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Why The Coronavirus May Forever Change Grocery Shopping | WSJ

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Why The Coronavirus May Forever Change Grocery Shopping | WSJ

Will the coronavirus pandemic lead to long-term changes in how we shop for food? To better understand the challenges facing grocery stores, WSJ’s Alexander Hotz spoke with an industry insider, a store owner and a Walmart executive.

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Why The Coronavirus May Forever Change Grocery Shopping WSJ

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Will COVID Forever Change How Americans Shop?

CORONAVIRUS

The coronavirus pandemic has significantly changed America’s consumer behavior.

People change their buying habits, stock up on groceries and household items and resort to online shopping. And experts believe these changes will be long-lasting for both consumers and sellers.

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Why Apple Store Closures May Tell Us Where Covid-19 Will Hit Next | WSJ

Apple has consistently been one of the first retailers to close its doors in areas of the U.S. just as they see a surge in Covid-19 cases. WSJ tracked hundreds of store closures, coronavirus statistics and lockdown measures to piece together Apple’s shutdown strategy. Illustration: John McColgan

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The Future of Cities After Covid-19 | WSJ

The coronavirus pandemic could have a lasting impact on city life. WSJ’s Jaden Urbi explores how the ways we work, shop and play are changing as urban designers refocus on health, tech and open spaces. Illustration: Zoë Soriano

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Has COVID-19 Changed How We Shop for Food?

From empty grocery shelves to more home cooking and baking, how has the pandemic affected the way Ontarians shop for food and what they eat. Will these changes be lasting? We ask Sylvain Charlebois, scientific director, Agri-Food Analytics Lab at Dalhousie University; Jackie Fraberts, owner operator of the family-run grocery store Fraberts Fresh Food; and Marion Chan of TrendSpotter Consulting, which specializes in consumer behaviour in the food, beverage, and foodservice industries.

How shopping will change | COVID-19 Ask an Expert

Marketing and retail expert Brynn Winegard answers your questions on what shopping will look like once COVID-19 restrictions are lifted.

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College-Town Economies Brace for Covid Blow | WSJ

The coronavirus has pushed nearly half of U.S. colleges and universities into some degree of remote learning, a change that’s sending shock waves through small college town economies. WSJ’s Carlos Waters explains.

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Will COVID Forever Change How Americans Shop ?

Experts believe these changes will be long-lasting for both consumers and sellers

Stew Leonard CEO on how the coronavirus has changed the grocery industry

Stew Leonard Jr., president and CEO of Stew Leonard's, joins Squawk on the Street to discuss the ways the grocery chain is managing the coronavirus outbreak.

Amazon will begin to put new grocery delivery customers on a wait-list and curtail shopping hours at some Whole Foods stores to prioritize orders from existing customers buying food online during the coronavirus outbreak, the company said on Sunday.

Many shoppers recently seeking to purchase groceries from the Seattle-based ​e-commerce company found they could not place orders due to a lack of available delivery slots. Amazon said it would have to relegate all new online grocery customers to a wait-list starting Monday while working on adding capacity each week.

In recent weeks, it increased the number of Whole Foods stores offering grocery pickup ​to more than 150 locations, up from 80 previously.

Amazon ​also plans to shorten some Whole Foods stores’ hours for the public so its employees can more quickly fulfill online grocery orders, the company said.

The moves illustrate how the world’s largest online retailer, which showed its ambition to enter the grocery industry by acquiring Whole Foods for $13.7 billion in August 2017, is now leveraging its presence both online and in physical stores to handle high demand from consumers who are stuck eating at home, with many restaurant dining rooms closed to the public.

Amazon offers grocery delivery services Amazon Fresh and Amazon Prime Now from its own warehouses and Whole Foods stores. It typically touts ultra-fast delivery within hours, ​with shoppers able to choose a delivery window. Last month, Amazon temporarily suspended the Prime Pantry delivery service, which sells non-perishable groceries.

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2021 Trend Predictions Part 5: Online Grocery Shopping

In an era of more videoconferencing, people yearn for human contact. And that will be the supermarket of tomorrow.

A survey conducted by Mercatus on shopper behavior of almost 60,000 respondents throughout the US, and just published, reported, based on the shopper responses, that Mercatus predicts that online grocery will count for 21.5% of grocery sales by 2025 – that’s $250 billion in sales.

The Mercatus Survey also found that :
62% are shopping online due to Covid 19
43% shopped online in last 6 months – but only 26% at their preferred grocer – a very telling stat that should be alarming and be a wake up call to grocers.

And the great news - that 78% still prefer to visit a brick and mortar store to shop in store or curbside pick up.

Here’s what I’ve learned since the beginning of Covid-19 and here’s my vision of the future of e-commerce and grocery – and it’s a hybrid of an online experience and an in-store experience.

Shoppers will go online to your grocery store website and first make a reservation, same as they do now at Open Table, or another reservation app or at a specific restaurant’s website for a particular day and time.

This will allow your store to plan and predict for social distancing and lower in-store traffic. Your shopper will then automatically be redirected to shop on line – for those unemotional jars, boxes and packages – those name brands, or store branded products, that they can’t live without. No doubt the website will be populated with previous purchases to speed up the process along with personalized inputs by shopper that will specify and produce their preferred product needs and desires – low fat, low carb, gluten-free, vegan, salt-free, low sugar, religious preferences and scores more that make the experience quick, efficient, targeted and of course personalized.

The physical store, now at approximately 40,000 square feet, will be cut in half. The back half, closed to shoppers – a dark store if you will, will be fully robotic and will pick those groceries ordered online and send them by conveyor to a pick up area at the front of the store at the time of your reservation. The online shopping experience will change dramatically with full disclosure and listing of ingredients, sourcing, nutritional information and even allowing shoppers to view food and beverage packaging in 3D. A Harris Poll study shows that 60% of online shoppers say they’re more likely to buy a product if it’s shown in 3D or Augmented Reality. It’s all about transparency and information. 

At your reservation time you will enter the store – no lines out front, but still wearing a mask, and you WILL be impressed. All those delicious fruits and vegetables, all that fresh bakery products, the cheese table, the meat counter, the deli and freshly prepared foods will all be there. The products that today, receive the most quality complaints from those who order online.

Shoppers will be able to consult with their retail dietitians, talk to the butcher, the baker, the fish monger and focus on an exciting fresh shopping experience. Pick their foods, and on the way out pick up those foods they ordered online.

Reducing the time in store – and focused on the “best” of the shopping experience –and increasing the value of the experience. The best of both worlds – and will finally allow retailers to have ecommerce be profitable.

Borough Market presents Trading Places: Will COVID-19 change our relationship with food forever?

Lockdown and the COVID-19 pandemic have put the challenges and pressure-points of where, and how, we get our food into sharp focus. This event in partnership with Borough Market considers how consumers have access to ‘good’, ‘healthy’ or ‘cheap’ food in our mid/post COVID-19 world, and explores the role of supermarkets, local markets, community shops, delivery services, small producers and more.

With managing director at Borough Market Darren Henaghan; founding director of the Sustainable Food Trust Patrick Holden; food writer Jenny Linford and Bite Back 2030 youth activist Tasha Mhakayakora. Chaired by Food Season guest director Angela Clutton.


Darren Henaghan is Managing Director of Borough Market. Borough Market is rich with history, but it remains as relevant now as it has ever been. As London’s oldest food market, it has been serving the people of Southwark for 1,000 years, and that extraordinary heritage is an important part of its appeal.

Patrick Holden is founder and chief executive of the Sustainable Food Trust, an organisation working internationally to accelerate the transition towards more sustainable food systems.

Jenny Linford is a food writer and author of over 15 books including The Missing Ingredient - the Curious Role of Time in Food and Flavour, an innovative exploration of time, the 'invisible' ingredient, and The Chef's Library, featuring the favourite cookbook choices of over seventy acclaimed international chefs.

Tasha Mhakayakora is co-chair of the Bite Back 2030 Youth Board. Tasha is 18, from Lewisham and is an asylum seeker from Zimbabwe. She is passionate about changing the way we talk about obesity and creating equal opportunities for everyone to have access to healthier food options. In 2015 Tasha encouraged her school to sign up to the Sugar Smart Pledge and is keen to join Bite Back and finish what she started. Bite Back 2030 is a youth led movement who want healthy, nutritious food to be an option for every child and young person, because it matters to their health.

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COVID-19: How Can You Safely Grocery Shop? Here's What Experts Suggest | TIME

As COVID-19 spreads globally, grocery shopping has become one of the most anxiety-producing yet necessary activities for millions of people around the world.

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How Can You Safely Grocery Shop in the Time of COVID-19? Here's What Experts Suggest

How the Pandemic Could Transform Higher Ed | WSJ

Will the coronavirus pandemic lead to long-term changes in higher education? To better understand the challenges facing U.S. colleges and universities, WSJ’s Alexander Hotz spoke with administrators, students, and a higher education futurist. Photo: Robert F. Bukaty/AP

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What to Expect When You Fly in the Future | WSJ

Air travel is full of opportunities for coronavirus transmission. Touchless check-in, plexiglass shields, temperature checks, back-to-front boarding and planes with empty middle seats are all now part of the flying experience, and the future may bring even more changes. Illustration: Alex Kuzoian

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How Covid-19 has changed the royals forever

Coronavirus has changed nearly everyone's lives in one way or another and the Royal Family is no exception. Even though they were not able to carry out their formal engagements in person, The Telegraph's Hannah Furness explain how they kept calm and carried on over the internet.

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Telegraph.co.uk and YouTube.com/TelegraphTV are websites of The Telegraph, the UK's best-selling quality daily newspaper providing news and analysis on UK and world events, business, sport, lifestyle and culture.

How the Pandemic Is Changing Our Commute | WSJ

Traveling on trains and buses means potential exposure to the coronavirus, so cities are racing to make their public transit systems safe. WSJ explores how things like sanitizing robots, working from home and expanded bike lanes are changing our commutes. Video/Illustration: Jaden Urbi and Zoë Soriano

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How Covid Has Changed Black Friday, Possibly Forever

Nov.24 -- Black Friday may never be the same thanks to the Covid-19 pandemic. Bloomberg's Ritika Gupta explains how retailers are changing.

COVID-19 changing where and how we buy groceries

WAVY News 10's Chris Horne reports.

How COVID-19 has changed our shopping habits

The coronavirus outbreak has changed consumer's shopping habits.

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