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Why We Might Not Need A Vaccine for COVID-19 | This Morning

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Why We Might Not Need A Vaccine for COVID-19 | This Morning

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Leading oncologist Professor Karol Sikora raised eyebrows this week when he said a coronavirus vaccine might not be needed. Making the comments on Twitter, the Professor said Covid-19 could 'peter out' before a much-awaited vaccine arrives. But is he right? And what do the new testing rules mean for us?
Broadcast on 19/05/20

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New warning from Dr. Fauci about potential effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccine l GMA

Dr. Anthony Fauci announces a new warning about the effectiveness of developing a COVID-19 vaccine as cases top 6.3 million around the world.
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Coronavirus Vaccine Is Already In Human Trials | This Morning

After the UK’s daily death rate has dropped to its lowest figure since before lockdown, could some good news finally be on the horizon? As it’s revealed that pharmaceutical giant Astrazeneca hope to deliver hundreds of millions of vaccine doses to EU countries before the end of the year, and with the announcement that pubs in Northern Ireland will open from 3rd July, Dr Philippa discusses the science behind this and other recent developments.
Broadcast on 16/06/20
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Dr Zoe and Dr Ranj answer all your health questions, stay stylish with Gok Wan's fabulous fashion, be beautiful with Bryony Blake's top make-up tips, and save money with Martin Lewis.




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Scientists in China claim a new drug could stop Covid-19 without a vaccine

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Scientists at China’s Peking University claim they have been developing a drug that could bring the Covid-19 pandemic to a halt.

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Is this the solution to the COVID-19 vaccine?

Professor Angus Dalgliesh believes he may have found a solution to the coronavirus vaccine, a drug he has used on cancer patients which boosts their immune system. He believes this drug should be used on NHS front line workers to help prevent them from getting coronavirus.

Dalgliesh’s drug hasn’t been put through clinical trials on COVID-19 patients yet and may not work, with the government believing that the drug should be tested on animals first.

Read more about COVID-19: Mum, 66, dies days after caring for coronavirus-hit sons as youngest fights for life -

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Moderna Coronavirus Vaccine Is Tested On 8 Humans With Encouraging Results | TODAY

The results of one small study on a possible coronavirus vaccine with humans are in, and they appear to show encouraging results. Reporting for TODAY, NBC News medical correspondent Dr. John Torres says “we’re keeping our fingers crossed.”
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Moderna Coronavirus Vaccine Is Tested On 8 Humans With Encouraging Results | TODAY

WHO on a COVID-19 Vaccine and Treatment

WHO Chief Scientist Soumya Swaminathan said phase three of COVID-19 vaccine trials were underway, adding “I'm hopeful, I'm optimistic, but you know vaccine development is a complex undertaking.”

Swaminathan said phase 3 is the phase which will “definitively prove whether a vaccine is efficacious and safe.” She said vaccine development comes with a lot of uncertainty and added, “The good thing is we have many different vaccine candidates and platforms. So even if the first one fails or the second fails, we shouldn't lose hope. We shouldn't give up.

The Chief Scientist said WHO was working on a “fair allocation mechanism” and noted that discussions were underway with countries on how to share a limited supply of vaccine. She explained, “Let's say you have fifty or a hundred million doses at the end of this year. Okay. How should the world share that? Should it go only to the countries which have paid for it or are capable of paying for it, to cover their own populations? Or should it go to protect frontline health workers or the most vulnerable people, whether they are the elderly or whether there are people with other diseases and certainly frontline workers, health workers, but also other kinds of first responders are at the highest risk as we've seen, unfortunately.

Swaminathan said data analysis by the recovery trial safety monitoring board found that there is no benefit in the use of hydroxychloroquine on mortality in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. She added, “Where there is still a gap is: Does it have any role at all in prevention? Or in minimizing the severity of the illness in early infection? Or even in preventing infection? We don't know that as yet, and we need to complete those large trials and get the data so again, we have a definite answer on that.

The Chief Scientist said the global community want to know if a drug reduces mortality or not to determine whether or not to use it. She said there is a similar situation now with Lopinavir, Ritonovir now which is currently being studied. She said there were some 3,000 patients in the Lopinavir, Ritonovir arm and a similar number in the standard of care arm of the trial; “so, this is already a huge number and should be enough to tell us whether this drug is actually having a mortality benefit or a benefit in reducing the severity of the illness.

(Excepts from interview)

Why the race for a COVID-19 vaccine is complicated

Pharmaceutical companies and governments around the world are chasing a coronavirus vaccine, fast tracking the usually years-long vaccine development procedure to a few months. ProPublica reporter Caroline Chen joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the ambitious timeline and the unpredictability of the clinical trials.
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First human trials of potential coronavirus vaccine developed in Adelaide about to begin | ABC News

The first human trials of a potential coronavirus vaccine developed in Australia are underway in Adelaide.

If successful, a vaccine will be available from next year.

But researchers have warned Australia may be left without supplies if the United States buys up big as it's done with the only drug which is licensed to treat COVID-19.

Stacey Lee reports.

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Bill Gates on Finding a Vaccine for COVID-19, the Economy, and Returning to ‘Normal Life’

Microsoft founder and philanthropist Bill Gates had an informative conversation with Ellen about his foundation’s efforts to help find a vaccine and therapeutics for COVID-19, the effect the pandemic is having on the economy, when we can expect to get back to “normal life,” and what gives him hope during these uncertain times.

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Covid-19 Vaccine Volunteer Reveals Why He's Putting Himself at Risk | Good Morning Britain

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We have an exclusive interview with one of the first people in the UK helping scientists in their efforts to find a Covid-19 vaccine.
Jack Sommers volunteered to take part in the Oxford trials after losing his job and today reveals why he wanted to put himself at risk taking the vaccine.

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Vaccine Development Update

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Timeline





Oxford AZ vaccine

‘All of the 6 vaccinated monkeys treated with the Oxford vaccine became infected when challenged’

‘That viral loads in the noses of vaccinated and unvaccinated animals were identical’

Less severe clinical symptoms than unvaccinated animals

Neutralising antibody titres were low, insufficient to prevent infection

Insufficient to prevent viral shedding in nasal secretions

Human trials began in April with a non-vaccinated control group

2 groups now undergoing antibody studies

Results in a few months

Now preparing for 30,000 subjects, including elderly and children

New vaccines risk antibody-induced enhancement

This effect caused serious lung damage in animals given experimental vaccines for both SARS-1 and MERS.


Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, immunity and vaccine





Two studies,
Infection prevents reinfection.

Prototype vaccines protected against SARS-CoV-2

Antibodies do provide protection, whether they are triggered by an infection or a vaccine.

Study 1

Researchers infected 9 adult monkeys, noses and lungs

Virus quickly spread into their upper and lower respiratory tracts

All 9 developed viral pneumonia

All recovered within 28 days.

A week later, re-exposed, none of the animals got sick

Immunity passports

Study 2

35 monkeys

25 vaccinated (2 doses), 10 not vaccinated

One of six prototypes of DNA vaccines

All prototype vaccines used the genetic code for portions of the protein that CoV-2 uses to invade cells

All of the vaccinated monkeys developed antibodies, some at recovered monkey level

6 candidate DNA vaccines induced neutralizing antibody

3 weeks after the second vaccine dose,

All monkeys inoculated with COVID-19

25 vaccinated and 10 not vaccinated

None of the vaccinated monkeys developed high levels of the virus in their lungs

All 10 of the unvaccinated monkeys did

8 of the 25 vaccinated demonstrated no detectable virus at any point

17 monkeys showed low levels of virus

Higher antibody levels were linked to lower viral loads

Therefore, lab test for risk of infection can be developed

Questions
Does this all apply to humans?
How long will the naturally or vaccine acquired immunity last?

A COVID-19 vaccine may not be enough to stop the spread of the virus, says Dr. Anthony Fauci

A stunning warning from the nation's top infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, says even when a vaccine for COVID-19 is developed, it may not be enough to stop the spread of the virus.

Dr. Fauci says it's critical that the U.S. does everything it can to encourage Americans to get the vaccine as
the vaccine is likely to only be about 70 percent effective,

Moreover, two recent polls found only about 70 percent of Americans plan to get it and that's not enough to create herd immunity, which is when a large amount of the population is immune so the virus is unable to spread.

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This segment aired on June 29, 2020.

Moderna shares rise following Dr. Fauci's comments on Covid-19 vaccine data

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the White House’s top U.S. infectious disease expert, said Friday he is cautiously optimistic about Moderna's early-stage vaccine trial results. CNBC's Meg Tirrell reports.

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Can we get a vaccine for COVID-19 by next year?

More than 130 labs around the world are working to develop a COVID-19 vaccine. But what would it take to vaccinate everyone by early next year?

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When will Canadians get a COVID-19 vaccine, and will there be enough? | The Weekly with Wendy Mesley

With dozens of COVID-19 vaccine candidates in development around the world, a massive challenge looms on the horizon: deciding who gets access to a successful vaccine first, and whether countries can produce enough for everyone. Wendy Mesley speaks to two people leading two of the most promising made-in-Canada vaccines about how to make sure everyone gets access.

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For more than 75 years, CBC News has been the source Canadians turn to, to keep them informed about their communities, their country and their world. Through regional and national programming on multiple platforms, including CBC Television, CBC News Network, CBC Radio, CBCNews.ca, mobile and on-demand, CBC News and its internationally recognized team of award-winning journalists deliver the breaking stories, the issues, the analyses and the personalities that matter to Canadians.

How Moderna became the frontrunner for coronavirus vaccine

CNBC's Kelly Evans discusses Moderna and it's vaccine development plans with Greg Zuckerman, senior writer at the Wall Street Journal. For more coronavirus live updates:

Moderna’s stock fell by as much as 9.4% in midday trading Thursday after a report said the biotech company’s late-stage trial for a potential coronavirus vaccine will be delayed, possibly by a few weeks.

The company, which is working with the National Institutes of Health, was expected to begin a phase 3 trial with 30,000 participants for its vaccine candidate later this month, pending the results from its midstage trial.

However, the company is making changes to the trial plan, which has pushed back the expected start date, according to health-care publication STAT News, citing an investigator. STAT News said it’s unclear how long the start date will be delayed.

“My understanding was that they wanted to get the first vaccines given in July, and they say they’re still committed to do that,” one investigator told STAT News. “As best I can tell, they’re close to being on target for that.”

In response to the report, Moderna CEO Stephane Bancel told CNBC’s Meg Tirrell, “we have always said July. And I confirm July.”

The shares recovered some of the losses but still down by more than 5% in afternoon trading.

Moderna’s experimental vaccine contains genetic material called messenger RNA, or mRNA. The mRNA is a genetic code that tells cells what to build — in this case, an antigen that may induce an immune response to the virus. It became the first candidate to enter a phase 1 human trial in March.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, that nation’s leading infectious disease expert, has often touted the potential vaccine.

In May, the company released data from its early-stage trial, which showed the vaccine produced neutralizing antibodies against Covid-19 in at least eight participants. The vaccine also produced binding antibodies in all participants.

The effort by Moderna is one of several working on a potential vaccine for Covid-19, which has infected more than 10 million people and killed at least 516,970, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. More than 100 vaccines are under development globally, according to the World Health Organization. At least 17 vaccines are already in clinical trials, according to the WHO.

On Wednesday, Pfizer released positive results from its closely watched early-stage human trial of a coronavirus vaccine.

The delay by Moderna could set back its goal of delivering data on whether its vaccine is safe and effective by the end of the year. If all goes well with Moderna’s next trial, the vaccine could be available for public distribution by the end of December or early 2021.

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Coronavirus: Pfizer, BioNTech see early positive results for vaccine candidate

A new report suggests that the Covid-19 vaccine being developed by Pfizer and BioNTech is showing positive results in current trials. CNBC's Meg Tirrell  reports. For access to live and exclusive video from CNBC subscribe to CNBC PRO:

Pfizer shares jumped 4% Wednesday after it released positive results from its closely watched early stage human trial of a coronavirus vaccine.

The trial evaluated 45 people. Each participant received 10, 30 or 100 microgram doses of the vaccine or a placebo.

The company said one of its four coronavirus vaccine candidates produced neutralizing antibodies, which researchers believe is necessary to build immunity to the virus, in all participants who received two of the 10 or 30 microgram doses after 28 days, according to the preliminary data. The findings were posted in a paper released on MedRXiv. The company said the levels of neutralizing antibodies were 1.8 to 2.8 times higher than in recovered Covid-19 patients.

After 28 days, all participants in the two lower-dose groups had significant levels of binding antibodies, the company said.

“We are encouraged by the clinical data of BNT162b1, one of four mRNA constructs we are evaluating clinically, and for which we have positive, preliminary, topline findings,” Kathrin Jansen, head of Pfizer’s vaccine research and development, said in a press release. “We are dedicated to develop potentially groundbreaking vaccines and medicines, and in the face of this global health crisis, we approach this goal with the utmost urgency.”

The U.S.-based pharmaceutical giant has been working alongside German drugmaker BioNTech. The companies’ experimental vaccine contains genetic material called messenger RNA, or mRNA. The mRNA is a genetic code that tells cells what to build — in this case, an antigen that may induce an immune response to the virus.

Pfizer said the vaccine was generally well tolerated, though the experimental vaccine caused fever in some patients, especially for those who were in the 100 microgram group. Most patients reported pain at the injection site, which was mild to moderate, the company said, except in one of 12 subjects who received a 100 microgram dose, which was severe.

The findings posted Wednesday have not been peer-reviewed yet.

The effort by Pfizer and BioNTech is one of several working on a potential vaccine to prevent Covid-19, which has infected more than 10 million people worldwide and killed at least 511,851, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. There are more than 100 vaccines currently under development, according to the World Health Organization.

Another leading vaccine candidate from biotech firm Moderna is expected to enter a late-stage trial later this month, pending the results from its mid-stage trial. If all goes well in Moderna’s next trial, its vaccine could be available for public distribution by the end of the year.

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Scientist says a coronavirus vaccine in just 12 months is 'fake news' | 60 Minutes Australia

Subscribe here: Full Episodes here | A shot in the dark (2020)

Right now, there’s one thing all eight billion people on earth are wishing for: A vaccine for COVID-19. Political leaders everywhere, sweating on getting us to the other side of the pandemic, boldly promise it’ll happen within 12 to 18 months. But why should they be so optimistic? After all, vaccines normally take decades to formulate and manufacture, and quite often success never comes. As Liam Bartlett finds out, some scientists say talk of a coronavirus vaccine is not only raising false hope, it’s fake news.

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For forty years, 60 Minutes have been telling Australians the world’s greatest stories. Tales that changed history, our nation and our lives. Reporters Liz Hayes, Allison Langdon, Tara Brown, Charles Wooley, Liam Bartlett and Sarah Abo look past the headlines because there is always a bigger picture. Sundays are for 60 Minutes.

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Moderna Covid-19 vaccine trial delayed, July start still possible: Report

Moderna’s stock fell 8% on Thursday after a report said the biotech company’s late-stage trial for a potential coronavirus vaccine will be delayed. CNBC's Meg Tirrell reports. For more coronavirus live updates:

Moderna’s stock fell by as much as 9.4% in midday trading Thursday after a report said the biotech company’s late-stage trial for a potential coronavirus vaccine will be delayed, possibly by a few weeks.

The company, which is working with the National Institutes of Health, was expected to begin a phase 3 trial with 30,000 participants for its vaccine candidate later this month, pending the results from its midstage trial.

However, the company is making changes to the trial plan, which has pushed back the expected start date, according to health-care publication STAT News, citing an investigator. STAT News said it’s unclear how long the start date will be delayed.

“My understanding was that they wanted to get the first vaccines given in July, and they say they’re still committed to do that,” one investigator told STAT News. “As best I can tell, they’re close to being on target for that.”

In response to the report, Moderna CEO Stephane Bancel told CNBC’s Meg Tirrell, “we have always said July. And I confirm July.”

The shares recovered some of the losses but still down by more than 5% in afternoon trading.

Moderna’s experimental vaccine contains genetic material called messenger RNA, or mRNA. The mRNA is a genetic code that tells cells what to build — in this case, an antigen that may induce an immune response to the virus. It became the first candidate to enter a phase 1 human trial in March.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, that nation’s leading infectious disease expert, has often touted the potential vaccine.

In May, the company released data from its early-stage trial, which showed the vaccine produced neutralizing antibodies against Covid-19 in at least eight participants. The vaccine also produced binding antibodies in all participants.

The effort by Moderna is one of several working on a potential vaccine for Covid-19, which has infected more than 10 million people and killed at least 516,970, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. More than 100 vaccines are under development globally, according to the World Health Organization. At least 17 vaccines are already in clinical trials, according to the WHO.

On Wednesday, Pfizer released positive results from its closely watched early-stage human trial of a coronavirus vaccine.

The delay by Moderna could set back its goal of delivering data on whether its vaccine is safe and effective by the end of the year. If all goes well with Moderna’s next trial, the vaccine could be available for public distribution by the end of December or early 2021.

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