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Writing Viruses for Fun, not Profit

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Writing Viruses for Fun, not Profit

Ben Dechrai



Going viral hasn't always been considered good. Whether you're fighting the common cold, or trying to remove the ILOVEYOU computer worm from your corporate file server, two things are certain: your immune system is based on your gut health, and computers have really poor gut health.

Stopping viruses is hard. The main reason for this is that viruses are really clever. They've evolved over time to escape detection. Each previously detected virus allows the next iteration of the virus to become more resilient. The second reason is that your computer's gut health has to fight every virus, whereas each virus just has to find one immuno-compromised system to survive.

Let's work out how viruses hide. How to they sneak past the checkpoints. How they attach themselves to your system. How they fight detection, and removal. We'll look at aspects such as self-replication, cryptographic obfuscation, and touch on methods of delivery and infection.

Now that you're thinking like a virus writer, you can anticipate which areas of your applications need hardening. Just remember, we're doing it for good, not profit :)

This presentation will feature live demos of writing PHP viruses, and infection of willing targets. The theories apply equally to many languages, so an understanding of PHP is not required.

linux.conf.au is a conference about the Linux operating system, and all aspects of the thriving ecosystem of Free and Open Source Software that has grown up around it. Run since 1999, in a different Australian or New Zealand city each year, by a team of local volunteers, LCA invites more than 500 people to learn from the people who shape the future of Open Source. For more information on the conference see

#linux.conf.au #linux #foss #opensource

Writing Viruses for Fun, not Profit - PHPConf.Asia 2018

Speaker: Ben Dechrai, CTO for Hire

Going viral hasn't always been considered good. Whether you're fighting the common cold, or trying to remove the ILOVEYOU computer worm from your corporate file server, two things are certain: your immune system is based on your gut health, and computers have really poor gut health.

Stopping viruses is hard. The main reason for this is that viruses are really clever. They've evolved over time to escape detection. Each previously detected virus allows the next iteration of the virus to become more resilient. The second reason is that your computer's gut health has to fight every virus, whereas each virus just has to find one immuno-compromised system to survive.

Let's work out how viruses hide. How to they sneak past the checkpoints. How they attach themselves to your system. How they fight detection, and removal. We'll look at aspects such as self-replication, cryptographic obfuscation, and touch on methods of delivery and infection.

Now that you're thinking like a virus writer, you can anticipate which areas of your applications need hardening. Just remember, we're doing it for good, not profit :)

This presentation will feature live demos of writing PHP viruses, and infection of willing targets. The theories apply equally to many languages, so an understanding of PHP is not required.

About the speaker

Ben Dechrai is a technologist, presenter, author, and hard and-core privacy advocate. When he's not on stage, or sharing his ideas and views on privacy, security, and software development, he applies these passions to the architecture and design of software systems for businesses of all sizes.

His staunch support of civil liberties saw him launch a national campaign in Australia to fight against the 2016 Census debacle. He's now working on the design and creation of privacy-respecting IoT systems for home automation.

With what spare time he has, Ben enjoys bringing communities together, by running a number of events throughout the year, from conferences and meetups, to end-of-year parties and comedy shows.

Event Page:

Produced by Engineers.SG

Help us caption & translate this video!

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Writing Viruses for Fun, not Profit

Going viral hasn't always been considered good. Whether you're fighting the common cold, or trying to remove the ILOVEYOU computer worm from your corporate file server, two things are certain: your immune system is based on your gut health, and computers have really poor gut health.

Stopping viruses is hard. The main reason for this is that viruses are really clever. They've evolved over time to escape detection. Each previously detected virus allows the next iteration of the virus to become more resilient. The second reason is that your computer's gut health has to fight every virus, whereas each virus just has to find one immuno-compromised system to survive.

Let's work out how viruses hide. How to they sneak past the checkpoints. How they attach themselves to your system. How they fight detection, and removal. We'll look at aspects such as self-replication, cryptographic obfuscation, and touch on methods of delivery and infection.

Now that you're thinking like a virus writer, you can anticipate which areas of your applications need hardening. Just remember, we're doing it for good, not profit :)

This presentation will feature live demos of writing PHP viruses, and infection of willing targets. The theories apply equally to many languages, so an understanding of PHP is not required.

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Writing Viruses for Fun, not Profit | Ben Dechrai | IPC Spring 2018

Ben Dechrai (CTO for Hire): Going viral hasn’t always been considered good. Whether you’re fighting the common cold, or trying to remove the ILOVEYOU computer worm from your corporate file server, two things are certain: your immune system is based on your gut health, and computers have really poor gut health.

Stopping viruses is hard. The main reason for this is that viruses are really clever. They’ve evolved over time to escape detection. Each previously detected virus allows the next iteration of the virus to become more resilient. The second reason is that your computer’s gut health has to fight every virus, whereas each virus just has to find one immuno-compromised system to survive.

Let’s work out how viruses hide. How to they sneak past the checkpoints. How they attach themselves to your system. How they fight detection, and removal. We’ll look at aspects such as self-replication, cryptographic obfuscation, and touch on methods of delivery and infection.

Now that you’re thinking like a virus writer, you can anticipate which areas of your applications need hardening. Just remember, we’re doing it for good, not profit 🙂

This presentation will feature live demos of writing viruses, and infection of willing targets. An understanding of PHP is not required.
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Writing Viruses for Fun, not Profit

Writing Viruses for Fun, not Profit

Going Viral for Fun, not Profit

Ben Dechrai

Going viral isn't always a good thing. Stopping viruses is hard. Let's work out how viruses hide. Now that you're thinking like a virus writer, you can anticipate which areas of your applications need hardening. This presentation will feature live demos of writing PHP viruses, and infection of willing targets.
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Most Dangerous Computer Viruses In The World

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Many of us at some point in time have had a computer start acting very strange; there are a lot of threats out there, and many come in the form of viruses. Computer viruses got their name because they act like viruses, and replicate. They infect lots of files on a machine and can be spread to another machine by doing thing things like sending files to someone else, or using an infected USB drive on another computer. Then you have worms, adware, Trojans, and Rootkits, which are hard to detect and can give attackers control of your machine. Perhaps even more frightening are ransomware attacks, where someone gets ahold of your data, sometimes sensitive data, and makes you pay to get it back. Today we’ll look at some of the biggest attacks on computers, in this episode of the Infographics Show, The world’s most dangerous computer viruses.


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Going Viral for Fun, not Profit (Open Source Developers' Conference, 2015)

Going viral hasn't always been considered good. Whether you're fighting the common cold, or trying to remove the ILOVEYOU computer worm from your corporate file server, two things are certain: your immune system is based on your gut health, and computers have really poor gut health.

Stopping viruses is hard. The main reason for this is that viruses are really clever. They've evolved over time to escape detection. Each previously detected virus allows the next iteration of the virus to become more resilient. The second reason is that your computer's gut health has to fight every virus, whereas each virus just has to find one immuno-compromised system to survive.

Let's work out how viruses hide. How to they sneak past the checkpoints. How they attach themselves to your system. How they fight detection, and removal. We'll look at aspects such as self-replication, cryptographic obfuscation, and touch on methods of delivery and infection.

Now that you're thinking like a virus writer, you can anticipate which areas of your applications need hardening. Just remember, we're doing it for good, not profit :)

This presentation will feature live demos of writing PHP viruses, and infection of willing targets. The theories apply equally to many languages, so an understanding of PHP is not required.

This talk was given at the Open Source Developers' Conference, 2015.

Going Viral for Fun, not Profit (Dutch PHP Conference, 2017)

Going viral hasn't always been considered good. Whether you're fighting the common cold, or trying to remove the ILOVEYOU computer worm from your corporate file server, two things are certain: your immune system is based on your gut health, and computers have really poor gut health.

Stopping viruses is hard. The main reason for this is that viruses are really clever. They've evolved over time to escape detection. Each previously detected virus allows the next iteration of the virus to become more resilient. The second reason is that your computer's gut health has to fight every virus, whereas each virus just has to find one immuno-compromised system to survive.

Let's work out how viruses hide. How to they sneak past the checkpoints. How they attach themselves to your system. How they fight detection, and removal. We'll look at aspects such as self-replication, cryptographic obfuscation, and touch on methods of delivery and infection.

Now that you're thinking like a virus writer, you can anticipate which areas of your applications need hardening. Just remember, we're doing it for good, not profit :)

This presentation will feature live demos of writing PHP viruses, and infection of willing targets. The theories apply equally to many languages, so an understanding of PHP is not required.

This talk was given at the Dutch PHP Conference, 2017.

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Why Do People Create Computer Viruses?

Why Do People Create Computer Viruses? Now That's A Question!

Malware has become a fact of life for everyone using computers these days. This requires the use of Security software such Anti-virus and Anti-malware software, Firewalls, etc...

There were over 50,000 computer viruses in 2000 has only continued to grow. Sophos, in a print ad in June 2005 claimed that there were “over 103,000 viruses.” And, Symantec, claimed in April 2008 that there were over one million. These figures show how computer viruses and malware are being created at an increasingly fast rate.

This leads to the question of why anyone would create malware. And obviously, the answer is complex. With so many people creating viruses there are may be possibly hundreds of reasons, but most viruses are created to make money.

Who Creates Malware? And Why Do They Do It?

Almost all computer viruses and malware are written for profit. This has been the case for most of the last 20 years. Frequently, it is developed by criminal organizations. The most advanced and complexed viruses are now mostly created my these organizations. Many of these organizations operate similarly to legitimate companies, with different departments or individuals focusing on and specializing in the various stages of developing the viruses.

There are many revenue streams that are used to make money with computer malware. These range from tracking computer users and gathering information to target them with ads. Delivering ads via Pop-up windows is also a commonly used advertising related.

They can also be used to trick users into paying for fake tech support. This is done by using the virus to launch a pop-up window telling they have a virus or other computer problem and to call a number to receive help with the issue. If the user calls they will then be told they'll need to pay to have the issue fixed. Whether the issue (meaning the virus) is actually fixed or not varies, many times the computer is left infected with the same or different malware. Viruses also are frequently used to create Botnets. Botnets are used to place infected computers under the virus creators control. These botnets are used to make money thru DDoS extortion, where all of the computers in the Botnet are instructed to repeatedly visit a website in an attempt to take it offline, the website's owner is then instructed to pay the Botnet's controller to stop the attack. Another common way that botnets are used is to know as click fraud, click fraud is frequently used to create clicks on ads to generate ad revenue for the Botnet's controller. This is also frequently used by companies offering views, likes, subscribers, etc.. for pay. Additionally, viruses known as key-loggers are used to gather login info, such as bank, Paypal, and credit card information. The information is then either used by the Botnet's creator or sold to other criminals.
The newest and most frightening form of malware is known as ransomware. Ransomware encrypts data on the target computer. Then the computer's owner is instructed to pay a ransom to get a code to un-encrypts their data. According to the FBI over 4,000 ransomware attacks have occurred every day in 2016. Which is a 300% increase over 2015, and the rate has only increased since then, with Kaspersky estimating at least one attack occurs once every 2 minutes.

While profit is the main reason malware is created. Some are simply made by people or organizations wanting to be malicious or prove they can do something. This was especially common with early viruses. Additionally, malware can be created by governments and organizations for espionage purposes and to attack specific targets. An example of this would be Stuxnet which was used to target Iran's nuclear program and is believed to have been developed by the United States and Isreal. It targeted very specific computer configurations meaning that most infected machines suffered no damage. This was done by creators intentional to prevent collateral damage.

As the internet and computers continue to become more and more vital to everyday life it's important to attempt to protect your devices from malware. Always keep up to date malware protection and try to avoid websites that you don't know to be trustworthy. It's also wise to keep backups of any important files in case they are damaged or encrypted by malware.

These days it's less a case of if your devices will get malware and more a case of when...

Reversing Malicious Office Document (Macro) Emotet(?)

OLEVBA -

1:58 - Extract Macro with olevba
2:40 - ExifTool to examine Document Metadata (Comments used in Macro)
3:48 - Examining Macro Code
4:21 - Using Python to explan Right(left))
7:20 - Opening ProcMon
9:07 - Why you should be careful when executing portions of bad code
9:55 - Viewing Macro's in Word and DeObfuscating by changing Shell to Print
12:17 - Start of Obfuscated Powershell (after de-base64)
13:21 - Malicious Powershell Code
15:15 - Upload to VirusTotal
16:51 - Looking at process explorer
20:21 - Looking at Wireshark
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Virus Simulation in Python: why viruses are so difficult to deal with

Please comments your thoughts down below. Thanks to Eric Grimson from Massachusetts Institute of Technology for providing this lab. This simulation is not our original idea, we simply completed the lab by writing the code.

Writing Bad @$$ Malware For OS X

by Patrick Wardle

In comparison to Windows malware, known OS X threats are really quite lame. As an Apple user that has drank the 'Apple Juice,' I didn't think that was fair!

From novel persistence techniques, to native OS X components that can be abused to thwart analysis, this talk will detail exactly how to create elegant, bad@ss OS X malware. And since detection is often a death knell for malware, the talk will also show how OS X's native malware mitigations and 3rd-party security tools were bypassed. For example I'll detail how Gatekeeper was remotely bypassed to allow unsigned download code to be executed, how Apple's 'rootpipe' patch was side-stepped to gain root on a fully patched system, and how all popular 3rd-party AV and personal firewall products were generically bypassed by my simple proof-of-concept malware.

However, don't throw out your Macs just yet! The talk will conclude by presenting several free security tools that can generically detect or even prevent advanced OS X threats. Armed with such tools, we'll ensure that our computers are better protected against both current and future OS X malware.

So unless you work for Apple, come learn how to take your OS X malware skills to the next level and better secure your Mac at the same time!

how to make simple computer virus(harmless)

create simple virus using notepad for fun
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a word to virus writers

A word to all the hackers and virus writers

How to create a VIRUS in TWO(2) Minutes using Python? | Vothla's Coding

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This Video will help you learn to create a Simple Virus using Python Script.

Before you begin, Ensure you have Installed gTTS and mpg321
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Ignorance vs Understanding: Regulation of "malware"?

Ignorance vs Understanding: Regulation of malware?

The similarities between kinetic and digital weapons are astonishing - both are nothing more than agnostic technology.

It's how the technology is used that dicatates a positive or negative result and both are nearly impossible to truly remove from the populace. As a result regulators create a patchwork quilt of confusing and ridiculous laws typically based out of ignorance and fear.

We're now at a point in which we're again seeing this same sort of ignorance and fear being applied to the research, development and analysis of malware. There were attempts in the past to sue lawful firearms manufacturers for the harm caused by their product and we're now seeing that same logic applied to hackers and software coders working with 'malware' in which there is a momement afoot to hold them criminally liable for actions done with their code even if they were not the ones instigating the actions.

Using regulations and ignorant laws to control technology inevitably fails.

Malicious people will do malicious things and keeping technology out of the hands of the good people is never the right answer.

Ignorance is never the answer.

Please join us for this 45 minute round table discussion with some true experts in this field:

John Strand of Black Hills infosec (and SANS instructor):


Jake Williams of Rendition Infosec (and SANS instructor):


Deviant Ollam, physical security expert:


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How Hackers Create Undetectable Malware and Viruses

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Simple Virus program in C

Create simple Virus file in C programming.

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