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Why Earth Science

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Why Earth Science?

Watch these 10 short videos explaining what we all should know about the science of the Earth — how the planet's land, water, air, and life systems interact. The American Geological Institute has developed these videos to bring to life the core concepts identified by the U.S. National Science Foundation-funded Earth Science Literacy Initiative ( For educational activities exploring each of the nine Big Ideas of Earth Science illustrated in the videos, visit Earth Science Week (

In Why Earth Science?, stunning video sequences and images illuminate the importance of knowing how Earth works and illustrate opportunities for careers in the Earth sciences.

What is Earth Science?

A quick look at the field of Earth Science, including the three main areas of study including astronomy, meteorology, and geology.
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Why Earth Science?

Introduction to Earth Science

This HD dramatic video choreographed to powerful music introduces the viewer/student to the wonder of Earth Science. It is designed as a motivational trailer to be shown in classrooms by Earth Science and Physical Science teachers in middle, high school and college as a visual Introduction to the beauty and complexity of the planet Earth.

Music is Imperatrix Mundi by Jo Blankenburg

Please rate this video and feel free to comment. If you like it, please help me spread the word by posting links on your media websites. The more students who can enjoy these dramatic videos, the better!

To view all of my videos in Biology, Earth Science, Astronomy, Chemistry and Physics, subscribe to my channel at: I will be releasing new videos periodically.

I wish to thank all the quality video and music producers whose postings enabled me to assemble this video for educational use. To best enjoy this video, turn up your speakers. The music is very powerful and dramatic!

I can customize this video to add your name or school name at the end credits, for a very modest fee. If interested, email me at fsgregs@comcast.net

Until recently, you were able to download my videos for free from my other video storage site (vimeo.com). Recently, however, they began charging a significant membership fee to enable that feature, so I regret that downloading from there is no longer available. However, you can search for and obtain free download addons for your browser that will allow you to download my videos from either YouTube or Vimeo.
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Earth Science: Crash Course History of Science #20

It's Earth Science time!!!! In this field, natural philosophers were asking questions like, what’s up with fossils? Are they the remains of extinct organisms? Or are they so-called “sports of nature”—rocks that just happen to look like living things but don’t /mean/ anything? And most importantly, how old is… everything?


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Everything You Need to Know About Planet Earth

Planet Earth is this solid thing you are standing on right now. In your everyday life you don't really waste a thought about how amazing this is. A giant, ancient, hot rock. How did it come into existence and how big is it really? You will be surprised. The ground you are standing on is just a very, very small part of the big picture.

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Videos, explaining things. Like evolution, time, space, global energy or our existence in this strange universe.
We are a team of designers, journalists and musicians who want to make science look beautiful. Because it is beautiful.

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Everything You Need to Know About Planet Earth

Help us caption & translate this video!

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Why Mars Died, and Earth Lived

Hey Everyone, You can find our 4K UHD content and more great space and science shows on:

The Mars rover, Curiosity, is the latest in a long line of missions to Mars: landers sent to scoop its soil and study its rocks, orbiters sent to map its valleys and ridges.

They are all asking the same question. Did liquid water once flow on this dry and dusty world? Did it support life in any form? And are there remnants left to find? The science that comes out of these missions may help answer a much larger, more philosophical question.

Is our planet Earth the norm, in a galaxy run through with life-bearing planets? Or is Earth a rare gem, with a unique make-up and history that allowed it to give rise to living things? On Mars, Curiosity has spotted pebbles and other rocks commonly associated with flowing water.

It found them down stream on what appears to be an ancient river fan, where water flowed down into Gale Crater. This shows that at some point in the past, Mars had an atmosphere, cloudy skies, and liquid water flowing. So what could have turned it into the desolate world we know today?

One process that very likely played a role goes by the unscientific name, sputtering. Like the other planets in our solar system, Mars is lashed by high-energy photons from the Sun. When one of these photons enters the atmosphere of a planet, it can crash into a molecule, knocking loose an electron and turning it into an ion. The solar wind brings something else: a giant magnetic field. When part of the field grazes the planet, it can attract ions and launch them out into space.

Another part might fling ions right into the atmosphere at up to a thousand kilometers per second. The ions crash into other molecules, sending them in all directions like balls in a game of pool. Over billions of years, this process could have literally stripped Mars of its atmosphere, especially in the early life of the solar system when the solar wind was more intense than it is today.

Sputtering has actually been spotted directly on another dead planet, Venus. The Venus Express mission found that solar winds are steadily stripping off lighter molecules of hydrogen and oxygen. They escape the planet on the night side... then ride solar breezes on out into space.

This process has left Venus with an atmosphere dominated by carbon dioxide gas... a heat trapping compound that has helped send surface temperatures up to around 400 degrees Celsius. The loss of Venus' atmosphere likely took place over millions of years, especially during solar outbursts known as coronal mass ejections.

If these massive blast waves stripped Venus and Mars of an atmosphere capable of supporting life how did Earth avoid the same grim fate? We can see the answer as the solar storm approaches earth. Our planet has what Mars and Venus lack - a powerful magnetic field generated deep within its core.

This protective shield deflects many of the high-energy particles launched by the Sun. In fact, that's just our first line of defense. Much of the solar energy that gets through is reflected back to space by clouds, ice, and snow.

The energy that earth absorbs is just enough to power a remarkable planetary engine: the climate. It's set in motion by the uneveness of solar heating, due in part to the cycles of day and night, and the seasons. That causes warm, tropical winds to blow toward the poles, and cold polar air toward the equator.

Wind currents drive surface ocean currents. This computer simulation shows the Gulf Stream winding its way along the coast of North America. This great ocean river carries enough heat energy to power the industrial world a hundred times over.

It breaks down in massive whirlpools that spread warm tropical waters over northern seas. Below the surface, they mix with cold deep currents that swirl around undersea ledges and mountains. Earth's climate engine has countless moving parts: tides and terrain, cross winds and currents -- all working to equalize temperatures around the globe.

Over time, earth developed a carbon cycle and an effective means of regulating green house gases. In our galaxy, are still-born worlds like Mars the norm? Or in Earth, has Nature crafted a prototype for its greatest experiment... Life?

Plate Tectonics Explained

How do plate tectonics REALLY work?

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Created by Henry Reich
Production and Writing Team: Alex Reich, Peter Reich, Emily Elert, Ever Salazar, Kate Yoshida, and Henry Reich
Music by Nathaniel Schroeder:

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MinuteEarth provides an energetic and entertaining view of trends in earth's environment -- in just a few minutes!

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References

Anderson, D. L. (2001). Top-down tectonics?. Science, 293(5537), 2016-2018.

Conrad, C. P., & Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. (2002). How mantle slabs drive plate tectonics. Science, 298(5591), 207-209. ftp://128.171.151.230/engels/Stanley/Textbook_update/Science_298/Conrad-02.pdf

Conrad, C.P., 2014. Personal Communication

Dietz, R. S. (1961). Continent and ocean basin evolution by spreading of the sea floor. Nature, 190(4779), 854-857.

Forsyth, D., & Uyeda, S. (1975). On the relative importance of the driving forces of plate motion. Geophysical Journal International, 43(1), 163-200.

Hecht, J. 2014, Aug 29. Earth's tectonic plates have doubled their speed. New Scientist.

Smil, V. 2007. Energy in Nature and Society: General Energetics of Complex Systems. MIT Press.

Driving forces of plate tectonics (website):

Why Earth and Planetary Sciences?

From environmental issues to planetary science, from field trips in the United States and abroad, Earth and Planetary Sciences offers a rigorous yet flexible educational experience. Featured students: Molly Chaney, Zoe Lefebvre, Amanda Stadermann, and Landis Powell.

Our Story in 6 Minutes

I have compressed billions of years into 6 minutes. This is our story as revealed by science.

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Earth and Environmental Science | Careers, Concentrations, and Courses

Part 2:

This video covers the Earth and Environmental science major and places an emphasis on earth science, soil science, geology, and hydrology. The Earth and Environmental Science major is a broad major that allows students a lot of flexibility in pursuing topics that most interest them.

In this video, you will be given an introduction to the major, and learn that Earth Science combines many fields into a unified physical science that covers topics such as the atmosphere, climate, ecology, soil science, environmental earth sciences, some aspects of geology, geophysics, plate tectonics, and hydrology.

This video will give you an introduction to the Earth Science major and will give you a brief overview of the courses and applications for Earth Science. Be sure to stick around and continue onto part two.
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► For more information on math, science, and engineering majors, check us out at

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Why I chose my major: Earth Sciences

Two University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering students talk about their interest in earth sciences and what they’re learning in their major.
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Earth Sciences at Cambridge

A brief look at the Earth Sciences course, part of the Natural Sciences Tripos at the University of Cambridge. How to apply:

The Earth: Crash Course Astronomy #11

Phil starts the planet-by-planet tour of the solar system right here at home, Earth.

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Table of Contents
Earth is a Planet 0:03
Layers of Earth 1:25
The Magnetic Field 5:10
Atmosphere and the Human Influence 6:14

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PHOTOS/VIDEOS
Planets:
Mercury:
Venus:
Earth:
Mars:
Jupiter:
Saturn: [credit: Photo by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute/Gordan Ugarkovic]
Uranus:
Neptune:

Ulaan Tsutgalan waterfall:
Perspective on a cloudy day: [credit: Oleg Artemyev]
Rain droplets:
Yellowston Mud Pot:
Sea otters holding hands:
Continental Drift: [credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio]
Mission to Bennu: [credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Image Lab]
[credit: San Diego Supercomputer Center / Nature]
Excerpt from Dynamic Earth [credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center]
Clouds:
Aurora Borealis: [credit: Fotograf Göran Strand]
Waves On Rocky Shore 1080 (2011):
A Year In The Life Of Earth’s CO2: [credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center]
NASA | 2014 Continues Long-Term Global Warming:

What is Earth Science?

A brief look at all of the things Earth Science encompasses as an introduction to our upcoming Careers and Research series.

Why not let us know what Earth Science is to you by commenting below or using #EarthScienceIs on social media - you can share with us on twitter (@GeoBus_StA), facebook (GeoBus St Andrews) or instagram (geobus_sta).

This video was produced by the GeoBus team in conjunction with researchers and staff at the University of St Andrews. Animation of the breakup of Pangea and movement of the Earth's tectonic plates is taken from the BBC documentary film Earth The Power Of The Planet .
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How Earth Moves

It’s here! Science stuff, mind-blowing stuff, Vsauce stuff, oh my!! THE CURIOSITY BOX:

Jake’s video about The Curiosity Box:

Minute Physics on why December days are the longest:

StandUpMaths on calendars and leap days:

Tom Scott on the Equation of Time:

My video on what would happen if the Earth stopped spinning:

GREAT visuals showing how Earth moves around the sun:



George Washington’s birthday:

real-time sub solar point location:

Lahaina noon images from the Oahu Astrophotography club:

analemma:

great solargraph and analemma images:

interactive seasons and ecliptic simulator:

Nasa video of seasonal movement of Earth:

Tropical year:

Earth rotation specifics:

How Earth moves through the universe:






minute physics on cab:

PBS spacetime on the cosmic microwave background:





CMB rest frame:




Wikipedia:










wikicommons images:





To explore space, I highly recommend these:




music by
and

Awesome 3D graphics by Eric Langlay:
Lame 2D stuff by me.

Earth's Rotation & Revolution: Crash Course Kids 8.1

So, have you ever wondered why we have seasons? Or maybe where the sun goes when it's night time? *Hint: It doesn't actually go anywhere* In this episode of Crash Course Kids, Sabrina talks about the Earth's rotation and revolution and how these things contribute to night and day and how Earth's tilt gives us seasons.

This first series is based on 5th grade science. We're super excited and hope you enjoy Crash Course Kids!

///Standards Used in This Video///
5-ESS1-2. Represent data in graphical displays to reveal patterns of daily changes in length and direction of shadows, day and night, and the seasonal appearance of some stars in the night sky. [Clarification Statement: Examples of patterns could include the position and motion of Earth with respect to the sun and selected stars that are visible only in particular months.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include causes of seasons.]

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Credits...

Executive Producers: John & Hank Green
Producer & Editor: Nicholas Jenkins
Cinematographer & Director: Michael Aranda
Host: Sabrina Cruz
Script Supervisor: Mickie Halpern
Writer: Kay Boatner
Consultant: Shelby Alinsky
Script Editor: Blake de Pastino

Thought Cafe Team:
Stephanie Bailis
Cody Brown
Suzanna Brusikiewicz
Jonathan Corbiere
Nick Counter
Kelsey Heinrichs
Jack Kenedy
Corey MacDonald
Tyler Sammy
Nikkie Stinchcombe
James Tuer
Adam Winnik

Earth Science Regents Review Pt 1

This is a brief review of topics and concepts asked on the most recent Earth Science Regents.

Earth Sciences - student views

From the enthusiasm of expert researchers to the educational and social benefits of field trips, hear why Earth Science students credit Bristol University with offering the best university education. Find out more about our courses online

Why did you study at UCL Earth Sciences?

Are you thinking of studying Earth Sciences? See what our students have to say about it here at UCL. This video is made with active students participation for prospective students.

Thinking of Studying at UCL Earth Sciences? Join us:



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Volcano Shot by: U.S. Geological Survey

Dinosaur animation by: Aybars Turan Modeling

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