This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

Who were the Neanderthals? | DW Documentary

x

Who were the Neanderthals? | DW Documentary

Long before Homo sapiens populated the earth, the Neanderthals lived in Eurasia.
Now, paleoanthropologists in England and France are using new archeological methods to shed light on some previously unexplained Neanderthal mysteries.

In an age clouded by the mists of time, the first early humans colonized the Eurasian continent. They settled on land that had only recently been covered by glaciers. This species, called Neanderthals, died out about 30,000 years ago -- but at one time, they formed the largest group in an area that stretched from northern France to the Belgian coast and from the Channel Islands to southern England.

During the last Ice Age, the North Sea was frozen over -- and the English Channel was a small river that could easily be crossed on foot. The Neanderthals lived in close harmony with their perpetually changing environment. They had everything they needed to survive: the meat of prey animals, edible wild plants, water and wood for cooking and heating. How did these early humans develop over almost 300,000 years? What were their lives like before they became extinct?

Our documentary is based on the latest research. We investigate various populations of Neanderthals, and visit archaeological sites in northern France, southern England, and on the island of Jersey.

Renowned researchers such as the British paleoanthropologist Chris Stringer and his French colleague Ludovic Slimak describe how the Neanderthals lived, and discuss their cognitive abilities. Was this species capable of structured thinking? Did they have cultures, languages, and societies? How intelligent were they, and what sort of adaptive strategies kept them alive for 300,000 years? How similar were they to modern-day humans?

-------------------------------------------------------------------

DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

Subscribe to:
DW Documentary:
DW Documental (Spanish):
DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

For more visit:

Instagram:

Facebook:


We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:
x

Are we ready for the next crisis? | DW Documentary

Why is the world constantly on the brink of a new financial crisis? This film explores the reasons for our risky financial system, and looks at how the financial world could be reshaped to be better prepared for the future.

Since 2008, trust between citizens and financial systems has been deeply shaken. Many were left wondering how things could go so badly wrong. And there’s no sign that the world has broken out of its spiral of crisis after crisis. The billions thrown around on financial markets have no positive effect on ordinary people. There’s now growing anger, and a determination that the current economic system, in which money means power, must finally be cleaned up. Politically, things haven’t improved since the last crisis - if anything the opposite has happened. This documentary gives voice to economists, historians, journalists, artists and activists. Given the current pandemic, it’s more clear than ever that the system needs to be challenged. Only then can we overcome the economic, political and climatic problems of the future.

ـــــ
DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

Subscribe to:
DW Documentary:
DW Documental (Spanish):
DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

For more visit:

Instagram:

Facebook:


We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:
x

How does North Korea finance a nuclear weapons program? | DW Documentary

How is it possible that North Korea can finance a nuclear weapons program? One of the poorest countries in the world is even able to worry the United States with its nuclear arsenal. The answer lies in the criminal activities of Office 39.

The organization Office 39 is a secret division of the government. Its goal is to obtain foreign currency by any means possible, providing Kim Jong Un’s totalitarian regime with financial resources. Drugs, counterfeit money, human trafficking, insurance fraud: nothing is off-limits for these North Korean gangsters. This documentary reveals their most spectacular schemes, and lays bare the sensational methods that have allowed the isolated country to circumvent UN sanctions and build up its nuclear program over a period of decades.

#documentary #NorthKorea #NorthKoreadocumentary #Office39

ـــــ
DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

Subscribe to:
DW Documentary:
DW Documental (Spanish):
DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

For more visit:

Instagram:

Facebook:


We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:
x

Do whales and humans speak the same language? | DW Documentary

Are the sounds and acoustic signals whales make similar to human language? Biologists agree the animals communicate with one another. This film takes a journey into the depths of the oceans to decipher the language of the orcas using AI.

Killer whales live in small pods. Within these family groups they communicate with one another using their own sound dialects. With the help of artificial intelligence, scientists are now looking for repeated patterns which would indicate that orcas have a language model.

A team of researchers headed by Professor Elmar Noeth and Rachael Cheng from the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg spent three years collecting data on the movements and vocalization of various orca pods in the Pacific. Their aim was to investigate a possible connection between the patterns of the killer whales‘ calls and their behavior. Using special microphones, they captured the underwater sounds and behaviors of these marine mammals. Then they tried to determine the whales‘ position and classify their calls. It’s a first step towards solving the mysteries of whale song.

Using artificial intelligence to decipher unfamiliar communications systems is not without its difficulties. However, it’s already clear that AI will transform our ideas about highly communicative species in the coming years.

#documentary #whales #naturedocumentary

ـــــ
DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

Subscribe to:
DW Documentary:
DW Documental (Spanish):
DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

For more visit:

Instagram:

Facebook:


We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:
x

Spain: Pilgrims back on the way of St. James | DW Documentary

Manolo is a 65-year-old lawyer - and atheist - walking the road to Santiago de Compostela for the 99th time. For him, the pilgrimage is about contemplation and self-discovery. This time he also wants to test his strength after recovering from COVID.

Manolo is still feeling the effects of COVID-19. He has trouble breathing and tires easily. But he won't let that stop him from making the journey and pursuing his goal of doing the pilgrimage 100 times. The route has only recently reopened. For months Spain's regional borders were closed due to the pandemic, and the Camino de Santiago was more or less deserted. That was a problem for the many hostels along the way, and indeed for the entire region, for which the pilgrims are an important source of revenue. The travelers range from devout Catholics to freethinkers like Manolo. But one thing unites them: they all agree that walking the Way of St. James is a life-changing experience. A report by Norman Striegel.

ـــــ
DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

Subscribe to:
DW Documentary:
DW Documental (Spanish):
DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

For more visit:

Instagram:

Facebook:


We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

Volcanoes, war zones, disasters – extreme tourism | DW Documentary

Thrill-seeking tourists are being drawn to extreme, life-threatening destinations. Travel agencies specializing in perilous holidays offer organized trips to areas struck by natural or nuclear disasters, and even war zones.

We follow one group of tourists as they scale the mountains of Hindu-Kush in Afghanistan, climbing 4000 meters above sea level to ski down this one-of-a-kind slope. In Indonesia we meet another group climbing the active volcano Anak Krakatoa. In Ukraine, adventurous tourists come from all over the globe to visit the ghost city of Chernobyl, the site of the worst nuclear disaster in human history.

#documentary #volcano #vacation

ـــــ
DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

Subscribe to:
DW Documentary:
DW Documental (Spanish):
DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

For more visit:

Instagram:

Facebook:


We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

Transylvania's Gábor – between tradition and modernity | DW Documentary

For 500 years, Transylvania’s Gábor people have held onto their values and rituals. This film explores the insular world of the Gábor Roma, and asks whether they can maintain their traditional lives in a globalized world.

The Romanian village of Karácsonyfalva is the center of the Gábor Roma community. More than 1,000 Gábor live there. The men wear large black hats, the women long skirts. The men travel all over Europe as traders, while the women raise the children. Most Gábor belong to the Adventist denomination. Many only learned to read in order to study the Bible. Abstaining from pork and above all from alcohol and tobacco makes them targets of curiosity. Considered aristocratic among the Roma people, the Gábor have their own laws in all areas of life. Problems are solved within the community; in cases of conflict, even the police turn to the community leaders. Their biggest and most important celebration is the wedding, the foundation of their society. Gábor marry exclusively among themselves. For this reason, girls are removed from school at age 11 and married at 14. Boys move from organized education to the school of life at 14. This documentary follows the marriage of 14-year-old Mundra to 16-year-old Bobbi, while giving a portrait of their families and the wider community. For the first time, they share an insight into their exciting, colorful, contradictory and insular world, in which wealth and poverty collide. This is a tight-knit community, one caught between tradition and the pressures of modernity.

ـــــ
DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

Subscribe to:
DW Documentary:
DW Documental (Spanish):
DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

For more visit:

Instagram:

Facebook:


We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

Secrets of the Stone Age (1/2) | DW Documentary

During the Stone Age, humans shifted from the nomadic lifestyle to the more settled life of farmers. A documentary on an important period of human history. Watch Part 2 here:

Around 12,000 years ago, humans underwent a transition from nomads to settlers. That epoch, the Stone Age, produced monumental building works. Part 1 of this two-part documentary illuminates the cultural background of these structures and shows the difficulties Stone Age humans had to contend with. Until around 10,000 BC, humans lived as hunters and gatherers. Then an irreversible change began. Settlements formed. For millions of years humans lived as foragers and suddenly their lives changed radically. This was far more radical than the start of the digital age or industrialization, says prehistorian Hermann Parzinger, president of the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation. For a long time, scholars believed that a sedentary lifestyle was a prerequisite for constructing large buildings. Then archaeologist Klaus Schmidt discovered Göbekli Tepe in southern Turkey, a 12,000-year-old complex of stone blocks weighing up to 20 tons. Its builders were still hunter- gatherers. They decorated the stone columns with ornate animal reliefs. How these structures were used and who was allowed access to them remains a mystery. But we now know that the site was abandoned and covered over once settlements took root. Human development continued its course. The discovery of agriculture and animal husbandry led to larger settlements, a changed diet and ultimately to dependence on material goods. This social upheaval in the late Neolithic period has influenced our lives up to the present day. But experts agree that the monuments of the Stone Age prove that humans have gigantomanic tendencies and a need to immortalize themselves.
_______

DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

Subscribe to DW Documentary:

For more documentaries visit:

Instagram

Facebook:


DW netiquette policy:

Asteroids – a new El Dorado in space? | DW Documentary

Mining on asteroids sounds like the stuff of science fiction, but it could soon become a reality. Nations and powerful corporations already have plans for such ventures and are hard at work staking their claim to resources from space.

How can economic growth continue unfettered once all the earth's resources have been consumed? Major companies and governments have long been working on plans to exploit the resources to be found in the vastness of space. How far are humans from achieving this? This documentary examines the technological requirements of space mining. It also assesses how great the desire is to find new sources of raw materials. The film touches on scientific and fundamental societal issues - including humanity’s craving for new territories and our degradation of the Earth as we attempt to exploit all our planet has to offer.

ـــــ
DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

Subscribe to:
DW Documentary:
DW Documental (Spanish):
DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

For more visit:

Instagram:

Facebook:


We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

Who is Mona Lisa? | DW Documentary

Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa is probably the world’s most famous painting. But whose portrait actually is it? There are two clues to the identity of the mysterious young woman, but they are mutually exclusive. Can the riddle ever be solved?

Every year, millions of visitors view the portrait exhibited in the legendary Louvre in Paris. But what makes the Mona Lisa so special? Who is hidden behind this smiling and yet sad face? Who was Leonardo's model? Or is she even the imaginary image of an ideal beauty? Experts have been wrestling with this question for centuries. There seems to be evidence for two explanations. Both variants have been handed down in writing, but they are not compatible.

The most recognized theory goes back to the biographer Giorgio Vasari. According to him, the portrait is of Lisa del Giocondo, the wife of a Florentine silk merchant who had commissioned the work from Leonardo in 1503. But this is contradicted by a note of the chronicler Antonio de Beatis dating back to 1517, in which da Vinci states that he produced the painting at the request of Giuliano de' Medici. The artist said it was an imaginary representation de' Medici's mistress Pacifica Brandani, with whom de’Medici had an illegitimate son. Within the community researching Leonardo today, both theories have their supporters. Using elaborate reconstructions, original locations and scientific methodology, this documentary delves deep into the time of Leonardo da Vinci.


------------------------------------------------------------------

DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

Also subscribe to:
DW Documental (Spanish):
DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

For more visit:

Instagram:

Facebook:


DW netiquette policy:
x

وثائقي | إسبانيا: عودة الحج عبر طريق سانتياغو دي كومبوستيلا | وثائقية دي دبليو

يقوم المحامي مانولو البالغ 65 عامًا، برحلة حج عبر كامينو دي سانتياغو للمرة التاسعة والتسعين. بالنسبة له، يتعلق الأمر بالتأمل الداخلي، وفي هذه المرة يريد أيضًا إثبات أمر مهم لنفسه، وهو أنه عاد أخيرًا إلى لياقته البدنية المعتادة بعد إصابته بكوفيد.
إنه لا يزال يعاني من عواقب إصابته بكوفيد حتى اليوم، حيث أنه يشعر بصعوبة في التنفس ويشعر بالإرهاق بسرعة أكبر. لكن ذلك لا يردعه: فأحد أهدافه في الحياة هو القيام بالحج على طريق كامينو دي سانتياغو مائة مرة. ولكن حتى وقت قريب، لم يكن ذلك ممكنًا على الإطلاق: فأثناء جائحة كورونا، تم إغلاق الحدود الإقليمية الإسبانية لفترة طويلة، وكان الطريق مغلقاً. شكل ذلك مشكلة للعديد من النزل على طول الطريق، بل وللمنطقة المعتمدة على الحجاج كمصدر رزق. وهناك العديد من الكاثوليك المتدينين بين الحجاج، ولكن هناك أيضًا أشخاص كمانولو. جميعهم لديهم شيء واحد مشترك: يقولون إن القيام بالحج في كامينو دي سانتياغو يعد تجربة ستغير الحياة. ريبورتاج: نورمان شتريغل.
ـــــ
دعوة للحوار لدى دي دبليو:

المزيد من الأفلام الوثائقية تجدونها على مواقعنا باللغة الانجليزية:

Traveling Iran by train | DW Documentary

Iran is opening its doors to foreigners and a train ride from the Persian Gulf to the Caspian Sea is a great way to get to know the country and its people.

The travel restrictions that are now being lifted were in place for decades. Many Iranians are hoping they will now be able to lead a freer life – and we meet many of these hospitable and welcoming people on our journey through the Middle Eastern nation.

The country’s most important rail link, the Trans-Iranian Railway, runs for approximately 1400 kilometers from the Persian Gulf via Teheran to the Caspian Sea. The journey starts in Khorramshahr on the Shatt al-Arab, the river border between Iraq and Iran.

Traveling past oil fields, the train reaches Shushtar. One of the top sights here is the historic hydraulic system, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. After that, the train heads up into the Zagros Mountains. The journey is interrupted by a break for prayer. Breath-taking landscapes move past the train window until we reach the highest point not only of our journey but of the entire rail network: 2,200 meters above sea level between Dorud and Arak.

During a brief stop in Qom, travelers can refuel with sohan, a pastry made of wheat germ, flour and sugar. The next section of the track is high-speed and we continue on to Teheran at 160 km/h. The metropolitan area is home to more than 15 million people. The last leg takes us to the north of the country.

In the Alborz Mountains, we find out what role the Trans-Iranian Railway played during Stalin’s major offensive against the German army in World War II. Our oriental rail adventure ends in Bandar-e Torkaman on the Caspian Sea.
_______

Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time.

Subscribe to DW Documentary:

For more information visit:

Instagram:

Facebook:

Moon mission | DW Documentary

Fifty years after the first Moon landing, researchers are working at full speed on the next lunar mission. Their aim is to build a habitable research station on the Moon. What is the current state of play in international lunar research?

For four and a half billion years, the Moon has been the Earth’s constant companion. Fifty years after man first set foot on its surface, researchers around the world are again working flat out on a new lunar mission to the Moon with the aim of setting up a habitable research station there. In 1969, the American astronaut Neil Armstrong spent less than a day on the Moon. Now the aim is to actually be able to live there. However, there are still some significant obstacles to overcome. Unprotected by any atmosphere, the Moon’s surface is exposed to a hundred times more radiation than the Earth, and any habitable Moon base will have to solve this problem. But how will they be able to build a module where researchers can live and work for months at all? Engineers and scientists are working on ways to use Moon dust, which is similar to basalt, as a building material. Another problem is that space suits have mainly been designed for space travel and they are unsuitable for use in low gravity conditions - the Moon’s gravity is just a sixth of the Earth’s. The German Aerospace Center’s EDEN ISS project is testing ways to cultivate food in a hostile environment in Antarctica, growing tomatoes and cucumbers are grown in a closed-circuit container. The filmmakers visit research institutes all over the world to get up-to-date answers to the most crucial questions about lunar research.

--------------------------------------------------------------------
DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

Subscribe to:
DW Documentary:
DW Documental (Spanish):
DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

For more visit:

Instagram:

Facebook:


DW netiquette policy:

How Did Neanderthals Dispose Of The Dead? Prehistory / Human Evolution Documentary

Neanderthals, like us, deliberately disposed of the dead. Check out the different ways they did that.

This video was selected by my patreons. Thanks everyone for your support!



Artwork by Ettore Mazza:

Disclaimer: Use my videos as a rough guide to a topic. I am not an expert, I may get things wrong. This is why I always post my sources so you can critique my work and verify things for yourselves. Of course I aim to be as accurate as possible which is why you will only find reputable sources in my videos. Secondly, information is always subject to changes as new information is uncovered by archaeologists.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -






--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sources:
1) Dibble, Harold L., et al. “A Critical Look at Evidence from La Chapelle-Aux-Saints Supporting an Intentional Neandertal Burial.” Journal of Archaeological Science, vol. 53, 2015, pp. 649–657., doi:10.1016/j.jas.2014.04.019.

2) Golovanova, L. V., et al. “Mezmaiskaya Cave: A Neanderthal Occupation in the Northern Caucasus.” Current Anthropology, vol. 40, no. 1, 1999, pp. 77–86., doi:10.1086/515805.


3) Pettitt, Paul. The Palaeolithic Origins of Human Burial. Routledge, 2011.

4) Rendu, W., et al. “Evidence Supporting an Intentional Neandertal Burial at La Chapelle-Aux-Saints.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 111, no. 1, 2013, pp. 81–86., doi:10.1073/pnas.1316780110.

5) Rougier, H., Crevecoeur, I., Beauval, C. et al. Neandertal cannibalism and Neandertal bones used as tools in Northern Europe. Sci Rep 6, 29005 (2016) doi:10.1038/srep29005

6) Rak, Y., et al. “A Neandertal Infant from Amud Cave, Israel.” Journal of Human Evolution, vol. 26, no. 4, 1994, pp. 313–324., doi:10.1006/jhev.1994.1019.


7) Pinhasi, R., et al. “Revised Age of Late Neanderthal Occupation and the End of the Middle Paleolithic in the Northern Caucasus.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 108, no. 21, 2011, pp. 8611–8616., doi:10.1073/pnas.1018938108.

8)

9) Sommer, Jeffrey D. “The Shanidar IV ‘Flower Burial’: a Re-Evaluation of Neanderthal Burial Ritual.” Cambridge Archaeological Journal, vol. 9, no. 1, 1999, pp. 127–129., doi:10.1017/s0959774300015249.

10) 2006f Krapina 3: Cut marks and ritual behavior? (with J. Orschiedt, J. Cook, M.D. Russell and J. Radovčić.) Periodicum biologorum 108: 519-524.

11) Majkić, Ana, et al. “A Decorated Raven Bone from the Zaskalnaya VI (Kolosovskaya) Neanderthal Site, Crimea.” Plos One, vol. 12, no. 3, 2017, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0173435.

Will the next pandemic start in Brazil? | DW Documentary

‘The next pandemic will come from the Amazon region’, says Dr. Alessandra Nava, a Manaus scientist conducting research on bats. She is hunting down viruses which lurk in the rain forest and may be dangerous to humans.

She makes her way through the heart of the Amazon rainforest. At night, Alessandra Nava catches different species of bats in nets or traps. In her laboratory she has already detected new viruses in the bats’ blood or urine. At some point, these could be transmitted to humans. So-called zoonotic diseases like this are increasingly common. The more that humans encroach on the wilderness, the more likely it is that viruses will spread between the species.

The destruction of the Amazon jungle therefore means a higher risk of pandemics. Wherever agricultural land borders on the rain forest, researchers are already registering increased cases of dengue fever, for example. It’s easy for the virus to spread there. Here on the bordering area there are only a few species left: cattle, pigs and cats - the virus soon adapts to its new host. Often, it’s only a matter of time until the virus adapts to the human organism and attacks it. ‘If we carry on this way, it’s only a question of time until we are confronted with the next pandemic’, Nava says. And it could spread from Brazil to the rest of the world.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

Subscribe to:
DW Documentary:
DW Documental (Spanish):
DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

For more visit:

Instagram:

Facebook:


We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:
x

Antarctica: A message from another planet | DW Documentary

The world's major powers agree: the resources of Antarctica should be exploited peacefully. They have promised to promote peace and scientific research in Antarctica, and to protect its environment. But is this spirit real, or just a lot of talk?

This documentary features interviews with researchers, activists, diplomats, and military personnel from Spain, Russia, Portugal, Chile, Argentina, and the United States. There's been much debate over how to share control of resources in Antarctica, which is the world's oldest ecosystem. Critics say that behind the scenes, a game of high-stakes poker is underway. Could this competition end in armed conflict? Or will Antarctica serve as a model for peaceful international cooperation? This film addresses these complicated issues with in-depth analysis, accompanied by magnificent images of the Antarctic landscape. The documentary's soundtrack was composed by Javier Weyler, former drummer of the Welsh rock band, the Stereophonics.


-------------------------------------------------------------------

DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

Subscribe to:
DW Documentary:

DW Documental (Spanish):
DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

For more visit:

Instagram:

Facebook:


We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

What happened to Otto Warmbier in North Korea? | DW Documentary

US student Otto Warmbier was sentenced to 15 years in a North Korean labor camp in 2016. Warmbier was released the following year, but he died of brain damage shortly after his return to the United States. Was he really the victim of torture?

Otto Warmbier was sentenced to 15 years hard labor in 2016 after being convicted of attempting to steal a propaganda poster during a trip to Pyongyang. Just over a year on he was dead, having been sent home to the US in a vegetative state. US President Donald Trump tweeted that he had been tortured beyond belief in North Korea. The US president blamed both the North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and the Obama administration for Warmbier’s death - and Trump appeared before the media with the student’s parents. This was at the peak of the North Korean missile crisis. Later, as relations between Trump and Kim Jong Un became warmer, the US president changed his tune. In 2019 Trump said that he believed that Kim did not know what happened to the US student much to the consternation of Warmbier’s parents.

What really happened to Otto Warmbier in North Korea? Veteran foreign correspondent Klaus Scherer sets out to try to find out. In the documentary, Scherer interviews a number of people with knowledge of the case who have been largely unheard up to now. He shows that a US court investigating a liability case against North Korea brought by Warmbier’s parents also ignored important witnesses, who continue to cast doubt on the torture allegations. These include the coroner in Cincinnati who examined Warmbier’s body. She believes that the account given by North Korean doctors is credible. They claim that Warmbier had inadvertently been given too high a dose of sedatives by prison staff. This, the medics say was the cause of his state of unresponsive wakefulness. Could Trump’s initial torture charges simply have been motivated by political opportunism?

-------------------------------------------------------------------

DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

Subscribe to:
DW Documentary:

DW Documental (Spanish):
DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

For more visit:

Instagram:

Facebook:


DW netiquette policy:

The dinosaur village | DW Documentary

More well-preserved dinosaur fossils have been found in Thuringia, Germany, than anywhere else in the world. Almost every skeleton find has become a global sensation. As the archaeologists keep digging, they may have discovered a new species.

Forty-five years ago, geologist Dr. Thomas Martens discovered the first dinosaur bones in an old quarry near Tambach-Dietharz. Since then, he has located 40 skeletons belonging to 12 different primordial dinosaur species, as well a number of insect and plant fossils. A 26cm-long lizard looks like a miniature of the famous dinosaur Tyrannosaurus Rex. Two amphibians of the Seymouria genus lying next to each other are also an important discovery. They all originate from the Lower Permian around 290 million years ago. Similar remains have been found in Texas, Utah and New Mexico in the USA and American colleagues have been coming to Thuringia every summer to excavate for the last two decades. Together, the palaeontologists have unearthed further proof that all of today’s continents were once connected and formed the primeval continent of Pangaea. The scientists are part of a great Thuringian research tradition. Both the first dinosaur skeleton and the first slabs of rock containing saurian fossil remains were found there.

--------------------------------------------------------------------
DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

Subscribe to:
DW Documentary:
DW Documental (Spanish):
DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

For more visit:

Instagram:

Facebook:


DW netiquette policy:

A train ride into Japan's past | DW Documentary

Kyushu is said to be the wellspring of Japanese civilization. Yet few tourists visit the southernmost of Japan's main islands. This documentary contrasts modern Japanese cities with traditional customs in the countryside.

The rail journey begins in Fukuoka - a city with a metro population of 2.5 million - and ends at the southern tip of the island, in the city of Ibusuki. As the train rolls along, it travels through time - and reveals the amazing diversity and contrasts of the most southerly of Japan's four main islands. The trip provides spectacular landscape views, as well as deep insight into a foreign culture, and its ancient traditions and modern lifestyles.

In the West, Kyushu is one of the lesser-known regions in the Land of the Rising Sun. Even for the Japanese, the green, mountainous island is seen mostly as a holiday spot. Europeans rarely visit this part of the country - but there are plenty of restaurants and cafes that have names like Wolfgang, Bavaria, or Côte d'Azur. Travel guides say that these words sound European to Japanese.

The family of the emperor, or Tenno, comes from Kyushu as well. This is also where the dynasties of the proud warrior class, the samurai, have their roots.
And there are a number of active volcanoes on Kyushu. One of the most famous is Mount Aso. Its caldera - the cauldron-like hollow at the top -- has a circumference of about 120 kilometers.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

Subscribe to:
DW Documentary:
DW Documental (Spanish):
DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

For more visit:

Instagram:

Facebook:


We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

Contest of the cathedrals – the Romanesque period | DW Documentary

Why did Christians start building cathedrals reaching to the sky 1000 years ago? Was it to demonstrate earthly power, or an attempt to be close to God? Whatever the reason, the resulting architecture still fascinates us today.

The Romanesque period still harbors many unsolved mysteries. For example, what led people at the turn of the millennium to build churches that towered into the sky, triggering competition among cities over cathedral size and splendor? This cathedral obsession is illustrated by the examples in Mainz, Worms and Speyer.

In St. John's Church in Mainz, a sarcophagus is opened after being sealed for 1,000 years. It’s the resting place of Archbishop Erkanbald, who built Mainz Cathedral, the largest religious building in the West at the time. It was hoped the cathedral would turn Mainz into a second Rome, promoting its archbishop to pope’s deputy. A short time later, King Conrad constructed a cathedral in Speyer, a burial place for his Salian dynasty. Its scope would befit the fact that God had installed the Salians as an imperial dynasty and therefore as supreme rulers of the world. Inevitably, there were conflicts between rulers and men of the church. But in Worms, another group established itself in the 12th Century quest for power: the emerging bourgeoisie. A new era began, in which the rigid power structures of the Romanesque period, reflected in its massive buildings, slowly broke down. As they did so, they left space for a new architectural style that honored openness and light: the Gothic.

Pat 2:

ـــــ
DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

Subscribe to:
DW Documentary:
DW Documental (Spanish):
DW Documentary وثائقية دي دبليو: (Arabic):

For more visit:

Instagram:

Facebook:


We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel:

Shares

x

Check Also

x

Menu