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Why do we sleep? | Russell Foster

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Why do we sleep? | Russell Foster

Russell Foster is a circadian neuroscientist: He studies the sleep cycles of the brain. And he asks: What do we know about sleep? Not a lot, it turns out, for something we do with one-third of our lives. In this talk, Foster shares three popular theories about why we sleep, busts some myths about how much sleep we need at different ages -- and hints at some bold new uses of sleep as a predictor of mental health.

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TED talk summary: Russell Foster - Why do we sleep?

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One more reason to get a good night’s sleep | Jeff Iliff

The brain uses a quarter of the body's entire energy supply, yet only accounts for about two percent of the body's mass. So how does this unique organ receive and, perhaps more importantly, rid itself of vital nutrients? New research suggests it has to do with sleep.

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more.
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Why We Sleep with Matthew Walker PART 1

In this episode Dr Chatterjee talks to world-leading sleep researcher, author of the international best-selling book Why We Sleep and Professor of Neuroscience and Psychology at the University of California, Matthew Walker. They discuss everything you ever needed to know about sleep in this 2-Part interview. In Part 1, they discuss brilliant tips to combat jet lag, explain how sleep can enhance athletic performance and decrease risk of injury and reveal just how much caffeine consumption can impact sleep. Finally, they explore the reasons behind the current global sleep-loss epidemic and the effect that this is having on our health.

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Why Do We Sleep?

Can we ever answer this age old question of sleep?

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Music by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0


Original Script:
Have you ever sat back and wondered why we spend a third of our life laying down unconsciously? I mean when you think about it, it sounds like a giant waste of time. So why do we do it? Why does almost every living creature do it, too? As with most answers to age old questions: No one really knows. However, there are a lot of good solid theories that can explain the phenomenon of sleep. One of the oldest theories (and in my opinion most inaccurate) is the inactivity theory that implies animals sleep at night in order to stay out of harms way. Basically, since it is unsafe to be outside at night due to nocturnal predators, animals sleep instead. I don’t know about you, but if I knew there were vicious hunters right outside my mouse hole, I’d rather be awake and ready to run instead of unconscious. This theory has fallen out of liking among most sleep scholars in favor of the more recent and logical theories. The most popular and obvious reason we sleep is for restoration. Sleep just makes us feel better! There have been various studies to show that sleeping fuels our immune system, heals our wounds, and reduces cancer growth. During sleep, our cells restore and repair themselves as well as fight off infections. One of the newer theories is that sleep helps us process memories. That mostly explains why it’s really hard to remember stuff if you haven’t slept well in a few days. The most recent and interesting theory is that sleep allows the brain to actually change form. This newly discovered phenomenon is called brain plasticity because our brains are actually mold-able like plastic. Although brain plasticity is not fully understood, it happens the most during sleeping hours. New neuronal connections are formed and old ones are destroyed. This is basically the brains way of taking out the trash and building new networks at the same time. So among all of these theories of sleep, which one makes the most sense to you?
You can leave me a comment or tweet at me to @KnowledgeLiving.

Russell Foster on how sleep science explains eye disease and mental health | Health | WIRED

Russell Foster, professor of circadian neuroscience at the University of Oxford, wants to change your views, thoughts and ideas about sleep.
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Sleep is still in many regards a mystery for scientists. However, Professor Foster, who spoke at WIRED Health, is working in new areas of neuroscience that are finding links between our sleep cycles and the state of our mental health, which could drastically change the way we think about sleep.

WIRED Health is a one-day summit designed to introduce, explain and predict the coming trends facing the medical and personal healthcare industries. This ambitious inaugural event was held on Tuesday April 29, at the new home of the Royal College of General Practitioners, 30 Euston Square, London.

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WIRED brings you the future as it happens - the people, the trends, the big ideas that will change our lives. An award-winning printed monthly and online publication. WIRED is an agenda-setting magazine offering brain food on a wide range of topics, from science, technology and business to pop-culture and politics.

Russell Foster on how sleep science explains eye disease and mental health | Health | WIRED
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Why Do We Need Sleep? - ScienceFACTionShow

Sleeping is the most important thing we need to do to get energy. However, why do we need so much sleep and what can happen if we don't get enough. Watch to find out!

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Russell Foster: What is Sleep?

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The science of how much sleep you actually need

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Getting plenty of sleep each night is important to maintaining a healthy and productive life. But how much sleep do you actually need?

Joe Avella and Jessica Orwig tackle this question on the Facebook series Science the $#!* out of it.

For the average adult, the National Sleep Foundation recommends 7 to 9 hours of sleep a night.

Today, however, many Americans are sleep-deprived, which can have significant adverse effects on physical and cognitive functions.

The reason why some people don’t get enough sleep can be accredited to busy modern lifestyles. But there are other reasons too.

It turns out habits such as using electronic devices or drinking alcohol right before bedtime can be detrimental to getting a good night’s sleep.

Learn more on how to get better sleep on this episode of Science the $#!* out of it. Watch the whole series:

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The brain-changing benefits of exercise | Wendy Suzuki

What's the most transformative thing that you can do for your brain today? Exercise! says neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki. Get inspired to go to the gym as Suzuki discusses the science of how working out boosts your mood and memory -- and protects your brain against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's.

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Why Do We Dream? | TNTM

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HuffPost Science's Jacqueline Howard investigates how to make sense of dreaming and recent sleep research.

HuffPost Science invites you to join the discussion with top scientists covering the latest news in spaceflight, brain/body research, evolution, and the influence of science on culture.

Sleep Disruption & Mental Illnesses - Russell Foster

Russell Foster, Professor at Oxford Sleep and Circadien Neuroscience Institute was speaking during the Dreem Sleep Conference on how and why sleep disruption occurs and its connection with mental illness.
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Russell Foster: Why We Need More Sleep

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Inside the mind of a master procrastinator | Tim Urban

Tim Urban knows that procrastination doesn't make sense, but he's never been able to shake his habit of waiting until the last minute to get things done. In this hilarious and insightful talk, Urban takes us on a journey through YouTube binges, Wikipedia rabbit holes and bouts of staring out the window -- and encourages us to think harder about what we're really procrastinating on, before we run out of time.

For more from Tim Urban, visit Wait But Why:

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more.
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What Daylight Means To Me - Prof Russell Foster

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Russell Foster is Professor of Circadian Neuroscience at Oxford University and a fellow of the Royal Society. His research into light sensitivity in the eye has led to new discoveries about light and the role it plays in our mental and physical wellbeing.
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Prof Russell Foster - Sleep and Young People

Prof Russell Foster, Professor of Circadian Neuroscience at the University of Oxford talks with Director of Voices from Oxford Dr Sung Hee Kim. He stresses the importance of maintaining a good sleep cycle to the mental and physical health of young people. Russell speaks of how many teenagers nap after school, and then go to bed too late after interacting with the bright screens used in modern technology, none of which is conducive to getting a good night's sleep which is vital to be able to be able to function properly the following day. Russell also offers his advice and tips on how to improve sleep patterns, and thus become healthier, happier and more productive.

Russell Foster on how sleep science explains eye disease and mental health Full WIRED He

Russell Foster, professor of circadian neuroscience at the University of Oxford, wants to change your views, thoughts and ideas about sleep. Subscribe to WIRED ▻▻

The full article is available here: Professor Russell Foster of Oxford University delivers The Physiological Societys.

What does sleep have to do with mental health? Everything! To see more seminars like this, visit: neuratalks.org The focus of Neuroscience Research Australia, or NeuRA, has always been.

Professor Russell Foster

Professor Russell Foster CBE was awarded an honorary Doctor of Science in February 2015. We invited him back to address students during graduation in July 2016.

Professor Foster is a leading scientist whose research has transformed our understanding of how the eye detects light and redefined the clinical diagnosis of blindness. An expert in ‘circadian rhythms’ – the 24 hour rhythmically changing cycle of light and darkness – he’s been active in developing new approaches to understanding and treating the pervasive problem of sleep and circadian rhythm disruption in psychiatric illness.

Cheltenham Science Festival - sleep research - Evan Davis and Prof. Russell Foster

Join sleep-deprived presenter of Radio 4′s Today's programme, Evan Davis, and Oxford BRC researcher Professor Russell Foster on the subject of sleep. Filmed at the Cheltenham Science Festival.

Russell Foster

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