survive if you fell in?

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What If You Fell in the Deadliest Lake - Lake Natron? (Animation)

Lake Natron is a natural lake in east Africa that is known for its beautiful colors, serenity, and for being one of the most inhospitable places for life on the whole planet! What would happen if you jumped into this deadly lake? Could you survive a swim in the dangerous waters of Lake Natron? Find out what happens to your body when you do in this all new episode of the funny animated show Fuzzy and Nutz!

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What Happens If You Jumped Into a Pool Full of Stomach Acid?

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It’s as strong as battery acid and can melt steel. But it lives inside of us and helps digest our food. This is stomach acid. Is stomach acid dangerous? If it’s this powerful, why doesn’t it hurt us? And what would happen if we jumped into a pool full of the stuff? That’s right. Stomach acid is compared to battery acid in terms of the damage it can do. It can range from a 1 to 3 on the pH scale, meaning it’s extremely acidic. That’s because stomach acid’s main component is hydrochloric acid, which is a highly corrosive substance. The reason it can live inside us is due to a special mucous membrane that lines our stomachs. But what would happen if we covered all our skin with it?

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Discover Lake Natron, The Lake that Turns Animals to Stones

Discover Lake Natron, a lake that Turns Animals to Stones

DISCLAIMER : For Copyright Matters please Contact us directly.... Email Address emmastopten@gmail.com. Thanks

Hello Displorers, welcome to another informative video presented to you by Displore and thanks for watching. In this video, we shall take a picnic to lake Natron, but make sure you take a body suit along, because we shall need protection as this lake is noted to turns animals to stones. In 2011, when he was traveling to shoot photos for a new book on the disappearing wildlife of East Africa, Across the Ravaged Land, photographer Nick Brandt came across a truly astounding place: A natural lake that seemingly turns all sorts of animals into stone. “When I saw those creatures for the first time alongside the lake, I was completely blown away,” says Brandt. “The idea for me, instantly, was to take portraits of them as if they were alive.”This pink body of water is a huge attraction both to humans as well as births especially pink flamingos who flock to the lake area but most of these birds meet their death as soon as they touch the lake water. They are turned to stones which can be kept for long and the reason for this peculiar lake’s characteristic lies in its water. In this video, we shall look into this spectacular beauty full of danger in eastern Africa and why it is acts the way it does.

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The Basics of Lake Natron
Lake Natron is a salt or soda lake in Arusha Region in Tanzaniain the Gregory Rift, which is the eastern branch of the East African Rift. The lake is within the Lake Natron Basin, a Ramsar Site wetland of international significance. At the southern half of Lake Natron,fault scarps and the Gelai Volcano can also be seen as well asnumerous near-white salt-crust rafts pepper the shallowest parts of the lake.The lake is fed principally by the Southern Ewaso Ng'iro River, which rises in central Kenya, and by mineral-rich hot springs. It is quite shallow, less than three metres deep, and varies in width depending on its water level. The lake is a maximum of 57 kilometres long and 22 kilometres wide.

Why Lake Natron is so Ghastly
The surrounding area receives irregular seasonal rainfall, mainly between December and May totalling 800 millimetres per year with temperatures at the lake frequently above 40°C.With such high temperature, it has led to high evaporation rates in the lake. High levels of evaporation have left behind natron or sodium carbonate decahydrate and trona or sodium sesquicarbonate dihydrate. These deposits of sodium carbonate was once used in Egyptian mummification. The alkalinity of the lake can reach a pH of greater than 12. The surrounding bedrock is composed of alkaline, sodium-dominated trachyte lavas that were laid down during the Pleistocene period. The lavas have significant amounts of carbonate but very low calcium and magnesium levels. This has allowed the lake to concentrate into a caustic alkaline brine.
The ghastly Lake Natron, is a Salt Lake meaning that water flows in, but doesn’t flow out, so it can only escape by evaporation. Over time, as water evaporates, it leaves behind high concentrations of salt and other minerals, like at the Dead Sea and Utah’s Great Salt Lake.
Unlike those other lakes, though, Lake Natron is extremely alkaline, due to high amounts of the chemical natron in the water which gives the water its very high pH of about 12 that is nearly as high as ammonia. And as you might expect, few creatures live in the harsh waters as it is home to just a single fish species, the Alcolapia latilabris, some algae and a colony of flamingos that feeds on the algae and breeds on the shore.
The surface of the lake can also be very deceitful from above as it looks like empty space. This causes migrating birds to frequently crash into the lake’s surface. Brandt theorizes that the highly-reflective, chemical dense waters act like a glass door, fooling birds into thinking they’re flying through empty space and not long ago, a helicopter pilot tragically fell victim to the same illusion, and his crashed aircraft was rapidly corroded by the lake’s waters. During dry season, when the water recedes, the birds’ desiccated as chemically-preserved carcasses wash up along the coastline.These chemically preserved bird and animal carcasses can be collected as finely-preserved specimens which are extraordinarily beautiful to see. Even human contact is also dangerously painful which is why nobody dares to swim in the lake ever.
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8 Places You Should Never Swim In (Even If You Want To)

There are lots of amazing outdoor swimming areas in the world. Some of them are safe and protected with lifeguards watching over you while you swim, bathe, dive off rocks, and play in the water. But some beaches are not just unsafe — they’re outright dangerous! Here are 8 places where you should never attempt a swim if you treasure your health and life.

TIMESTAMPS:
Blue Holes 1:03
Colorful Pools 2:15
Laguna Caliente 4:18
Nyiragongo Crater's Lava Lake 5:16
Pink Lake 6:19
New Smyrna Beach 8:12
Frying Pan Lake 9:22
Eagle's Nest Sinkhole 10:22

Music:

SUMMARY:
- Most blue holes are open to the public. However, some of the biggest ones have acquired a really bad reputation among divers.
- It's hard to believe that nature created something as colorful as the thermal pools located in Yellowstone National Park. They look like something from another world: bright, beautiful...and deadly.
- Laguna Caliente is located in Costa Rica and differs dramatically from its sibling, Botos Lake. These 2 bodies of water are crater lakes of the Poas Volcano.
- Mount Nyiragongo, which is situated in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, is an active volcano. Its last eruption took place in 2002. In its crater, there's a lake. But it’s not your typical lake.
- Lake Hillier in Western Australia is indeed as pink as it looks. This is a shallow salt lake that’s beautifully edged with white salt formations and surrounded by eucalyptus forests.
- New Smyrna Beach has been called the “Shark Capital of the World” by the International Shark Attack File. In 2008, almost 40% of all shark attacks on the planet happened in this region.
- If you look at the photo of Frying Pan Lake in New Zealand, you might think that there's fog hanging low over the water. Similar fog (or, more precisely, steam) forms over warm water on a cold morning.
- Eagle's Nest Sinkhole is a body of water in Florida that looks like an ordinary pond. It’s only when you get into the water that it gets dangerous. Beneath the lake, there's a huge system of underwater caves with rooms and passages that spread for miles.

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What If You Could Swim in Titan’s Lakes?

What if…. you could swim in Titan’s lakes? Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, is unique. It has its own atmosphere.

Not only that, it’s the only planet or moon other than Earth to have bodies of liquid on its surface. What would happen if you decided to swim here?

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Imagination will often carry us to worlds that never were. But without it, we go nowhere. — Carl Sagan
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【Manga】What If You Enter Lake Natron

A bright red lake where animals become fossilized. When Carlo went to explore and touched the water…

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What If You Fell Into the Deepest Hole on Earth?

This is the deepest hole mankind has ever dug. It's a straight drop into the bowels of the Earth. For 20 years, Russian scientists and engineers drilled deeper and deeper, hoping to uncover whatever mysteries the hole may hold, earning it the ominous nickname of The Well to Hell. What would happen if, for whatever reason, you fell into this hole? What would happen to your body? How deep would you fall?

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What If is a mini-documentary web series that takes you on an epic journey through hypothetical worlds and possibilities. Join us on an imaginary adventure — grounded in scientific theory — through time, space and chance, as we ask what if some of the most fundamental aspects of our existence were different.

What If You Jumped Into a Pool Full of Honey?

Is your speed in water unmatched? Does your breaststroke leave your opponents in the last place? Maybe you're ready for a different challenge. So, what if you jumped into a pool full of honey? Would you sink to the bottom? Could you eat during your swim? And is honey just bee spit?

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What If is a mini-documentary web series that takes you on an epic journey through hypothetical worlds and possibilities. Join us on an imaginary adventure through time, space and chance while we (hopefully) boil down complex subjects in a fun and entertaining way.

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What If You Jumped Into a Geyser?

Deep beneath the Earth, something is gearing up to explode! It shoots boiling hot liquid up into the air as high as 160 m (525 ft) feet. No, these aren't volcanoes. They're geysers. Usually, people stay hundreds of meters away from geysers, but what if we got a bit closer and jumped right into one?
What makes these geysers so hot? What's inside of them? And how would your body react if you fell into one?

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Thumbnail: artist impression, not an actual photograph. Source image credit: NPS/Neal Hebert

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What If is a mini-documentary web series that takes you on an epic journey through hypothetical worlds and possibilities. Join us on an imaginary adventure through time, space and chance while we (hopefully) boil down complex subjects in a fun and entertaining way.

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What if you jumped into lake natron (what if parody)

What If You Fell Into a Mercury Pool?

#eldddir #eldddir_homo

Would You Survive If You Fell into a Volcano

Volcanos are essentially hollow mountains filled with toxic gas and hot molten rock. They’re just as rocky and shelfy on the inside as they are on the outside. Temperatures inside a volcano can top 2,000°F. That means pretty much anything but titanium or platinum, which won’t melt until they hit a toasty 3,000°F, will drip-drip-drip into nothing.

But humans can survive falling into a volcano! A Maasai porter fell into a Tanzania volcano back in 2007 and lived to tell the tale. Of course, he didn’t come out untouched by the hot molten rock, but he survived! It seemed like a miracle, but – with a little help from our old friend Adrenaline – the man managed to climb out!

Other videos you might like:
A Helicopter Fell Into a Volcano But It Was a Lucky Day
All 4 Engines Failed Over a Volcano, See What Happened Next
8 Places You Should Never Swim In (Even If You Want To)

TIMESTAMPS:
What adrenaline does to your body 0:37
A volcano's temperature 1:37
Why we flail our arms when we fall 2:45
What magma actually is 4:44
Is it possible to survive there? 5:48

#survivaltips #volcanoes #brightside

SUMMARY:
- Adrenal glands release when your brain’s alarm system senses danger. It triggers your body’s “fight or flight response.”
- You’ll immediately feel your heart speed up, making you quicker. Sugars in your blood break down, and your breathing gets faster.
- We instantly flail our arms when we fall because it helped our primate ancestors. At least, according to Charles Darwin’s Theory of Evolution.
- Generations later, the instinct to flail your arms persists, and good news! It just might save you when you fall into that volcano! The more you move your arms, the more likely you are to grasp hold of a ledge.
- Magma is simply a fancy word for liquid rock. But don’t let the word “liquid” fool you – this stuff is thick! No, you won’t bounce off it like a trampoline, but you won’t sink into it either.
- In May of 2019, a 32-year-old soldier hopped over the guardrail of Kilauea, an active shield volcano in Hawaii.
- Lucky, too, that the man was physically fit. He was a soldier, after all! Not necessarily a smart one. The man managed to land on a narrow ledge.
- It took more than 2 hours, but a daring crew rappelled into the crater and rescued the rail-hopper. They hauled him out safely, and a helicopter flew him to the hospital.
- All this should give you hope, but it should also teach you one valuable lesson: when it comes to guardrails, they put those there for a reason, so stay on the right side!

Music by Epidemic Sound

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What If You Jumped Into Lake Natron?

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What If You Fell Into a Pool of Hagfish?

They're sneaky. They're slimy. And they're hungry for meat. The hagfish, or slime eel, has earned its name due to its unique defense mechanism. When they are agitated, hagfish can secrete slime to choke unsuspecting predators. Even sharks fall prey to their gunky wrath. This makes us wonder, what would happen if you fell into a pool full of them? What makes the hagfish so unique? How does hagfish slime expand so rapidly? And why is the hagfish useful to us?

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Lake Natron, Tanzania

What If You Fell Into a Pool of Aerogel?

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This is aerogel, the world's lightest solid. This incredibly rare substance has been used in space crafts as an insulator. But instead of using aerogel for something useful, why don't we fill up an entire pool with the stuff? And then have you jump into it. What is aerogel made out of? What would it do to your skin? And how much would this cost?

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what of you jumping into lake natron

Lake Natron is a salt or soda lake in Arusha Region in Tanzania. It is in the Gregory Rift, which is the eastern branch of the East African Rift.[1] The lake is within the Lake Natron Basin, a Ramsar Site wetland of international significance.[2]

Lake Natron


The lake on 6 March 2017 (satellite image)







Lake Natron

LocationNorthern TanzaniaCoordinates02°25′S 36°00′ELake typesalineBasin countriesTanzaniaSurface elevation600 metres (2,000 ft)[1]

Ramsar Wetland

Official nameLake Natron BasinDesignated4 July 2001Reference no.1080[2]




The southern half of Lake Natron (top). Fault scarps and the Gelai Volcano can also be seen. Numerous near-white salt-crust rafts pepper the shallowest parts of the lake (inset).

The lake is fed principally by the Southern Ewaso Ng'iro River, which rises in central Kenya, and by mineral-rich hot springs.[1] It is quite shallow, less than three metres (9.8 ft) deep, and varies in width depending on its water level. The lake is a maximum of 57 kilometres (35 mi) long and 22 kilometres (14 mi) wide.[1] The surrounding area receives irregular seasonal rainfall, mainly between December and May totalling 800 millimetres (31 in) per year.[1] Temperatures at the lake are frequently above 40 °C (104 °F).[1]

High levels of evaporation have left behind natron (sodium carbonate decahydrate) and trona (sodium sesquicarbonate dihydrate). The alkalinity of the lake can reach a pH of greater than 12. The surrounding bedrock is composed of alkaline, sodium-dominated trachyte lavas that were laid down during the Pleistocene period. The lavas have significant amounts of carbonate but very low calcium and magnesium levels. This has allowed the lake to concentrate into a caustic alkaline brine.[3]
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What If You Fell Into a Piranha Pool?

Its teeth are supposedly so sharp that if it were to bite you, you would only realize it after you saw the blood. But what if you were attacked by a school of these colorful, fast-moving carnivores? How much would you feel? How long would you last?

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What’s Hidden Under The Deadliest Lake On Earth?

#eldddir #eldddir_earth

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