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Why So Many Meteorites Come From The Same Place

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Why So Many Meteorites Come From The Same Place

Because of space physics, one faraway asteroid is likely the progenitor of almost a third of all the meteorites on Earth.

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If you want to learn more about this topic, start your googling with these keywords:
Asteroid: A rocky body smaller than a planet that is orbiting the sun.
Meteoroid: A smaller rocky body moving in the solar system.
Meteor: A meteoroid that has entered the Earth’s atmosphere.
Meteorite: A meteor that hits the Earth.
Orbital resonance: A force that occurs when orbiting bodies exert a regular, periodic gravitational influence on each other, because of the length of their relative orbits.
Kirkwood Gap: A dip in the distribution of main belt asteroids that correspond to the locations of orbital resonances with Jupiter.


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Script Writer: David Goldenberg (@dgoldenberg)
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Video Director: Emily Elert (@eelert)
Video Narrator: Emily Elert (@eelert)
With Contributions From: Henry Reich, Kate Yoshida, Ever Salazar, Peter Reich
Music by: Nathaniel Schroeder:

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If you liked this week’s video, we think you might also like:
A terrifying but fascinating look at the destructive power of potential meteorites:

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References:

Burbine, T., McCoy, T., Meibom, A., Royer, C., Gladman, B., and Keil, K. (2002). Meteoritic Parent Bodies: Their Number and Identification. Asteroids III. 653-667. Retrieved from:

Farinella, P., Gonczi, R., Froeschle, Ch., and Froeschle, C. (1993). The Injection of Asteroid Fragments into Resonances. Icarus. 101: 174-187. Retrieved from:

Fieber-Beyer, S., Gaffey, M., Bottke, W., and Hardersen, P. (2015). Potentially hazardous Asteroid 2007 LE: Compositional link to the black chondrite Rose City and Asteroid (6) Hebe. Icarus. 250: 430-437. Retrieved from:

Gaffey, M. and Gilbert, S. (1998). Asteroid 6 Hebe: The probable parent body of the H-type ordinary chondrites and the IIE iron meteorites. Meteoritics and Planetary Science. 33: 1281-1295. Retrieved from:

Vokrouhlicky, D., and Farinella, P. (2000). Efficient delivery of meteorites to the Earth from a wide range of asteroid parent bodies. Nature. 407: 606-608. Retrieved from:

Moons, M. and Morbidelli, A. (1995). Secular Resonances in Mean Motion Commensurabilities: The 4/1, 3/1, 5/2, and 7/3 Cases. Icarus. 114: 33-50. Retrieved from:

Burbine, Thomas. (2017). Assistant Professor of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts. Personal Communication.

How do we know some meteorites come from Vesta?

In this video, I answer a question from Omphemetse Mputle, who asks how we know diogenite meteorites come from the protoplanet Vesta. NOTE: I said we have a spacecraft orbiting Vesta, but that was a slip of the tongue; Dawn orbited Vesta for a little over a year, then left for Ceres in 2012.

[Also: Sorry about the audio quality; I'm having some issues with recording. Also, I just moved into this new office and haven't had time to set it up properly yet!]

Links:

Bad Astronomy Newsletter:

The Instagram photo of me touching the meteorite:

More about spectra:

Vesta:

Diogenites:

Wanna buy a meteorite? My friend Geoff Notkin sells 'em!
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The Only Confirmed Person Ever Struck By A METEORITE

Statistically speaking, except for winning the PowerBall lottery, there are few things less likely to ever happen to someone than getting hit by a meteorite. But once it happened!

Take the true story of Ann Hodges, the only confirmed person in history to have been hit by a meteorite, 65 years ago.

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What's inside a Meteorite?

We bought a $500 Meteorite only to cut it in half and put it in ACID! We also visited Meteor Crater in Winslow Arizona.

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This video took many days to create but that is the best part! Our traveling adventures build great memories for our family. Learning about the Widmanstatten lines in a meteorite was fascinating!

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Did A Meteorite Finally Reveal Life On Mars?

It's been debated for years whether there is life on Mars. Recently NASA scientists found evidence of water on a meteorite from the red planet! Dr. Ian O'Neill from Discovery News steps in to report on this finding, and reveal some of the possible implications.

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Read More:
NASA Scientists Find Evidence of Water in Meteorite, Reviving Debate Over Life on Mars

A team of scientists at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., has found evidence of past water movement throughout a Martian meteorite, reviving debate in the scientific community over life on Mars.

Mars Meteorite Structures: Optimism for Alien Life?

A meteorite from Mars has been studied up-close and scientists have detected tiny structures that could be interpreted as having a biological origin.

Yamato 000593

Yamato 000593 (or Y000593) is the second largest meteorite from Mars found on Earth.

Mars Exploration Program: Images


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New Big Bang Evidence

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Asteroids, Comets & Meteors: What’s the Difference?

There are millions of giant rocks hurtling around the the solar system. Some of them stay in the cosmos and others penetrate the Earth’s atmosphere. So how do you tell the difference between different types of space rocks?

The universe is kind of complicated, but Seeker has you covered. Each week, we’ll break down complex space terminology and phenomena using a very high tech medium… papier-mâché. You can get all kind of crafty in the cosmos with new episodes of Galactic Glossary every Wednesday.

An Asteroid Didn’t Kill the Dinosaurs, Here’s a New Theory About What Did

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Seeker inspires us to see the world through the lens of science and evokes a sense of curiosity, optimism and adventure.

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What Happens When a Meteorite Strikes Earth? -- Extreme Science #1

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Companion article on PopSci:

Really hope you liked this episode! There will be two more coming out so stay tuned! Special thanks to PopSci for giving me permission to put these on my channel.

***CREDITS***

Written, directed, hosted and edited by Jake Roper

Cinematography and VFX by Eric Langlay

Produced by Tim Willison

Sound Design by Jay Pellizzi

Special thanks to Cliff Ransom, PopSci and Toyota.

*I was not paid to put these on Vsauce3. I just was proud of them and wanted to share*

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The story of 'Oumuamua, the first visitor from another star system | Karen J. Meech

In October 2017, astrobiologist Karen J. Meech got the call every astronomer waits for: NASA had spotted the very first visitor from another star system. The interstellar comet -- a half-mile-long object eventually named `Oumuamua, from the Hawaiian for scout or messenger -- raised intriguing questions: Was it a chunk of rocky debris from a new star system, shredded material from a supernova explosion, evidence of alien technology or something else altogether? In this riveting talk, Meech tells the story of how her team raced against the clock to find answers about this unexpected gift from afar.

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Meteorite, Meteor: What's the Difference?

Space rocks come in all shapes and sizes. When debris from an asteroid or comet approaches Earth’s atmosphere, factors such as its flight path and whether it vaporizes before it hits the ground determines its scientific classification.

Learn the terminology surrounding meteors and know what to look for the next time a brilliant, falling object appears in the sky.

#asteroids #meteorites #space #solarsystem #space #astronomy #Earth

ASTEROID CRASH COURSE

Asteroids can be hazardous to life on Earth, but they also provide clues about the early solar system. In the Asteroid Crash Course video series, Denton Ebel, curator in the Museum's Division of Physical Sciences, explains how asteroids formed and the varying degrees of destruction they cause when they fall to Earth.

What is an Asteroid?


Why Are There No Planets in the Asteroid Belt?


What Were the Biggest Asteroids to Hit Earth?


Can Asteroids Be Deflected?


What Happens When Large Meteorites Fall to Earth?


How Are Large Asteroids Tracked?


VIDEO CREDITS:

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AMNH/J. Bauerle

VISUALIZATIONS
AMNH/Denver Museum of Nature & Science/GOTO, Inc. Tokyo, Japan/
Shanghai Science and Technology Museum, China
B612 Foundation

PHOTOGRAPHY
AMNH/Denis Finnin
James Baker
Linda Baker
Ralph P. Harvey/CWRU/Antarctic Search for Meteorites Program/NASA/NSF
NASA/JPL
Jongwoo Park

MUSIC
“Do It Sneaky” by Gijs van Amelsvoort

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Fresound/albaaa3, Felix Blume, stormpetrel, ingsey, Percy Duke, reg7783

COSMIC COLLISIONS
Cosmic Collisions was developed by the American Museum of Natural History, New York, in collaboration with the Denver Museum of Nature & Science; GOTO, Inc., Tokyo, Japan; and the Shanghai Science and Technology Museum, China.

Made possible through the generous support of CIT.

Cosmic Collisions was developed by the American Museum of Natural History with the major support and partnership of National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Science Mission Directorate, Heliophysics Division, grant number NNG04GC18G.

This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

© American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

The Interstellar Meteorite and Pieces of Theia

An exploration of the Hypatia stone, part of which may predate the formation of the solar system and might have been of interstellar origin, and a look at NWA 5400, a meteorite that may be a piece of Theia, the object that smacked into proto-earth during the formation of the moon.





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The Life of a Meteorite

The difference between meteorites, and meteoroids, and where they come from.
Come See the Accompanying Article at KidsKnowIt.com:

Space Rocks | What's the difference between an asteroid, a meteoroid, a meteorite, and a comet?

There are lots of names associated with space rocks, so what is the difference? Join the Royal Observatory Greenwich astronomers to find out. They will also explore what space rocks can tell us about our very own planet Earth.
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Meteorites and us

Humans have always been fascinated by meteorites - solid pieces of debris from comets, asteroids or meteoroids that originate from outer space and survive their passage through the atmosphere, landing on Earth's surface.

In this video Sean Blair talks about our relationship with these alien rocks - who has them? Why do they have them? How do they look after them?

Find out in the video originally created as part of ESA’s joint, live webcast with ESO for Asteroid Day 2018. Watch it here:

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Learn more:

What Is A Meteor, Meteorite, And Meteoroid?

#Meteor #Meteorite #Meteoroid #Astronomy #StarStuff

What is a meteor, meteorite, and meteoroid? What is a meteor shower? How many meteorites hit Earth and how fast do they travel? How are meteorites named? What is the biggest meteorite ever found?

Thanks for watching and keep looking up! ⭐️❤️

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Lobby Time by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License


Photos:
NASA
Wikimedia
Wikipedia
American Museum of Natural History
Gizmodo
Universe Today
Giphy
Planetary.org
National Geographic
Knownamibia.com
Travelark
New York Times
Te Ara
Yomiroalcielo.com

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Please watch: What Are Brown Dwarfs?

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Will We Ever Be Hit By an Asteroid?

So, will we ever be hit by one in the future? Yeah...
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Flat Earth: "Meteors, Meteorites, Comets, Craters" & The Dome

Meteoroids, meteorites, comets and craters are nothing as we've been told. This documentary is intended to solve the confusions many have about these topics and to explain all the possibilities for each and to show how these phenomenons actually go against Heliocentrism and support Flat Earth.

What Happens When Large Meteorites Fall to Earth?

If meteorites larger than 25 meters but smaller than one kilometer (approximately 1/2 mile) were to hit Earth, they would likely cause local damage to the impact area, including cratering, extreme waves, explosions, fire, and shattered glass from the sonic boom upon entering the earth's atmosphere.

Meteorite specialist Denton Ebel, Curator in the Division of Physical Sciences, compares impacts from Earth’s recent history.

#meteorites #craters #Earth #impacts #astronomy #astrophysics #solarsystem #space

ASTEROID CRASH COURSE

Asteroids can be hazardous to life on Earth, but they also provide clues about the early solar system. In the Asteroid Crash Course video series, Denton Ebel, curator in the Museum's Division of Physical Sciences, explains how asteroids formed and the varying degrees of destruction they cause when they fall to Earth.

What is an Asteroid?


Meteorite, Meteor: What’s the Difference?


Why Are There No Planets in the Asteroid Belt?


What Were the Biggest Asteroids to Hit Earth?


Can Asteroids Be Deflected?


How Are Large Asteroids Tracked?


VIDEO CREDITS

VIDEO
AMNH/J. Bauerle

VISUALIZATIONS
B612 FOUNDATION
NASA

PHOTOGRAPHY
AMNH/M. Shanley
Tim Evanson
Rich Mach
NASA
NASA/Peter Jenniskens

MUSIC
“Sentimental Hours” by Eberhard Schoener/
Warner Chappell Production Music

This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

© American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

What will happen if asteroids hit Earth

NASA tracks more than 10,000 Near Earth Objects (NEOs) in space. Millions of years ago, one of these NEOs hit Earth, wiping out the dinosaurs. No person has every been killed by one in recorded human history. Using Purdue University's Impact Earth and data from NASA, we calculated the destruction different size asteroids would cause if they hit land.

Produced by Kevin Reilly. Animations by Rob Ludacer. Special thanks to Julia Calderone.

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Why are Meteorites so Powerful!

Where does all the energy of the meteorites come from?After all there are just chunks of Rock coming from space.

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Tiny meteorites are everywhere. Here’s how to find them.

Tons of tiny meteorites fall to Earth every day, but are next to impossible to find once they land. At least, that’s what the science community thought. In this pilot episode of our “Trial & Error” experiment series, we go on a hunt for micrometeorites with the help of the amateur scientist who showed the world that they truly could be found.

Special thanks to Alessandra Potenza for her help reporting this story.

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