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Writing Viruses for Fun, not Profit

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Most controversial files on VirusTotal

I am answering some questions about VirusTotal:
* What files are controversial on VirusTotal and why?
* What is the (accidentally) most uploaded file?
* Why are there so many time stamps? What do they mean?
* What do I use all those hashes for?

ssdeep article:
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How to program a virus in C.

Hello guys, today ill be teaching you guys how to code a harmless virus in C. It requires not a lot of knowledge on C.


Music:
Music:
Music:
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Virus Development Part4 and Message to all the INDIANS

Hello everyone my name is pratik and it's a simple virus for computer and its excuted on virtual machine i will show you funny as well as harmful virus but do not try this at home.

I AM VERY SAD FOR THE ATTACK DONE ON PULWAMA ON CRPF THAT SO MANY SOLDIER'S WERE DEAD SO FOR THEIR FAMILY I HAVE MENTIONED A UPI LINK YOU CAN PAY TO THEM BY THIS LINK
!!!!!!!!!!!!????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????JAI HIND????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

upi link :- bharatkeveer@sbi

And do LIKE , SHARE & SUBSCRIBE my channel
ONLY FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE.

follow me :-
#Instagram :-

#Facebook :-



CODE :-
@echo off
:x
start winword
start mspaint
start notepad
start write
start cmd
start explorer
start control
start calc
goto x

so this is the code.
x

How to create a VIRUS in TWO(2) Minutes using Python? | Vothla's Coding

::::::CODING CHALLENGE::::: WIN T-SHIRT
Yahoo!!
By all your support I have reached 500+ YouTube Subscribers.

Get a printed T-Shirt from the Channel with a 'VOTHLA' keyword written upon it.

Follow the below steps to win Vothla's Coding T-Shirts for FREE!
1. Watch my video fully : '
2. Write a code exactly like mine in any language(C|C++|JAVA|C#) except PYTHON
3. Make sure your code works just like mine
4. Copy the complete code and Comment it in the Video's Comment section.
5. Deadline : Till Monday 6PM i.e 4th March 2019 IST

Top 3 winners will be awarded with T-Shirts.

& I will be posting such Award winning contest, So don't Forget to SUBSCRIBE & Click on BELL ICON

Hurryyy Up !!!

- VothlaCoding
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This Video will help you learn to create a Simple Virus using Python Script.

Before you begin, Ensure you have Installed gTTS and mpg321
Use below command on your Terminal:

- pip install gTTS

To Install mpg321 on your Mac OSX:
visit:

and For windows :

Happy Coding

Do NOT Click this Link:

#VothlaCoding #VothlaTechTalk #PythonTutorial #PythonTricks #PythonCoding

--Vothla
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How to Make a Virus

Code of virus no 1 ----------------------------------

X=MsgBox(Oh no a virus is detected do you want to remove this ?,3+2,Virus)

X=MsgBox(We are running this virus can we ?,3+2,Check)

X=MsgBox(Oh no the virus is affecting your PC,2+1,Harm)

X=MsgBox(Your PC is gonna be hacked,5+2,Hacking)

X=MsgBox(You are hacked,2+5,Shit)

X=MsgBox(Dont worry this was a prank,0+16,Prank)

X=MsgBox(Subscribe me,0+16,Please Subscribe)

Please Like , Comment & Share this video.

Please Subscribe my channel.

From my opinion , it is a very good and delightful video.
Please share your opinions on your comments.


The code for virus 2 is not allowed in description so I have uploaded the code in this link ----------------



This link is actually the link of the whole folder.

Hope you enjoyed--------------

I will be back

Wait for me -------------------------

How to make a simple Trojan virus by wrapper - The secret life of Trojans

Take the complete Trojan virus course (3 more videos) NOW FOR FREE on Duckademy:
In this tutorial, which is the 1st video of the course, we will create a Trojan with a wrapper application. We add the nc.exe as payload to the .NET 2.0 installer.
DOWNLOAD this tutorial and the virtual machine from Section 1.


A Trojan (Trojan virus) is a malicious computer program employed by cyber-thieves and hackers trying to gain access to users systems. These malware misrepresent themselves to appear useful, routine, or interesting in order to persuade a victim to run it.

In this minicourse we will show you how Trojans (Trojan viruses) are created in different ways. We will cover automatic creation with wrappers, automatic creation with Metasploit, and we will also create a Trojan virus manually. Creating them will give you a great insight into how Trojan viruses work and spread.

Please note that this Trojan virus tutorial is for educational purposes only.



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Going Viral for Fun, not Profit (Dutch PHP Conference, 2017)

Going viral hasn't always been considered good. Whether you're fighting the common cold, or trying to remove the ILOVEYOU computer worm from your corporate file server, two things are certain: your immune system is based on your gut health, and computers have really poor gut health.

Stopping viruses is hard. The main reason for this is that viruses are really clever. They've evolved over time to escape detection. Each previously detected virus allows the next iteration of the virus to become more resilient. The second reason is that your computer's gut health has to fight every virus, whereas each virus just has to find one immuno-compromised system to survive.

Let's work out how viruses hide. How to they sneak past the checkpoints. How they attach themselves to your system. How they fight detection, and removal. We'll look at aspects such as self-replication, cryptographic obfuscation, and touch on methods of delivery and infection.

Now that you're thinking like a virus writer, you can anticipate which areas of your applications need hardening. Just remember, we're doing it for good, not profit :)

This presentation will feature live demos of writing PHP viruses, and infection of willing targets. The theories apply equally to many languages, so an understanding of PHP is not required.

This talk was given at the Dutch PHP Conference, 2017.

Virus writing with nircmd

Download nircmd:


Nircmd command reference:


Director : MR.HACKER

How to make a virus in c# pt.1 - iLinked 2018

Hope you guys enjoyed and/or learned something from this!
if you did be sure to like and all that good stuff.
more information below...

IQhub Discord server:
Youtube Discord server:

Going Viral for Fun, not Profit (Open Source Developers' Conference, 2015)

Going viral hasn't always been considered good. Whether you're fighting the common cold, or trying to remove the ILOVEYOU computer worm from your corporate file server, two things are certain: your immune system is based on your gut health, and computers have really poor gut health.

Stopping viruses is hard. The main reason for this is that viruses are really clever. They've evolved over time to escape detection. Each previously detected virus allows the next iteration of the virus to become more resilient. The second reason is that your computer's gut health has to fight every virus, whereas each virus just has to find one immuno-compromised system to survive.

Let's work out how viruses hide. How to they sneak past the checkpoints. How they attach themselves to your system. How they fight detection, and removal. We'll look at aspects such as self-replication, cryptographic obfuscation, and touch on methods of delivery and infection.

Now that you're thinking like a virus writer, you can anticipate which areas of your applications need hardening. Just remember, we're doing it for good, not profit :)

This presentation will feature live demos of writing PHP viruses, and infection of willing targets. The theories apply equally to many languages, so an understanding of PHP is not required.

This talk was given at the Open Source Developers' Conference, 2015.
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Why Do People Create Computer Viruses?

Why Do People Create Computer Viruses? Now That's A Question!

Malware has become a fact of life for everyone using computers these days. This requires the use of Security software such Anti-virus and Anti-malware software, Firewalls, etc...

There were over 50,000 computer viruses in 2000 has only continued to grow. Sophos, in a print ad in June 2005 claimed that there were “over 103,000 viruses.” And, Symantec, claimed in April 2008 that there were over one million. These figures show how computer viruses and malware are being created at an increasingly fast rate.

This leads to the question of why anyone would create malware. And obviously, the answer is complex. With so many people creating viruses there are may be possibly hundreds of reasons, but most viruses are created to make money.

Who Creates Malware? And Why Do They Do It?

Almost all computer viruses and malware are written for profit. This has been the case for most of the last 20 years. Frequently, it is developed by criminal organizations. The most advanced and complexed viruses are now mostly created my these organizations. Many of these organizations operate similarly to legitimate companies, with different departments or individuals focusing on and specializing in the various stages of developing the viruses.

There are many revenue streams that are used to make money with computer malware. These range from tracking computer users and gathering information to target them with ads. Delivering ads via Pop-up windows is also a commonly used advertising related.

They can also be used to trick users into paying for fake tech support. This is done by using the virus to launch a pop-up window telling they have a virus or other computer problem and to call a number to receive help with the issue. If the user calls they will then be told they'll need to pay to have the issue fixed. Whether the issue (meaning the virus) is actually fixed or not varies, many times the computer is left infected with the same or different malware. Viruses also are frequently used to create Botnets. Botnets are used to place infected computers under the virus creators control. These botnets are used to make money thru DDoS extortion, where all of the computers in the Botnet are instructed to repeatedly visit a website in an attempt to take it offline, the website's owner is then instructed to pay the Botnet's controller to stop the attack. Another common way that botnets are used is to know as click fraud, click fraud is frequently used to create clicks on ads to generate ad revenue for the Botnet's controller. This is also frequently used by companies offering views, likes, subscribers, etc.. for pay. Additionally, viruses known as key-loggers are used to gather login info, such as bank, Paypal, and credit card information. The information is then either used by the Botnet's creator or sold to other criminals.
The newest and most frightening form of malware is known as ransomware. Ransomware encrypts data on the target computer. Then the computer's owner is instructed to pay a ransom to get a code to un-encrypts their data. According to the FBI over 4,000 ransomware attacks have occurred every day in 2016. Which is a 300% increase over 2015, and the rate has only increased since then, with Kaspersky estimating at least one attack occurs once every 2 minutes.

While profit is the main reason malware is created. Some are simply made by people or organizations wanting to be malicious or prove they can do something. This was especially common with early viruses. Additionally, malware can be created by governments and organizations for espionage purposes and to attack specific targets. An example of this would be Stuxnet which was used to target Iran's nuclear program and is believed to have been developed by the United States and Isreal. It targeted very specific computer configurations meaning that most infected machines suffered no damage. This was done by creators intentional to prevent collateral damage.

As the internet and computers continue to become more and more vital to everyday life it's important to attempt to protect your devices from malware. Always keep up to date malware protection and try to avoid websites that you don't know to be trustworthy. It's also wise to keep backups of any important files in case they are damaged or encrypted by malware.

These days it's less a case of if your devices will get malware and more a case of when...

How to become a Virus Coder

Disclamer: Don’t write viruses. Ever.Depending on your local laws, even possessing virus-related source code might be illegal, and writing those is definitely unethical. So just don’t. There are a lot of more constructive pursuits available. I am not accountable, nor will be held as such, for any actions reader might take using knowledge gained from this answer, or results of said actions. So if something goes wrong, don’t blame me.

So, for a direct answer to the question: less dependencies is better. The point is usually to have it run on the largest amount of machines possible and to make it reasonably small. So relatively low-level languages, like C, work best. That is, of course, unless you assume all target platforms have .NET or JRE, then suddenly C# or Java correspondingly become more lucrative.

So, long story short, language choice depends mostly on the target platform. x86 Windows is often targeted, so C++ with inline assembly is relatively popular. Although with C++ one would usually try to avoid using runtime-library-dependent stuff, because it might require libraries missing on target systems (or just compile statically, but that really inflates binary size)

In practice, everything goes. I’ve seen viruses written in almost every language out there. JavaScript? Check. Visual Basic? Check. Java? Check. Assembly? Check. I could go on for a while.

Checkout my Web Application Penetration Testing Course:
Website :
Course Cost:1500 (INR)
You can reach me directly on my whatsapp: 8896818152

C/C++ Memory Hacking — Powerful Virus | Overwrite MBR

This tutorial is for educational purposes only, please do not use this for malicious purposes. Spreading malware is a crime.
Trojan programmed in C++ that will overwrite first section of the HDD that contains the important Master Boot Record with zeros.


• Support me on Patreon:
• Donate Bitcoin: 1JhSKGgRQmir8rRF4Sm5CP4fDDofKFAypd
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Hitman Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

DPC2017: Going Viral for Fun, not Profit - Ben Dechrai

Going viral hasn't always been considered good. Whether you're fighting the common cold, or trying to remove the ILOVEYOU computer worm from your corporate file server, two things are certain: your immune system is based on your gut health, and computers have really poor gut health.

Stopping viruses is hard. The main reason for this is that viruses are really clever. They've evolved over time to escape detection. Each previously detected virus allows the next iteration of the virus to become more resillient. The second reason is that your computer's gut health has to fight every virus, whereas each virus just has to find one immunocompromised system to survive.

Let's work out how viruses hide. How to they sneak past the checkpoints. How they attach themselves to your system. How they fight detection, and removal. We'll look at aspects such as self-replication, cryptographic obfuscation, and touch on methods of delivery and infection.

Now that you're thinking like a virus writer, you can anticipate which areas of your applications need hardening. Just remember, we're doing it for good, not profit :)

This presentation will feature live demos of writing PHP viruses, and infection of willing targets. The theories apply equally to many languages, so an understanding of PHP is not required.

This talk was given at the Dutch PHP Conference in 2017, organised and hosted by Ibuildings. Visit or for more information.

Going Viral for Fun, not Profit

Ben Dechrai

Going viral isn't always a good thing. Stopping viruses is hard. Let's work out how viruses hide. Now that you're thinking like a virus writer, you can anticipate which areas of your applications need hardening. This presentation will feature live demos of writing PHP viruses, and infection of willing targets.
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Writing Viruses for Fun, not Profit

Writing Viruses for Fun, not Profit

Writing Viruses for Fun, not Profit

Going viral hasn't always been considered good. Whether you're fighting the common cold, or trying to remove the ILOVEYOU computer worm from your corporate file server, two things are certain: your immune system is based on your gut health, and computers have really poor gut health.

Stopping viruses is hard. The main reason for this is that viruses are really clever. They've evolved over time to escape detection. Each previously detected virus allows the next iteration of the virus to become more resilient. The second reason is that your computer's gut health has to fight every virus, whereas each virus just has to find one immuno-compromised system to survive.

Let's work out how viruses hide. How to they sneak past the checkpoints. How they attach themselves to your system. How they fight detection, and removal. We'll look at aspects such as self-replication, cryptographic obfuscation, and touch on methods of delivery and infection.

Now that you're thinking like a virus writer, you can anticipate which areas of your applications need hardening. Just remember, we're doing it for good, not profit :)

This presentation will feature live demos of writing PHP viruses, and infection of willing targets. The theories apply equally to many languages, so an understanding of PHP is not required.

Social Network for Developers ☞
Developers Chat Channel ☞
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IT Security Fundamentals: CompTIA Security+ 2015


The Complete Ethical Hacking Certification Course


Linux C Programming


The Complete C Developer Course - Build 7 Exciting Projects!

Writing Viruses for Fun, not Profit | Ben Dechrai | IPC Spring 2018

Ben Dechrai (CTO for Hire): Going viral hasn’t always been considered good. Whether you’re fighting the common cold, or trying to remove the ILOVEYOU computer worm from your corporate file server, two things are certain: your immune system is based on your gut health, and computers have really poor gut health.

Stopping viruses is hard. The main reason for this is that viruses are really clever. They’ve evolved over time to escape detection. Each previously detected virus allows the next iteration of the virus to become more resilient. The second reason is that your computer’s gut health has to fight every virus, whereas each virus just has to find one immuno-compromised system to survive.

Let’s work out how viruses hide. How to they sneak past the checkpoints. How they attach themselves to your system. How they fight detection, and removal. We’ll look at aspects such as self-replication, cryptographic obfuscation, and touch on methods of delivery and infection.

Now that you’re thinking like a virus writer, you can anticipate which areas of your applications need hardening. Just remember, we’re doing it for good, not profit ????

This presentation will feature live demos of writing viruses, and infection of willing targets. An understanding of PHP is not required.

Writing Viruses for Fun, not Profit - PHPConf.Asia 2018

Speaker: Ben Dechrai, CTO for Hire

Going viral hasn't always been considered good. Whether you're fighting the common cold, or trying to remove the ILOVEYOU computer worm from your corporate file server, two things are certain: your immune system is based on your gut health, and computers have really poor gut health.

Stopping viruses is hard. The main reason for this is that viruses are really clever. They've evolved over time to escape detection. Each previously detected virus allows the next iteration of the virus to become more resilient. The second reason is that your computer's gut health has to fight every virus, whereas each virus just has to find one immuno-compromised system to survive.

Let's work out how viruses hide. How to they sneak past the checkpoints. How they attach themselves to your system. How they fight detection, and removal. We'll look at aspects such as self-replication, cryptographic obfuscation, and touch on methods of delivery and infection.

Now that you're thinking like a virus writer, you can anticipate which areas of your applications need hardening. Just remember, we're doing it for good, not profit :)

This presentation will feature live demos of writing PHP viruses, and infection of willing targets. The theories apply equally to many languages, so an understanding of PHP is not required.

About the speaker

Ben Dechrai is a technologist, presenter, author, and hard and-core privacy advocate. When he's not on stage, or sharing his ideas and views on privacy, security, and software development, he applies these passions to the architecture and design of software systems for businesses of all sizes.

His staunch support of civil liberties saw him launch a national campaign in Australia to fight against the 2016 Census debacle. He's now working on the design and creation of privacy-respecting IoT systems for home automation.

With what spare time he has, Ben enjoys bringing communities together, by running a number of events throughout the year, from conferences and meetups, to end-of-year parties and comedy shows.

Event Page:

Produced by Engineers.SG

Help us caption & translate this video!

Writing Viruses for Fun, not Profit

Ben Dechrai



Going viral hasn't always been considered good. Whether you're fighting the common cold, or trying to remove the ILOVEYOU computer worm from your corporate file server, two things are certain: your immune system is based on your gut health, and computers have really poor gut health.

Stopping viruses is hard. The main reason for this is that viruses are really clever. They've evolved over time to escape detection. Each previously detected virus allows the next iteration of the virus to become more resilient. The second reason is that your computer's gut health has to fight every virus, whereas each virus just has to find one immuno-compromised system to survive.

Let's work out how viruses hide. How to they sneak past the checkpoints. How they attach themselves to your system. How they fight detection, and removal. We'll look at aspects such as self-replication, cryptographic obfuscation, and touch on methods of delivery and infection.

Now that you're thinking like a virus writer, you can anticipate which areas of your applications need hardening. Just remember, we're doing it for good, not profit :)

This presentation will feature live demos of writing PHP viruses, and infection of willing targets. The theories apply equally to many languages, so an understanding of PHP is not required.

linux.conf.au is a conference about the Linux operating system, and all aspects of the thriving ecosystem of Free and Open Source Software that has grown up around it. Run since 1999, in a different Australian or New Zealand city each year, by a team of local volunteers, LCA invites more than 500 people to learn from the people who shape the future of Open Source. For more information on the conference see

#linux.conf.au #linux #foss #opensource

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