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noc18-bt26-Lecture 16- Some common wildlife disease

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noc18-bt26-Lecture 16- Some common wildlife disease

In this lecture, we understand some common wildlife diseases using four diseases (anthrax, rabies, ringworm and tapeworm) as case studies. We explore how diseases lurk in the environment, how they get transmitted, and also how they can be controlled in wild situations.
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noc18-bt26-Lecture 17- Principles of disease management

In this lecture, we explore how host, pathogen and environmental characteristics act together for the spread of diseases. We look at quick methods of estimating animal health, and also the maintenance strategies of infectious agents.
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noc18-bt26-Lecture 15-Some terminologies

In this lecture, we explore certain key terms that explain the characteristics of diseases and their causal factors. These terminologies will serve as a foundation for the next few lectures.
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noc18-bt26-Lecture 14-Habitat management & improvement

In this lecture, we explore how axe, cattle, plough, gun and fire can serve as tools for habitat management and improvement. We also discuss the habitat improvement options of neglect, reclamation, restoration, replacement and enhancement, besides examining the mitigation options for proposed development plans. We also look at field examples of habitat management and improvement such as control of forest fires through SimplyFire, fire maps, fire breakers, control of invasive species, provisioning of water holes and salt licks, involvement of locals and stakeholders through camps, habitat monitoring using tools such as AutoCam, plantations, trash collection, etc.
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Why should we care about wildlife disease? | Craig Willis | TEDxUniversityofWinnipeg

What can bats teach us about human impact on wildlife diseases?

Dr. Craig Willis is a Professor of Biology at the University of Winnipeg who studies the ecology, behaviour, physiology, and conservation of wild mammals, especially bats. Dr. Willis and his students have been especially active in the fight against an alarming fungal disease of bats called white-nose syndrome (WNS). WNS first appeared in northern New York state in winter 2007. In only 10 years it has killed millions of hibernating bats across eastern North America, causing the fastest decline of wild mammals ever recorded and leading Canada to list three species as ‘endangered’. Dr. Willis and his team provided the first direct evidence of the cause of mortality from WNS and were first to show that the fungus is an invasive species to North America. Since then they have been active in research to help slow the spread of this disease, help WNS-affected bats survive and reproduce and help guide management and policy for wildlife diseases more generally.
Dr. Craig Willis is a Professor of Biology at the University of Winnipeg who studies the ecology, behaviour, physiology and conservation of wild mammals, especially bats. Dr. Willis and his students have been especially active in the fight against an alarming fungal disease of bats called white-nose syndrome (WNS). WNS first appeared in northern New York state in winter 2007. In only 10 years it has killed millions of hibernating bats across eastern North America, causing the fastest decline of wild mammals ever recorded and leading Canada to list three species as ‘endangered’. Dr. Willis and his team provided the first direct evidence of the cause of mortality from WNS and were first to show that the fungus is an invasive species to North America. Since then they have been active in research to help slow the spread of this disease, help WNS-affected bats survive and reproduce and help guide management and policy for wildlife diseases more generally.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at

noc18-bt26 Lecture 01-Preliminaries

Conservation, Preservation, Environmentalism, Ecology.
IUCN Red list categories.
Keystone, umbrella and flagship species.

noc18-bt26 Lecture 35-Plastic and biodiversity

noc18-bt26 Lecture 38-Revision-I

noc18-bt26 lec 30-Fundamentals

noc18-bt26 Lec 28-Population viability analysis

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noc18-bt26-Lecture 05-Preliminaries

Preliminaries

noc18-bt26 Lecture 37-Crisis and Learning-- The Sariska case-study

What is WILDLIFE DISEASE? What does WILDLIFE DISEASE mean? WILDLIFE meaning & explanation

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What is WILDLIFE DISEASE? What does WILDLIFE DISEASE mean? WILDLIFE meaning - WILDLIFE DISEASE definition - WILDLIFE DISEASE explanation.

Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under license.

Wildlife, domestic animals and humans share a large and increasing number of infectious diseases, known as zoonoses. The continued globalization of society, human population growth, and associated landscape changes further enhances the interface between wildlife, domestic animals, and humans, thereby facilitating additional infectious disease emergence. The wildlife component of this triad has received inadequate focus in the past to effectively protect human health as evidenced by such contemporary diseases as SARS, Lyme disease, West Nile Fever, and a host of other emerging diseases. Further, habitat loss and other factors associated with human-induced landscape changes have reduced past ability for many wildlife populations to overcome losses due to various causes. This disease emergence and resurgence has reached unprecedented importance for the sustainability of desired population levels for many wildlife populations and for the long-term survival of some species.

The Wildlife Data Integration Network at the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, is a public information clearinghouse for wildlife disease materials, such as news, fact-sheets, images, and articles. The Wildlife Health Event Reporter is a Citizen Science project to facilitate recognition and public awareness of wildlife diseases.

Strategies for Wildlife Disease Surveillance: Case Study of White-Nose Syndrome in Bats

Please enjoy the first seminar the Daniel O. Trainer Wildlife Health Seminar Series with Dr. Jonathan Sleeman, D.V.M., Center Director of the USGS National Wildlife Health Center.

Dr. Sleeman reviews the importance of surveillance for wildlife diseases, the challenges of achieving surveillance goals, and the various strategies that can be used. Surveillance for white-nose syndrome in bats is used as a case study of a comprehensive, national surveillance program for a wildlife disease that is having devastating impacts on North American bats.

noc18-bt26 Lec 18-Preliminares

In this lecture, we explore the meaning of restraint, the four kinds of restraints, and some field situations requiring restraint. These are followed by some key points to note when administering restraint to wild animals.
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The Science of Wildlife Diseases

Wild animals, domestic animals and humans share a large and increasing number of infectious diseases, known as zoonoses. Humans and wildlife are more close than they ever have been and that increased interaction between humans and other animals facilitates infectious disease emergence. Wildlife diseases can affect the sustainability of many populations. Through this virtual event we will talk about diseases such as chronic wasting disease, white-nose syndrome, chytrid fungus and how they affect animals here in Nebraska.

GOHi Monthly Webinar: Wildlife Diseases

Faculty experts and industry thought leaders present on a One Health topic each month.

Speakers:
- Risa Pesapane, PhD, The Ohio State University, United States
- Jeanette O’Quin, DVM, MPH, DACVPM, DABVP, The Ohio State University, United States

noc18-bt26 Lec 26-Population genetics

The Growing Threat of Wildlife Disease to Human Health and What We Can Do To Prevent It

The #Coronavirus was transmitted from animals to humans – and we need to get a head start on making that future viruses don’t make the jump from wildlife. We can’t keep overlooking the role of wildlife in protecting our public health. House Democrats just passed the #HeroesAct to prevent the spread of wildlife-borne diseases to humans. Join us on May 19 at 1:00 p.m. Eastern time for a livestreamed roundtable on the new resources and authorities that wildlife agencies need to protect lives and stop the next pandemic before it starts.

noc18-bt26 Lec 20-Chemical capture

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